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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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the field. Major Graves, chief of artillery, fell mortally wounded in the arms of Captain Slocomb. The staff of General Adams was also cordially commended. The courage and skill of Colonel Gibson was gratefully mentioned by Breckinridge and D. H. Hill. The brigade entered the battle with 120 officers, and lost in killed and wounded 33; with 1,200 enlisted men, and lost in killed and wounded and missing 396. It drove the enemy from two batteries and captured about 600 prisoners. Colonel Von Zinken reported a loss of 1 24, and mentioned the bravery of Capt. E. M. Dubroca, acting major, and Color-bearer J. Foster. Colonel Gober of the Sixteenth, lost 107 out of his 293 in battle at midday, and three officers—Lieutenant Oliver killed and Captain Ford and Lieutenant Walton missing. Walton was last seen urging his men to follow him against the foe. Captain Kennedy reported the loss in killed of Lieuts. R. W. Cater and W. T. Williams, in addition to the gallant Loudon Butler, and 25
hold the Chattahoochee, the retreat across it, the relief of General Johnston by Gen. John B. Hood, and the fierce battles of Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, and Ezra Church, July 20th to 28th. During these operations Gibson's brigade was in the division commanded by General Clayton, Stewart having corps command until S. D. Lee arrived, July 27th. Gibson's brigade took part in the attack from the intrenchments on the 22d; and on the 28th, according to General Gibson's report, was led by Colonel Von Zinken against the enemy strongly posted, where the men fought gallantly and lost heavily. Lieut.-Col. Thomas Shields and Maj. Charles J Bell, of the Thirtieth, fell at the head of the regiment, the former with the colors in his hands within a few feet of the enemy's breastworks. Lieut. W. B. Chippendale, of the same gallant regiment, was killed and Captain Becnel mortally wounded. Lieut. W. J. Clark, Nineteenth, and Lieut. W. G. Jeter, Fourth, and Capt. W. H. Sparks, First, were killed, a