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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
, Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee. General Zollicoffer had been sent to Knoxville by the Confeas the opportunity offered. In the centre, Zollicoffer only occupied East Tennessee, but was prepand. During this time, as we have stated, Zollicoffer was preparing to defend Eastern Tennessee b ravines. After one month of inactivity, Zollicoffer made an attempt to surprise the Federal came battery, about three thousand men in all, Zollicoffer only arrived in front of the Federal positi apprised of the approach of the enemy. If Zollicoffer had attacked him on the 20th, he would problt perfectly prepared. Towards two o'clock Zollicoffer renewed the attack on their right, and the ll defended, before an imaginary foe. While Zollicoffer was quietly resting in the valley of the Cutrenched camp. In that position he covered Zollicoffer to the eastward, who had taken position in to make a threatening demonstration against Zollicoffer on the borders of the Cumberland. McCook, [1 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—the first winter. (search)
operations were possible in that region. It was some time after the check he had experienced at Wild Cat camp, that Zollicoffer, leaving Barboursville, had proceeded to occupy the important position of Mill Spring. Mr. Davis, although displeased enden resolved to forestall the movements of his adversary. He started for Logan Cross-roads with the two brigades of Zollicoffer and Carroll and a battery of artillery, forming all together an effective force of from five to six thousand. He was the first fire of the Confederates; its left rested upon a hill whose summit was opened and exposed, and towards which Zollicoffer, who led his brigade valiantly, directed all his efforts. It was on the point of being carried; but the brigade of Caal changed the aspect of the fight; the belligerents came to close quarters, and in the midst of the melee Fry met General Zollicoffer, whom he shot dead on the spot with his pistol. On seeing their commander fall the Confederates became disconcert
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book V:—Tennessee. (search)
pping to avenge him. Finally, after following for a considerable distance a road adjoining the frontier line of Virginia and Tennessee, Carter reached Blountsville at eleven o'clock on the morning of the 30th. The object of his expedition was now evident; it was the destruction of the railway which passed near this village. Consequently, his march was accelerated as he approached this objective point. He proceeded toward a station formerly called Union, which the Confederates had named Zollicoffer, as the former appellation clashed with their political prejudices. It was guarded by three hundred mounted men, under Major McDowell. This officer, having but an indefinite idea of the approach of the enemy, and not wishing to believe the report, was proceeding alone in search of information regarding the Blountsville road, when he was met by General Carter, marching with an escort in advance of his column. McDowell was captured; and finding the Federals in such force, he sent to his
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
Cluke, seeing his retreat cut off, returns to Mount Sterling, captures the small Union garrison which occupied this point, and on the 20th of March, forcing his way through the troops that have been sent in pursuit of him, gains, by another route, the inaccessible plateau whence he had emerged. In the mean while, Pegram, who has gathered together the remainder of his cavalry at Monticello, in the upper valley of the Cumberland, has advanced along the road followed the previous year by Zollicoffer, which leads to Danville and Lexington by way of Mill Springs and Somerset. Whilst the Federals are trying to surround Cluke he crosses Cumberland River, and rapidly passes through the village of Somerset, causing a portion of his cavalry to dismount in order to make the inhabitants believe that he has a brigade of infantry with him, and to deceive the Federal spies as to the number of his troops. On the 18th of March his scouts, who have preceded him, appear before Stanford. The Union
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the siege of Chattanooga. (search)
le to attempt to hold him. He left about a hundred and fifty prisoners in the hands of the Federals, who themselves had lost something like a hundred men at Blue Springs and nearly twenty at Henderson's Mill. Foster's guilty neglect had saved Williams. Burnside urged his infantry no farther. But Shackelford closely pursued Williams, and, crossing the Watauga, attacked Ransom at Blountsville on the 14th. After a feeble resistance the Confederates fell back on the station named Union or Zollicoffer, which they had fortified since its destruction in the previous winter by the Federal cavalry. They promptly abandoned it, with a considerable amount of rolling stock, and the Unionists pushed on into Virginia. While Ransom was falling back on Abingdon, Shackelford was at last retracing his steps, systematically destroying all the railway-line beyond Jonesborough. The limits of the occupation were extended as far as that town, where Shackelford left a portion of his force. Willcox wit
