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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 30 (search)
he First Brigade (the Thirty-eighth Illinois) came to our assistance, when the enemy was driven from the field toward the city in confusion. In this skirmish we captured 1 prisoner, killed 2, and wounded 2 of the enemy. Maj. James A. Watson, Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers, rendered efficient services in this affair. This regiment continued with the brigade until the 28th, when we formed line of battle and took position on the Atlanta and Montgomery Railroad, which, on the morning of the 29th, we proceeded to destroy. Three regiments were placed under my command, to wit, Seventy-seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and Thirty-first Regiment Indiana Volunteers, for the execution of the work, and the Seventy-fifth Illinois Volunteers, under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Kilgour, performing their portion of the work to the satisfaction of their division commander. On the 30th moved with the brigade, the Seventy-fifth Illinois in the advance of the whole division, to the junction of the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
dious night's march, we halted about daybreak for breakfast. Formed line of battle at 8 a. m. and commenced fortifying. Moved to the right soon after; marched eight miles and camped on Utoy Creek. August 27, marched at 2 p. m. as rear guard, made about five miles and crossed Camp Creek, going into position on right of General Wood's division; occupied two hills in advance of the line and fortified. Marched at 4 p. m. of 28th about four miles, and camped near Montgomery railroad. On the 29th advanced our lines about half a mile and fortified. August 30, marched at 6 a. m. and crossed the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak. Moved east about six miles and formed line of battle on left of Kimball's division. On the 31st advanced several miles toward Macon railroad, formed line, and fortified three times. About dark [took] position on right of Grose's brigade, and camped. September 1, marched at 7 a. m. and struck Macon railroad near Battle Station; commenced tearing up track and b
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
re allowed to rest till daylight and to get their breakfast. About 7 a. m. Friday, the 26th, our pickets reported some movement among the enemy, which was supposed might indicate an intention to attack, but it resulted in nothing important. At 8 a. m. our movement was continued and kept up throughout the day. Saturday, the 27th, the movement was resumed, and the troops moved steadily around the enemy's left toward his rear. Sunday, the 28th, the West Point railway was reached. Monday, the 29th, my division was engaged in destroying the West Point road. Tuesday, the 30th, the movement was resumed to reach the Macon railway. It was considered certain that the destruction of this last line of his rail communications must inevitably compel the enemy to evacuate Atlanta. Wednesday, the 31st, my division, leading the Fourth Corps, and in conjunction with a division of the Twenty-third Corps, made a strong lodgment on the Macon railroad. Early Thursday morning, September 1, the work o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
, moving south on a neighborhood road in the direction of the West Point railroad to a point near Camp Creek, 6 miles from East Point, where, the cavalry covering our movement meeting with considerable resistance, we halted for the night and barricaded our front. At 6 p. m. on the 28th moved with the division on a road crossing Camp Creek and intersecting the West Point railroad near and north of Red Oak Station, bivouacking on both sides of the road, having marched about three miles. On the 29th, the Second and Third Brigades having been detached for the purpose of assisting in the destruction of the West Point railroad, this brigade took position on the left of Newton's division, our left refused, and built strong barricades. Later in the day the Twentythird Corps came into position on our left. August 30, at 6 a. m. marched with the division, crossing the West Point railroad near Red Oak Station and moving in an easterly direction. About 11 a. m. the brigade was detached from th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 68 (search)
ng of the 27th instant the regiment resumed the march, moving about five miles toward the southeast, halted at noon and constructed a rail barricade, fronting the south. Companies B, F, H, and K, under command of Captain Wiley, were placed on picket duty in front of the brigade. We remained in this position until the evening of the 28th ultimo, when the march was again resumed, and continued until 9 p. m., the direction being south. We bivouacked by the roadside. On the morning of the 29th instant the knapsacks of the men were piled up together, and leaving a light guard with them, the regiment marched to the West Point railroad, about two miles west of East Point, and commenced tearing up the track, burning the ties, and bending the rails. The regiment destroyed about 400 yards of the railroad, and then returned, camping near its location of the previous night. On the morning of the 30th ultimo, we crossed the West Point railroad in our line of march, moving slowly through the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 72 (search)
