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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
ander George Minor Commander John M. Brooke. Provisions and clothing Assis't Surgeon John de Bree. Medicine and Surgery Surgeon W. A. W. Spotswood. Governors of the States during the War. Union States California Governor John G. Downey (1860-1) Governor Leland Stanford (1861-3) Governor Frederick F. Low (1863-8) Connecticut Governor William A. Buckingham (1858-66) Delaware Governor William Burton (1859-63) Governor William Cannon (1863-7) Illinois Governor Richard Yates (1861-5) Indiana Governor Oliver P. Morton (1861-7) Iowa Governor Samuel J. Kirkwood (1860-4) Governor William M. Stone (1864-8) Kansas Governor Charles Robinson (1861-3) Governor Thomas Carney (1863-5) Maine Governor Israel Washburn, Jr. (1861-3) Governor Abner Coburn (1863-4) Governor Samuel Cony (1864-7) Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew (1861-6) Michigan Governor Austin Blair (1861-4) Governor Henry H. Crapo (1865-9
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Outbreak of the rebellion-presiding at a Union meeting-mustering officer of State troops- Lyon at camp Jackson-services tendered to the government (search)
go to Springfield I went with them [April 25] and remained there until they were assigned to a regiment. There were so many more volunteers than had been called for that the question whom to accept was quite embarrassing to the governor, Richard Yates. The legislature was in session at the time, however, and came to his relief. A law was enacted authorizing the governor to accept the services of ten additional regiments, one from each congressional district, for one month, to be paid by, forming a part of the 11th Illinois volunteer infantry. My duties, I thought, had ended at Springfield, and I was prepared to start home by the evening train, leaving at nine o'clock. Up to that time I do not think I had been introduced to Governor Yates, or had ever spoken to him. I knew him by sight, however, because he was living at the same hotel and I often saw him at table. The evening I was to quit the capital I left the supper room before the governor and was standing at the front do
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Appointed Colonel of the 21st Illinois-Personnel of the regiment-general Logan-March to Missouri-movement against Harris at Florida, Mo. --General Pope in command-stationed at Mexico, Mo. (search)
and were accepted with their organizations as they were, except in two instances. A Chicago regiment, the 19th infantry, had elected a very young man to the colonelcy. When it came to taking the field the regiment asked to have another appointed colonel and the one they had previously chosen made lieutenant-colonel. The 21st regiment of infantry, mustered in by me at Mattoon, refused to go into the service with the colonel of their selection in any position. While I was still absent Governor Yates appointed me colonel of this latter regiment. A few days after I was in charge of it and in camp on the fair grounds near Springfield [June 15]. My regiment was composed in large part of young men of as good social position as any in their section of the State. It embraced the sons of farmers, lawyers, physicians, politicians, merchants, bankers and ministers, and some men of maturer years who had filled such positions themselves. There were also men in it who could be led astray
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Attack on Grand Gulf-operations below Vicksburg (search)
f the river as soon as possible. Accordingly, on the morning of the 29th, McClernand was directed to embark all the troops from his corps that our transports and barges could carry. About 10,000 men was so embarked. The plan was to have the navy silence the guns at Grand Gulf, and to have as many men as possible ready to debark in the shortest possible time under cover of the fire of the navy and carry the works by storm. The following order was issued: Note: On this occasion Governor Richard Yates, of Illinois, happened to be on a visit to the army, and accompanied me to Carthage. I furnished an ambulance for his use and that of some of the State officers who accompanied him. Perkins' Plantation, La., April 27, 1863 Major-General J. A. McClernand, Commanding 13th A. C. Commence immediately the embarkation of your corps, or so much of it as there is transportation for. Have put aboard the artillery and every article authorized in orders limiting baggage, except the men, a
Springfield were equally as vigilant, and, in the language of another, long before the contest closed we snuffed approaching victory in the air. Our laborious efforts met with a suitable reward. Lincoln was elected by a majority of 1511 in the district, a larger vote than Clay's two years before, which was only 914. In Sangamon county his majority was 690, and exceeded that of any of his predecessors on the Whig ticket, commencing with Stuart in 1834 and continuing on down to the days of Yates in 1852. Before Lincoln's departure for Washington to enter on his duties as a member of Congress, the Mexican war had begun. The volunteers had gone forward, and at the head of the regiments from Illinois some of the bravest men and the best legal talent in Springfield had marched. Hardin, Baker, Bissell, and even the dramatic Shields had enlisted. The issues of the war and the manner of its prosecution were in every man's mouth. Naturally, therefore, a Congressman-elect would be ex