rg papers of yesterday confirm the rumor of Nelson's having been captured, but give no other details than that he was taken in the mountains of Virginia, while making his way to the Federal Congress, to which he claimed to have been recently elected. A friend in Lynchburg has kindly furnished as with some of the details of his capture. He was prowling among the mountains in Lee county, Virginia, with an escort of three or four friends, when he was captured by a scouting party from Gen. Zollicoffer's command. He said he was on his way to Washington, but, as he must have known that the Washington Congress would have adjourned before he could have reached there, the general impression is, that he was engaged in some nefarious plot, having for its object the introduction into Eastern Tennessee of foreign mercenaries. He is new under a strong guard at Abingdon, Virginia, and future disclosures may involve him in treasonable practices against the peace and welfare of the Southern Con
dishonor. Let not the Union men of the late contest at the ballot-box, among whom I personally know so many to be patriotic and true men, be carried along by excitement or passion into so deplorable an extreme. Though differing upon the late political questions, we are all Tennesseans. For the honor and glory of Tennessee let us be, as heretofore, shoulder to shoulder in battle, or peacefully at home, not sorrowing when victory perches on the standards of Tennessee regiments. F. K.Zollicoffer, Brig. Gen. Com'dg. Blood for blood. The following communication appears in the Charleston Mercury, of the 7th instant: We do not say "a tooth for a tooth," or "an eye for an eye," because the "authority" by which these expressions are furnished has long since been exploded, and the higher law doctrine prevails in its stead; but we will say, and do say, "blood for blood," and to the bitter end we sustain this principle! Why waste time with the courtesies of war, when we ar
on of the Confederate States, have closed the door to all forbearance with the minions of Andrew Johnson in East Tennessee. Sitting in the Senate of the United States, Johnson sits as a traitor, and a reward should be offered for his head. Gen. Zollicoffer is taking measures now with his drill sergeants, which ought to have been taken two months ago, and which will put a speedy and to a defection which would never have had any front, if its few leaders had been properly dealt with at the beginliticians, has become the policy of an entire region. Noxious seeds can never be left unmolested, to germinate and fructify with impunity. The hour of indulgence and toleration has passed for Toryism in the South; and untrue men should nowhere be left free to spread the work of mischief and defection. They should at least be apprehended and deprived of the power of working harm. That is the policy of General Zollicoffer, and that should be the policy of every officer throughout the South.
nessee. Knoxville, Aug. 18th, 1861. Affairs in East Tennessee are becoming more settled. Mr. G. W. Bridges, who was elected to the Northern Congress from the Third District, was arrested near the Kentucky line, brought here, and has been released by Gen. Zollicoffer, after proper acknowledgment or his allegiance, &c. The only danger now apprehended is, that of an invading army via Kentucky, and of that our authorities are fully advised. Gen. Zollicoffer will not be caught unprepared. nessee. Knoxville, Aug. 18th, 1861. Affairs in East Tennessee are becoming more settled. Mr. G. W. Bridges, who was elected to the Northern Congress from the Third District, was arrested near the Kentucky line, brought here, and has been released by Gen. Zollicoffer, after proper acknowledgment or his allegiance, &c. The only danger now apprehended is, that of an invading army via Kentucky, and of that our authorities are fully advised. Gen. Zollicoffer will not be caught unprepared.
he had been engaged. The Administration at Washington has shown more weakness, vanity and presumption in its refusal to exchange prisoners, than we had supposed it capable of it has planted itself upon an abstraction — could not exchange prisoners because that not would be an acknowledgment of the existence of the Southern Confederacy. This is tomfoolery, and a stickling for dignity and etiquette, that can only render them ridiculous. There is such a thing as a Southern Confederacy, or Southern Party, or Southern Army, or whatever we may choose to call them, with 200,000 troops in the field, and they made themselves felt at Manassas, to such an extent, as to at least entitle them to be regarded as belligerents, and an organization that the Washington Government might afford to exchange prisoners with!" There is some hope for Brownlow. With the aid of time, repentance, reflection, Beauregard, McCulloch and Zollicoffer, he may be licked into decency.--Charleston Courier.
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