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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Some Cambridge schools in the olden time. (search)
y one hearer to another, that Mr. Stone was very ill, or Mrs. Tremor bereaved, but that they had a note up. Sometimes the paper contained a suggestion to be acted upon without being read aloud. The note Dr. C. sent was meant to be of this kind. These were the words: There is a slaveholder in my pew; please to cut him up in the last prayer. But to turn from this digression to the public school which, to use Mrs. Burnett's phrase, is the one I knew the best of all, viz., that founded in ZZZ809,. of which I became a member somewhere in the twenties. Though the schoolhouse was a building of two stories, only the lower one was occupied by the school. The outer door opened into a little vestibule where were nails for hanging coats and hats; here too was another door to a stairway with which we had nothing to do. The schoolroom itself — there was but one (a fine contrast to the spacious halls and classrooms of today) was furnished with clumsy desks or tables having a narrow shelf
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), chapter 11 (search)
ur hours between two successive passages of the same star over the meridian, thus gaining about four minutes a day over solar time. This clock is, perhaps, the most important instrument in the observatory, for it is essential to the proper use of Zzz the other instruments. A fine new clock Zzz has been presented to the Observatory recently which will undoubtedly make some of the work easier, possibly even more accurate. On our way out of this building we must step into the library for a mZzz has been presented to the Observatory recently which will undoubtedly make some of the work easier, possibly even more accurate. On our way out of this building we must step into the library for a moment. Here are between seven and eight thousand bound volumes and nearly ten thousand pamphlets. A considerable proportion of these books and pamphlets contain records of observations made at different times all over the world. The Harvard Annals alone fill a long row of thick quarto volumes. Those dry looking pages of statistics contain many interesting secrets for future discovery. Now let us see what are the other buildings. A good sized wooden house at a little distance, serves as