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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
James Buchanan, Buchanan's administration on the eve of the rebellion 1 1 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 1 1 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
Russian minister said to me: Make him rest,—he must. No man in Washington can fill his place,— no man, no man. We foreigners all know he is honest. We do not think that of many. Notwithstanding the controversy in which he was engaged, Sumner kept up his interest in ordinary matters of legislation, and was never more active in the details of the business of his committee, which he was about to leave. As to committee or other work, see Congressional Globe for January 19; February 4, 7, 8, 14, 15 (pp. 592, 953, 1013, 1049, 1208-1211, 1253-1255). Among subjects which he treated in debate were the proposed removal of the remains of soldiers from the Arlington cemetery, Dec. 13, 1870 (Works, vol. XIV. pp. 86-88), which he opposed (for this effort Nast sent with his autograph to the senator his picture in Harper's Weekly, Jan. 14, 1871); transportation of supplies in national vessels to France and Germany for the relief of those who had been impoverished in the war between the two
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
ance of Unitarian Women, the Congress of Representative Women, and the Association of Women Ministers and Preachers. January 7. [Boston]. To speak to the Daughters of the American Revolution at the house of Miss Rebecca W. Brown. I had dreaded the meeting, feeling that I must speak of suffrage in connection with the new womanhood, and anticipating a cold or angry reception. What was my surprise at finding my words, which were not many, warmly welcomed! Truly, the hour is at hand! January 8. To speak for Dr. Clisby at Women's Educational and Industrial Union. I had dreaded this, too, fearing not to interest my audience. The occasion was very pleasant to me, and, I think, to them; Mrs. Waters endorsed my estimate of Phillips Brooks as a perfectly disinterested worker. Mrs. Catlin of New York agreed in my praise of Bishop Henry C. Potter on the same grounds; both also spoke well in relation to my most prominent point — emancipation from the slavery of self. January 23. Oh
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
de the prayer that during this year I might not say one uncharitable word, or be guilty of one ungenerous action. January 6. .. My afternoon service at the Women's Educational and Industrial Union. ... The day was very stormy and Mrs. Lee met me at the carriage, offering to excuse me from speaking to the five persons who were in attendance. I felt not to disappoint those five, and presently twenty-three were present, and we had a pleasant talk, after the reading of the short sermon. January 8.... Felt much discouraged at waking, the long vista of work opening out before me, each task calling for some original brain-work, I mean for some special thought worth presenting to an audience. While I puzzled, a thought came to me for this day's suffrage speech: The kingdom cometh not with observation. The silent, gradual, wonderful growth of public sentiment regarding woman suffrage, the spreading sense of the great universal harmony which Christ delivered to us in the words and act
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Twenty-seventh regiment Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
command of Maj. William A. Walker it joined the Army of the Potomac at Cold Harbor June 1, and took part in the movements and engagements of the following days, losing heavily in the assault of June 3, when Major Walker was killed. It was actively engaged under Major Moore before Petersburg June 15 and 18, and took part in the siege until withdrawn from the front August 25. On September 17 it moved to Portsmouth, and those whose term of service had expired left Fortress Monroe on the 23d, and were mustered out at Springfield, Mass., Sept. 29, 1864. The regiment returned to Beaufort, N. C., September 21, and was stationed in the vicinity until the spring of 1865, engaging in service at Plymouth from December 7 to January 8. In March the regiment moved towards Kinston, and was engaged at South West Creek March 8. It remained afterward on duty at New Berne until its muster out, June 26, 1865. Reaching Massachusetts July 7, it was paid off and discharged at Readville July 19, 1865.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers, Book XIV: the Pilgrims at Plymouth (A. D. 1620-1621.) (search)
; and so lots were cast where every man should lie; which was done, and staked out. We thought this proportion was large enough at the first, for houses and gardens to impale them round, considering the weakness of our people, many of them growing ill with colds; for our former discoveries in frost and storms, and the wading at Cape Cod, had brought much weakness amongst us, which increased so every day more and more, and after was the cause of many of their deaths. . . . Monday, the 8th of January, was a very fair day, and we went betimes to work. Master Jones sent the shallop, as he had formerly done, to see where fish could be got. They had a great storm at sea, and were in some danger. At night they returned with three great seals, and an excellent good cod, which did assure us that we should have plenty of fish shortly. This day Francis Billington, having the week before seen from the top of a tree on a high hill a great sea, It is still called Billington Sea. as he t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
oblemen, with one or two French, one or two Austrian, and one Englishman. . . . . In the evening I passed an hour or two with Falkenstein, the head of the library establishment, a man full of knowledge and pleasant qualities, to whom I am under many obligations. We spent the time chiefly in looking over his extraordinary collection of autographs, which is most admirably arranged, and amounts now to about eleven thousand, exclusive of duplicates. I have never seen anything like it. January 8.—I passed—by appointment made according to the court ceremonies — an hour this afternoon with Prince John. Nothing could be more simple and unpretending than his manners. I wanted to see him on account of his knowledge of Dante, of whose Inferno he has printed a translation with very good notes; and during the greater part of the time I was with him he was occupied in showing me the books and apparatus he had collected for the study of the great Italian master. Some of them were quite c<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
t, like a true Carlist as he is, he complains that it should come through the budget, and be distributed through seven years, instead of being given all at once, and without condition. He interested me very much for an hour by the details of his undertaking. His reason for taking his materials for the History of Painting in the Middle Ages from manuscripts entirely, is, that he can in no other way get them quite authentic, while in the manuscripts he can get them with accurate dates. January 8.—We went this evening a little while to Thierry's, by appointment with the Circourts, whom we met there. Thierry himself we found in the same chair and in the same position in which he is always seen, but with the same spirit that raises him above his bodily infirmities. He talked about Manzoni, and repeated long passages of the Adelchi; he talked about the present state of painting in France; and about the Canadians, in whom he takes a great interest, and to whom, for the sake of their
1. — – Gen. Grant vs. Discussion of Gen. Butler, on data from Gen. Grant's report. Army and Navy Journal, vol 3, p. 333. — 1865. Jan. Causes of his removal; his military history and character. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 329. — – Jan. 8. Farewell order. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 332. — – Feb. Speech in Lowell; Fort Fisher. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 377. — – Aug. Quoted about prisoners at Andersonville; in editorial on Wirz trial. Army and Navy Journal, vy; burning of White House. Boston Evening Journal, July 3, 1862, p. 2, col. 2; July 4, p. 4, col. 2. — 1862. July. Telegraph wire cut, stopping news of Peninsular battles. Boston Evening Journal, July 1, 1862, p. 4, col. 2. — 1863. Jan. 7, 8. Naval raid; letter from the U. S. ship Commodore Morris. Boston Evening Journal, