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lowing will be the orders of march: General Zollicoffer. Fifteenth Mississippi in advance, Colimportant event of the day was the death of Zollicoffer. Col. Fry of the Fourth Kentucky charged ued two shots; both of them took effect, and Zollicoffer, one of the master-spirits of the rebellioneadily forward to the main road that led to Zollicoffer's encampment on the Cumberland. I shall no within a mile of Zollicoffer's encampment; Zollicoffer is killed and his forces have been whipped move on to this side of the river, but old Zollicoffer, the head devil of the army, ruled, and didf the column, where Generals Crittenden and Zollicoffer sat upon their horses about five hundred yammediately afterward, riding up in front, Gen. Zollicoffer advanced to within a short distance of an, killing the person who first recognized Gen. Zollicoffer. With the most perfect coolness, Gen. Zoerced the body of our gallant leader, and Gen. Zollicoffer fell from his horse a mangled corpse. [29 more...]
s done as far as practicable; but on Tuesday the distribution commenced again, and continued with more or less restrictions, under the eye of the most judicious citizens, until Saturday morning. Tuesday night the wire bridge and railroad bridge across the Cumberland were destroyed in spite of the most earnest and persistent remonstrances of our leading citizens. The wire bridge cost about one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and a large portion of the stock was owned by the lamented Gen. Zollicoffer, and was the chief reliance for the support of his orphaned daughters. The railroad bridge cost two hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and was one of the finest draw-bridges in the country. The scenes which were enacted during the following days up to Monday morning, the twenty-fourth, beggar description. The untiring energy of the Mayor and city authorities, who throughout this whole affair acted with a prudence, zeal and devotion to the city which cannot be too highly commended,
have furnished small personal impulse to poetic flight. No cause for regret in this; they need no imperishable literature to prolong their fame to a busy and forgetful posterity. Their deeds are their fittest memorial. The like may be said of Stonewall Jackson, although his picturesque campaigns have been sung in the vivid, rousing stanzas of Palmer's Stonewall Jackson's way. Yet it remains true that fine feeling has usually been touched by the thought of men now overshadowed, of some Zollicoffer, or Ashby, or Pelham. The greatest figure of the war has received a more enduring commemoration. Indeed, Lincoln has inspired the finest imaginative product of the period. Walt Whitman's mystic dirge, When Lilacs last in the Dooryard Bloom'd, which Swinburne enthusiastically pronounced the most sonorous nocturn ever chanted in the church of the world, though too long for inclusion in this volume, consecrates with power and deep-toned solemnity the death of all who never returned from
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letter from General A. S. Johnston. (search)
erable portion will be armed. When I made the call, I hoped that some might come armed. I cannot now conjecture how many will do so. The call was made to save time, and in the hope that by the time they were organized and somewhat instructed, the Confederate Government would be able to arm them. As at present informed, I think the best effort of the enemy will be made on this line, threatening perhaps at the same time the communications between Tennessee and Virginia, covered by Zollicoffer, and Columbus, from Cairo by the river, and Paducah by land, and may be a serious attack on one or the other, and for this their command of the Ohio and all the navigable waters of Kentucky, and better means of land transportation, give them great facilities of concentration. As my forces at neither this nor either of the other points threatened are more than sufficient to meet the force in front, I cannot weaken either until the object of the enemy is fully pronounced. You now know
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of General Beauregard's service in West Tennessee in the Spring of 1862. (search)
sily turned — position of Bowling Green. At the time, as near as I can now recollect, the Confederate forces immediately disposable by General Johnston were the command at Bowling Green, a little over 23,000 men; the remains of the late General Zollicoffer's division — beaten several weeks before at Mill Spring, Southeastern Kentucky--namely, 5,000 men; Major-General Polk's force at Columbus, nearly 14,000 strong, and the garrison at Fort Donelson, some 3,500 men — that is to say, in all abo more than 15,000 strong, and which I may add was actually not increased to 25,000 men until the morning of the 15th of February, 1862. At the time of your recommendation it is probable that General Floyd, with the 5,000 men remaining after Zollicoffer's defeat, was already under orders for Fort Donelson; and, apparently as the result of your views, General Buckner was detached from the quarter of Bowling Green with a division of about 5,000 men, for the same destination So, from these two s<
een, and his left was advancing against General Zollicoffer at Mill Springs, on the upper Cumberlanberland River, and under the command of General Zollicoffer, who, as I understood the matter, had ber and creek intervened between him and General Zollicoffer. While I was detained in Knoxville, onreceived an official communication from General Zollicoffer, informing me that he had crossed the Cill Springs, and found, to my surprise, General Zollicoffer still on the right bank. He called on the very contingency which my order to General Zollicoffer was intended to obviate. It rained viogressing successfully, when the fall of General Zollicoffer was announced to me. Apprehending disasty of our arms and the untimely fall of General Zollicoffer, who was known and highly esteemed by torces there, the gallant and most estimable Zollicoffer, fell—whence confusion resulted. General C or below the position at Mill Springs. General Zollicoffer may well have believed that he could be[3 more...]
, 76-79. Wilmer, Bishop, 634. Wilmington, N. C. Harbor defense, 171. Wilson, General, 131, 544, 592. Gen. J. H., 354, 594, 595, 596. Winchester, Va., Battle of, 449-50. Federal troops routed, 367. Winder, Capt. C. B., 419. Gen. Charles S., 90-91, 93, 94, 95. Death, 266. Act of heroism, 266-67. Gen. John H., 10, 418, 505-06. Winslow, Captain, 214. Winston, Col. 358. Wirz, Major, Henry, 505. Trial and execution, 417-18. Vindication, 418-20. Wise, Lieutenant, 575. Gen. Henry A., 122, 133, 575. Withers, General, 51. Wofford, General, 454. Wolford, Col. Frank., 397. Wood, Col., John Taylor, 188, 222, 576, 589, 590, 595. Woods, General, 36. Wool, General, 69, 74, 82, 497-98. Woolley, Col. R. W., 30. Worth, Jonathan, 624. Protest of validity of election of North Carolina, 625. Worthington, Col., Thomas, 52. Wright, General, 301. Wyndham, Col., Percy, 92. Y Yorktown. Evacuation, 78. Z Zollicoffer, Gen. Felix K., 15, 16, 18, 19, Death, 17.
weather. But Colonel Pryor, notwithstanding the objections raised against the purpose of his mission, represented that General Beauregard's presence in the West was necessary to revive public confidence, then very much shaken by the defeat of Zollicoffer's command at Mill Spring, in eastern Kentucky, and that it would impart activity and efficiency to our operations. He also made a statement—the truth of which, he said, was vouched for by the Acting Secretary of War, Mr. Benjamin—that the eff which insured, in the future, complete harmony and effectual co-operation between them. At General Beauregard's request, he made a succinct review of the situation in his department, and showed much anxiety when referring to the effects of Zollicoffer's late disaster at Mill Spring. General Buell had advanced his forces, numbering from seventyfive to eighty thousand men, to within forty miles of Bowling Green, at Bacon Creek, on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad; General Grant was at Ca
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
t 6. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17. Occupation of Knoxville, Tenn., September 1. Expedition to Cumberland Gap September 4-9. Rheatown September 12. Kingsport September 18. Bristol September 19. Zollicoffer September 20-21. Jonesborough September 21. Hall's Ford, Watauga River, September 22. Carter's Depot and Blountsville September 22. Blue Springs October 10. Henderson's Mill and Rheatown October 11. Blountsville October 14. ps, to April, 1864. Service. Burnside's Expedition over Cumberland Mountains into East Tennessee August 17-October 17, 1863. Occupation of Knoxville, Tenn., September 2. Action at Kingsport September 18. Bristol September 19. Zollicoffer September 20-21. Hall's Ford, Watauga River, September 22. Carter's Depot and Bluntsville September 22. Blue Springs October 10. Henderson's Mills and Rheatown October 11. Blountsville October 14. Bristol October 15. At Ro
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
from Louisville to Glasgow July 27-August 8. Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17. Occupation of Knoxville, Tenn., September 2. Rheatown September 12. Kingsport September 18. Bristol, Va., September 19. Zollicoffer September 20-21. Jonesborough September 21. Hall's Ford, Watauga River, September 22. Carter's Depot and Blountsville September 22. Blue Springs October 10. Henderson's Mill October 11. Rheatown October 11. Blountsville Ochio, July 21, 1863. Dixon July 29 (Co. E ). Burnside's Campaign in East Tennessee August 16-October 17. Occupation of Knoxville September 2. Action at Greenville September 11. Kingsport September 18. Bristol September 19. Zollicoffer September 20-21. Carter's Depot September 20-21. Jonesborough September 21. Hall's Ford, Watauga River, September 22. Carter's Depot September 22. Blue Springs October 10. Henderson's Mill and Rheatown October 11. Blountsv
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