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's resources and theory. letter to President Davis. the Confederate line. Zollicoffer and Buckner. Buckner seizes Bowling Green. Federal alarm. Confederate adve under Polk, 11,000 troops (estimated); under Buckner, 4,000 men; and under Zollicoffer, 4,000 more. The whole force in Zollicoffer's district of East Tennessee coZollicoffer's district of East Tennessee consisted nominally of ten regiments of infantry, seventeen companies of cavalry, and a six-gun battery of six-pounders; but only five regiments, the artillery, and twree corps already mentioned: Polk at Columbus, Buckner at Bowling Green, and Zollicoffer at Cumberland Gap. The enemy was much the stronger, and was operating on interior lines. It was desirable to strengthen the centre; but Zollicoffer required all of his little army for the service in which he was employed, and more too. Its destroy all the bridges East and West from Knoxville, and then to turn upon Zollicoffer, while in the passes of the Cumberland Mountains, and, by getting between hi
rate with the movements of the enemy in my front; his force should be much greater for these purposes. The measures adopted at Columbus render that place comparatively secure from any immediate attempt of the enemy. The position of General Zollicoffer on the Cumberland holds in check the meditated invasion and hoped — for revolt in East Tennessee, but I can neither order Zollicoffer to join me here, nor withdraw any more force from Columbus, without imperiling our communications toward Zollicoffer to join me here, nor withdraw any more force from Columbus, without imperiling our communications toward Richmond, or endangering Tennessee and the Mississippi Valley. This I have resolved not to do, but have chosen, on the contrary, to post my inadequate force in such a manner as to hold the enemy in check, guard the frontier, and hold the Barren till the winter terminates the campaign; or, if any fault in his movements is committed, or his line become exposed where his force is developed, to attack him as opportunity offers. If the campaign closes without any striking success to their arms,
his force. Mill Spring. Fishing Creek. Confederate strength. Crittenden's night-march. attack. Walthall and battle. curious incident. strenuous combat. Zollicoffer's death. the retreat. the Federals follow,. Crittenden gets across the River. deplorable plight of the Confederates. their retreat. the losses. ZollicoffZollicoffer's body. Slanders on Crittenden. disparity in arms. General Johnston's considerate treatment of Crittenden. Thomas's movements. the movement of the Federal army, which had been frustrated in November, was renewed with better success early in January. General Johnston was now confronted by Halleck in the West, and by Buell Donelson and Henry. Buell's right wing also menaced Donelson and Henry, while his centre was directed against Bowling Green, and his left was advancing against Zollicoffer at Mill Spring on the Upper Cumberland. If this last-named position could be forced, the way seemed open to East Tennessee by either the Jacksboro or the James
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Holding Kentucky for the Union. (search)
occupied Paducah. A few days afterward General Zollicoffer advanced with four Confederate regiment the 17th of October, Garrard reported that Zollicoffer was advancing in force, and asked for reinf the 33d Indiana, in time to help in giving Zollicoffer, who had attacked vigorously with two regimeep to himself. The notion that Buckner or Zollicoffer contemplated an advance, which so frequentlgon train, sent on a foraging expedition by Zollicoffer, was on a road about six miles from the camght on the 18th in the following order: General Zollicoffer's brigade, consisting of two cavalry coally beyond his left. Before Fry's arrival Zollicoffer had deployed his brigade, and had forced Woballs. It was soon ascertained that it was Zollicoffer himself who had fallen. In the mean time, s battery and Kenny's remaining Brig.-Gen. Felix K. Zollicoffer, C. S. A. From a photograph. gunsppi (Lieutenant-Colonel E. C. Walthall), of Zollicoffer's brigade, which had led the attack on Fry [6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
four thousand ill-armed and ill-equipped troops at Cumberland Gap under General Zollicoffer, guarding the only line of railroad communication between Virginia and Tefense, requiring, as it did, constant vigilance and repression. besides Zollicoffer's force, General Johnston found only 4000 men available to protect his [whol Secretary of War, on Christmas day, from Bowling Green: the position of General Zollicoffer on the Cumberland holds in check the meditated invasion and hoped — for revolt in East Tennessee; but I can neither order Zollicoffer to join me here nor withdraw any more force from Columbus without imperiling our communications toward enter was directed against Bowling Green, and his left was advancing against Zollicoffer at Mill Springs, on the upper Cumberland. If this last-named position couldthe campaign opened with the defeat of the Confederates under Crittenden and Zollicoffer, January 19th, 1862, by General Thomas, at Mill Springs, or Fishing Creek.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
