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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 2 0 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
. Whipple, A. A. G. and Chief of Staff, Dept. of the Cumberland. Zzz Hdqrs. Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., our right. My division was at that time constituted as follows: Zzz Narrative. May 7, leaving Colonel Este's brigade (the Third effective force is here given, taken from the reports of July 4: Zzz Effective force of division-officers, 299; enlisted men, 5,430; during the campaign from the 7th of May to the 7th of September: Zzz This loss of 1,225 officers and men is to be compared not with ce of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, September 2, 1864. Zzz The division captured during the four months 908 men, includinnding Divisiono Capt. A. C. Mcclurg, Assistant Adjutant-General. Zzz Hdqrs. Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, September 2, 1864. d report of casualties in the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, July, 1864. Zzz A. Baird, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
he locality of the division was not changed. Our works were at this time so close to those of the enemy that no man on either side dared show his head during the day, and the only advantage which we gained was in the constant pushing forward of our trenches toward theirs, done under the cover of night. To exhibit the changes which had taken place in the division up to this period and its subsequent strength, a new table of effective force is here given, taken from the reports of July 4: Zzz Effective force of division-officers, 299; enlisted men, 5,430; total, 5,729; horses, 125; guns, 8. July 3, the enemy having again abandoned his works and fallen back during the night, my men entered them before daybreak and were prompt in pursuit, capturing a large number of prisoners. We marched at an early hour, and, passing through Marietta, had advanced about two miles along the right side of the railroad when we came upon a new line of works in which the rebel army had taken p
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Battle of Jonesborough. (search)
over a great length of time, yet equal in the aggregate the casualties of the greatest battles. The following report exhibits the total loss of the division in killed and wounded during the campaign from the 7th of May to the 7th of September: Zzz This loss of 1,225 officers and men is to be compared not with the aggregate effective force of 8,460 men with which we entered upon the campaign, but with a much smaller average in the field, as the time of many regiments soon expired, reduce of 4,840 officers and men. The following table of effective force, made since the close of the campaign, may be profitably compared with that of the 7th of May: Effective force of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, September 2, 1864. Zzz The division captured during the four months 908 men, including 61 officers. One hundred and forty-seven of these desired to be sent to the rear and classed as deserters, the rest as prisoners of war. It will be seen by this that while the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
cond line moving at the same time, with the proper interval. Shortly after the brigade had arrived at the top of the hill it was observed that General Hascall's brigade, of General Judah's division, was moving in a double line of battle to the front, on a line of direction which brought it upon the rear of this brigade. Not understanding the nature of the movement, our lines stood fast until General Hascall's front line had passed our front line and his rear line our rear line. See map: Zzz At this time General Baird gave the order that this brigade should advance as General Hascall's brigade advanced, and the troops were immediately ordered forward, advancing in the order they had assumed. The face of the country was very rough, rising and falling in a succession of high hills and deep gorges, covered with an almost impenetrably dense growth of timber, rendering it a very difficult matter for troops to advance in line. On reaching the second line of hills we passed our
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 164 (search)
line officers and enlisted men who deserve special mention, but the limits of this report will only allow me to respectfully refer to the reports of regimental commanders. When the brigade left Ringgold the effective force numbered 2,549. Two regiments, the Ninth Ohio and Thirty-fifth Ohio, have left the brigade on account of the expiration of their term of service. The Second Minnesota is still absent. Effective force present in four regiments, 1,120. Casualties of four regiments: Zzz The casualties of the Second Minnesota and Thirty-fifth Ohio Regiments will bear a proportional average with the above regiments, including 1 officer in each regiment killed. The members of the brigade staff-Capt. Clinton A. Cilley, acting assistant adjutant-general; Capt. Samuel L'Hommedieu, assistant inspector-general; Capt. Sanford Fortner, provost-marshal; Capt. M. D. Ellis, topographical engineer; Lieut. C. C. Colborn, acting aide-de-camp; Lieut. W. H. Osborn, acting commissary of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 165 (search)
