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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
ollowing members were in line: Crenshaw Battery.—Captain Thomas Ellett, Captain William G. Crenshaw, Lieutenant E. G. Hollis, Sergeants T. T. Johnson, B. W. Vass, Walter J. Ratcliffe, Hugh D. Smith, John R. Redford, Corporals W. T. Ratcliffe and E. S. Ferneyhough, privates Thad. M. Jones, Thomas G. Walker, D. W. Gibson, John Walker, George E. Ware, E. L. Nuckols, John Lewis, Jeff. Ruffin, W. P. Morgan, W. R. Johnson, William Ellis Jones, J. C. Goolsby, William D. Snead, R. C. Walden, Charles P. Young, and M. T. Rider. Purcell Battery.—Privates Thomas Byrne, James Stywater, R. T. Totty, Joseph Uren, Valentine Brown, J. W. D. Farrar, E. M. Cayce, John T. Callaghan, B. F. Hackman, and D. S. Redford. Letcher Battery.—Major Thomas A. Brander, Lieutenant John Tyler, Corporal D. S. Cates, privates F. Kell, James T. Ferriter, and C. T. Outland. Fredericksburg Battery.—Privates E. T. Chesley, H. Cabell Tabb, and John Ferneyhough. Staff.—Captain W. Gordon McCabe. Sons of Vet
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
nemy's lines. The wheel driver, however (Chew Coleman, of Spotsylvania, by name), kept his seat, although next to the exploded chest, and the heat set fire to his jacket, which burned through to the skin, and, notwithstanding the flesh was crisping up, and he was suffering the most excruciating pain, he did not let go the reins, but stopped the horses, thereby preventing them from taking the team into the enemy's lines. He then fell or jumped from his horse nearly exhausted. While this was going on two or three of the cannoneers jumped between the exploded ammunition chest (which was now harmless) and the one on fire and unlimbered it and got out of the way before the fire communicated with the powder, which occurred two or three seconds after, when up went the other two chests with a terrific noise. These I regard as the bravest exploits that came under my observation in the four years of the war—from Bethel to Appomattox. Charles P. Young, Late of Crenshaw Battery, C. S.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
of the guns rolled off right in the main road. This was an unfortunate time for an accident, but no one was hurt, and off we bounded into the field where the other guns were at work, meeting at the same time some of the wounded, among them Charles P. Young, and others. That night (this was July 1st) we moved around to the right, followed by the other companies of the battalion, and took a position on the line of what was once a stone wall, which ran for some distance on a hill which gave us aleasants, who lost a leg; Hix, and others whose names I do not now recall. General John Pegram, who was killed here, was a brother to Colonel William J. Pegram, who commanded the Pegram Battalion. After the battle was over, in company with Charles P. Young, another member of the company, I went out to survey the field from which we had driven the enemy, and as it was now night, we soon found that we had passed beyond our pickets, and were in the lines of the Yankees, as we heard them calling o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Crenshaw Battery, (search)
History of Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Third Corps, army of Northern Virginia—With a roster of the Company. This famous organization participated in forty-eight Engagements and many skirmishes. Written by Private Charles P. Young, and Revised by Captain Thomas Ellett, thirty-eight years after close of the war. On Friday, March 14, 1862, there assembled at the wholesale warehouse of Messrs. Crenshaw & Co., on the Basin bank, between Tenth and Eleventh streets, Richmond, Va., one of the jolliest, most rollicking, fun-loving crowd of youngsters, between the ages of 16 and 25, that were ever thrown together haphazard, composed of clerks, book-keepers, salesmen, compositors, with a small sprinkling of solid business men, from Richmond, reinforced with as sturdy-looking a lot of farmer boys from the counties of Orange, Louisa, Spotsylvania and Culpeper as one generally comes across. The occasion of the gathering was the formation of an artillery company for ac