ssippi Valley States, urged me to consent to be transferred from the Army of the Potomac to the command of the Confederate forces at Columbus, Kentucky, within the Department of Kentucky and Tennessee, under the superior command of General Albert Sidney Johnston,--a transfer which he said Mr. Davis would not direct unless it was agreeable to me, but which was generally desired at Richmond because of the recent crushing disaster at Mill Springs, in eastern Kentucky: the defeat and death of Zollicoffer. Against the monitions of some of my friends at Richmond, and after much hesitation and disinclination to sever my relations with such an army as that of the Potomac, but upon the assurance that General Johnston's command embraced an aggregate of at least seventy thousand men of all arms, which, though widely scattered, might, by virtue of the possession of the interior lines, be concentrated and operated offensively, I gave Colonel Pryor authority to inform Mr. Davis of my readiness to
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Characteristics of the armies (search)
crushing Confederate defeat at Mill Spring, Kentucky, January 19th, 1862. Here the idol of the Tennesseeans, General Felix K. Zollicoffer, was killed, and his command put to utter rout. I was living fully one hundred and fifty miles south of this g to the Confederates. Not only was their army defeated, but utterly routed and broken up, and its commander killed. Zollicoffer's death was tragic. At first, the action seemed favorable to the Southern troops, and Zollicoffer advanced at the heaZollicoffer advanced at the head of his men. He was in advance, and came upon a Kentucky (Federal) regiment in a piece of woods. The commander of this regiment, Colonel Fry, shot Zollicoffer dead, and his body fell into their hands. This victory was the first considerable UnionZollicoffer dead, and his body fell into their hands. This victory was the first considerable Union victory of the war. After that, the magnitude of the conflict dawned upon the people of the western portion of the Confederacy. It was an eye-opener, and dispelled the delusions they had been cherishing. A month after, Fort Donelson and Nashvi
by officer Stevens, of the Southern District, by order of Major-General Dix, on the charge of being concerned in the raising of a number of men, whose purpose it was to organize themselves into a crew, and take passage on some boat, intending to capture it in the same manner as the St. Nicholas, and then turn her into a pirate.--Baltimore Patriot, August 9. The Nineteenth Regiment of Indiana Volunteers passed through Philadelphia for the seat of war.--N. Y. Herald, August 9. F. K. Zollicoffer was appointed a brigadier-general in the rebel army, and assigned to the command of the Department of East Tennessee. On assuming his command, he issued a proclamation assuring all who desire peace, that they can have it by quietly and harmlessly pursuing their lawful avocations.--(Doe. 171.) The Massachusetts Fifteenth Regiment, under the command of Colonel Charles Devens, left Camp Scott, Worcester, Mass., for the seat of war. This regiment is armed with the Springfield musket,
ral John E. Wool arrived at Fortress Monroe yesterday morning. He was met at the wharf by Gen. Butler and staff and Col. Dimmick, who escorted him to the Headquarters of Gen. Butler. An order was issued for all officers to report at four o'clock in the afternoon for review and to turn over the command to Gen. Wool. In consequence of a heavy rain, however, the review was postponed until this morning, when Gen. Wool assumed command of the post.--National Intelligencer, August 20. F. K. Zollicoffer, the rebel general at Knoxville, Tennessee, issued an order, expressing his gratification at the increasing evidences of confidence in East Tennessee, and declaring that no act or word will be tolerated calculated to alarm or irritate those who, though heretofore advocating the National Union, now acquiesce in the decision of the State and submit to the authorities of the Government of the Confederate States. --(Doc. 194.) The Twenty-second Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, under th
. Large supplies of army stores have been transported to the rebels' lines by this route. The necessary measures have been taken to stop the traffic.--A regiment has just passed down Pennsylvania avenue, headed by a soldier who lost a leg at the battle of Stone Bridge. He carried his musket strapped to his back. The spectacle excited the greatest enthusiasm among our citizens. The new gunboat Sagamore was launched to-day from Sampson's yard, East Boston, Mass. Her keel was laid sixty days ago.--N. Y. Herald, Sept. 19. Yesterday a skirmish took place between the Home Guard and some of Gen. Zollicoffer's men at Barboursville, Ky., without resulting in any damage. It was resumed to-day, when seven rebels and one of their horses were killed. One of the Home Guards received six wounds, and another was taken prisoner. The Home Guards numbered thirty-seven, and the rebels three hundred.--Two miles of the Covington and Lexington Railroad were torn up yesterday near Cyantheana.
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