egiment since last report; also a statement of the strength of regiment May 7, 1864, and casualties since that time. I do not consider it necessary to mention the marches, &c., of this regiment that were performed jointly with the command, and under your immediate observation. That omitted, leaves but the operations of August 31 and the morning of September 1, 1864, to report. During that time this regiment was connected with the expedition under command of Colonel Hunter, of the Eighty-second Indiana, which had for its object the destruction of the railroad between Atlanta and Macon, Ga. That object was successfully and efficiently accomplished, this regiment taking an active part, laboring without any intermission in building fortifications and in destroying the railroad track, until ordered to rejoin the command. The effective strength of this regiment was- Zzz C. J. McCOLE, Major, Commanding Regiment. Captain Cilley, Assistant Adjutant-General. Second Brigade.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 167 (search)
our front. Here we lost several men killed and wounded. August 13, took up a new position one mile to the right and fortified. Remained here until August 27, when we took up line of march in the direction of Jonesborough, Ga. During this march we intrenched ourselves in seven different positions. Near Jonesborough, Ga., September 1, we were a part of the column which supported the charge by the Fourteenth Army Corps, but did not become engaged. Remained near Jonesborough until September 6, when we fell back by short marches to this point, where we arrived September 8, 1864. During the whole campaign of 118 days, ending with the capture of Atlanta, we have not been out of hearing of hostile firing twelve hours at a time. Our entire loss is 4 killed, 38 wounded, and I captured. Very respectfully, Thos. Doan, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Zzz Thos. Doan, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. [Capt. S. Fortner, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 170 (search)
ngaged with those of the enemy, inflicting upon them considerable loss, and losing as follows: Zzz Before break of day of the morning of the 16th instant the pickets of our brigade, under ch less skillful in arms than they were discreet. The losses of the brigade at this point were: Zzz June 5, the rebels evacuated their works, brigade moving immediately forward, and on the 10ty evacuated their position in front of the right of our army. The losses of the brigade were: Zzz On the 1.9th instant the brigade moved forward in support of the division, skirmishers drivipaign, but resulted in comparatively small loss, being as follows from the 20th to the 26th:-- Zzz On the 26th we moved to the right, and on the 27th were put in position to support the assauir boats and bridges behind them. Our losses from the 2d to the 9th of July, inclusive, were: Zzz During the evening the brigade enjoyed a much-needed rest on the north bank of the Chattahoo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 175 (search)
nsin Battery, Capt. G. Q. Gardner, with the Second Division, Capt. C. M. Barnett, chief of artillery; Seventh Indiana Battery, Capt. O. H. Morgan, and the Nineteenth Indiana-Battery, Lieut. William P. Stackhouse, with Third Division, Capt. George Estep, chief of artillery. The following table exhibits the effective force of the batteries of the Fourteenth Army Corps on the morning of the 5th day of May, at the commencement of the campaign, and on the 5th day of September, at its close: Zzz The first gun of the campaign was fired near Tunnel Hill May 7, at 11 a. m., by Battery I, Second Illinois. The batteries of the corps have, with two exceptions, been fought as the corps was fought previous to the 1st of September--that is, by detail, a battery or a battalion at a time-and to give a history of their marches and engagements would be merely to duplicate the reports of the several battery commanders herewith transmitted. The only occasions when the entire artillery force
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
Wood any assistance he may need. 4.40, General Newton trying to get over the open field on General Wood's left, the same field that General Wood is trying to get over. 4.50. sent Wood word that Newton was working up on his left, and Stanley was ordered up in supporting distance in his rear. Wood and Newton could not advance their skirmish lines. The enemy had not abandoned their works on the left (in front of part of Palmer's corps), and at this time the lines were as in diagram below. Zzz 6 p. m., General Thomas ordered artillery to be put in position along our front and to endeavor by fire from same to drive the enemy from the woods beyond the open field in front of Newton. 6.30 p. m., artillery in position, several guns bearing on the salient A, and opened, firing by volley. A terrific fire was kept up for more than half an hour, and then the strong skirmish lines of Wood's and Newton's divisions charged across the open field, drove the enemy from his rifle-pits, and held
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