river. On the 17th the battalion moved down opposite Vining's Station; details from both regiments briskly skirmished with the enemy without loss. That evening the battalion returned to its former position. From the 17th to the 21st of July the battalion was more or less engaged in obtaining the position before Atlanta which it afterward held, with but slight loss, until August 25. On the night of August 25 the battalion joined in the movement to the right and rear of Atlanta; on the 29th ultimo assisting in the destruction of the Montgomery railroad; on the 1st instant marching to Jonesborough, and on the 2d to Lovejoy's Station, where the battalion remained till the night of the 5th, when it joined in the retrograde movement to Atlanta, which place it reached on the 8th instant. But few casualties occurred during this movement, as the battalion was at no time engaged. My thanks are due to Lieutenant-Colonel Bowman, commanding the Ninety-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
rched several miles, and at 3 a. m. bivouacked in rear of the abandoned position of the Twentieth Army Corps. The following morning at 10 o'clock left the position and marched in rear of the army to the right. On the 27th of August the brigade marched to near Camp Creek, and there fortified its position and remained until night of the 28th, when it was detailed to guard the supply train of the corps, and joined the division in its position in the vicinity of the Montgomery railroad. On the 29th the brigade was marched to the railroad to destroy the track. This being successfully and thoroughly accomplished for a considerable distance, the command marched back and bivouacked for the night in rear of the Twentythird Army Corps. On the 30th the command marched in the direction of the Macon railroad, which was reached on the following day. Here a position was assigned to the brigade, which was strongly fortified. On the following morning, September 1, 1864, the brigade marched parall
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 85 (search)
ear Dallas, behind works constructed by pioneers. Eighteen hundred yards in our front was a heavy line of rebel works in which were three batteries. With two of these we were fiercely engaged on the 27th instant. One of the rebel batteries was silenced, notwithstanding our works had been so poorly constructed as to have been entirely torn to pieces and demolished by the shot and shell from the enemy's guns. These were at once fitted up and embrasures put in by the company. On the 28th and 29th and 30th instant the battery was more or less engaged with good effect. On the evening of the 30th it was relieved and placed in camp by order of Captain Bridges. The casualties during this engagement were Privates George Scott, Michael Crawley and James Lindsay, wounded slightly; Isaac Houghtaling and Caleb B. Beers, wounded severely by musket-balls. Four horses were killed, 2 wounded, and 2 caisson wheels disabled. Every effort was required to save men from the enemy's sharpshooters, fo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
next morning. On the 27th the corps remained in camp, awaiting the movements of other commands, cutting roads, &c., preparatory to marching the next morning. At 4 a. m. the 28th the corps moved to Mount Gilead Church, where it passed the Fourth Corps, and taking the advance reached its designated camp near Rough and Ready late in the afternoon. During the day's march Morgan's division had the advance, and skirmished quite lively with the enemy's cavalry at and south of Camp Creek. On the 29th the location of my camp remained unchanged; a part of the troops were kept vigorously at work during the day, destroying the railroad track, making reconnaissances, and cutting roads to facilitate our advance the next morning. On the morning of the 30th, in compliance with instructions from Major-General Thomas, the corps moved at an early hour to Shoal Creek Church, on the neighborhood road, where it bivouacked for a few hours, the troops getting their dinners during the halt. From this po
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 95 (search)
would encumber the headquarters of the division and corps without affording necessary or interesting data. On the 26th of August the Second and Third Brigades were withdrawn from the position they had held before the enemy near Atlanta and marched to a position on the left of the Twenty-third Corps, the Third Brigade having preceded the other two, which position was held till the 28th, when the entire division marched to Red Oak, on the Atlanta, West Point and Montgomery Railroad. On the 29th the Second and Third Brigades were engaged till 2 p. m. in destroying the railroad toward East Point, while the First Brigade made a reconnaissance in the same direction on the right of the railroad and covered the working parties. There was slight skirmishing between the First Brigade and the enemy, resulting in no loss to us. On the 30th the division marched ten miles toward Jonesborough, Ga., and encamped near Mrs. Evans', on the Fayetteville and Atlanta road. On the 31st the division ma
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