Lincoln. The Republican party came into existence in Illinois as a party at Bloomington, May 29, 1856. The State convention of all opponents of anti-Nebraska legislation, referred to in a foregoing paragraph, had been set for that day. Judd, Yates, Trumbull, Swett, and Davis were there; so also was Lovejoy, who, like Otis of colonial fame, was a flame of fire. The firm of Lincoln and Herndon was represented by both members. in person. The gallant William H. Bissell, who had ridden at th as one of the Presidential electors, canvassed the State, making in all about fifty speeches. He was in demand everywhere. I have before me a package of letters addressed to him, inviting him to speak at almost every county seat in the State. Yates wanted him to go to one section of the State, Washburne to another, and Trumbull still another; while every cross-roads politician and legislative aspirant wanted him down in our country, where we need your help. Joshua R. Giddings wrote him wor
ank Commissioner of Illinois under appointment of Governor Bissel, and that if he would request my retention in office by Yates, the incoming Governor, I should be satisfied. He made the necessary recommendation, and Governor Yates complied. I wasGovernor Yates complied. I was present at the meeting between Yates and Lincoln, and I remember that the former, when Lincoln urged my claims for retention in office, asked Lincoln to appoint their mutual friend A. Y. Ellis postmaster at Springfield. I do not remember whether LiYates and Lincoln, and I remember that the former, when Lincoln urged my claims for retention in office, asked Lincoln to appoint their mutual friend A. Y. Ellis postmaster at Springfield. I do not remember whether Lincoln promised to do so or not, but Ellis was never appointed. he said, with a significant lowering of his voice. Give our clients to understand that the election of a President makes no change in the firm of Lincoln and Herndon. If I live I'm com V. Sumner and other army gentlemen were also in the car, and some friends of Mr. Lincoln--among them 0. H. Browning, Governor Yates, and ex-Governor Moore--started with the party from Springfield, but dropped out at points along the way. The day was
nor. The largest vote was for Norman B. Judd, of Chicago, his strength in the main being the northern part of the State. I was next in order of strength, and Richard Yates the third, but the divisions were not materially unequal. The result was Yates was nominated, his strength being about Springfield and Jacksonville, extendingYates was nominated, his strength being about Springfield and Jacksonville, extending to Quincy on the west, and mine was at Bloomington and vicinity and south and southeast. These divisions were kept up a while after Mr. Lincoln's election, and were considered in the distribution of Federal patronage. A vacancy in the United States Senate occurred early in 1861 by the death of Stephen A, Douglas, and GovernorGovernor Yates appointed Oliver H. Browning, of Quincy, to fill the vacancy. There was also a vacancy upon the Supreme Bench of the United States to be filled from this general vicinity by Mr. Lincoln in the early part of his administration, and Judge Davis, of Bloomington, and Mr. Browning, of Quincy, were aspirants for the position. M
reakfasted with him. The young man had just returned from the capitulation of Lee, and he described in detail all the circumstances of that momentous episode of the close of the war, to which the President listened with the closest interest. After breakfast the President spent an hour with Speaker Colfax, talking about his future policy, about to be submitted to his Cabinet. At eleven o'clock he met the Cabinet. General Grant was present. He spent the afternoon with Governor Oglesby, Senator Yates, and other friends from Illinois. He was invited by the manager of Ford's theatre, in Washington to attend in the evening a performance of the play, Our American cousin, with Laura Keene as the leading lady. This play, now so well known to all play-goers, in which the late Southern afterward made fortune and fame, was then comparatively unheralded. Lincoln was fond of the drama. Brought up in a provincial way, in the days when theatres were unknown outside of the larger cities, the b
the civilian army to their homes. It was no use; there they stayed till the storms and blasts of approaching winter forced them to say a last good-by and retreat. In many cases, it was literally the last farewell, for the fate of war bore many of the officers and men to that unknown land from which there is no returning. So time moved on. One day word came that a company stationed at Big muddy bridge had completed their three months service and declined to renew their enlistment. Governor Yates urged them to re-enlist, but to no avail. A special train was ordered, and General John A. McClernand, who was in command of the First Brigade, composed of the 22d, 27th, 30th, and 31st Regiments, was directed to go up there and to take Colonel John A. Logan and see if they could not persuade the men to remain in the service. One bright morning our party set out. Arriving at the bridge sixty miles above Cairo, on the Illinois Central Railroad, we got off the train and wandered about th
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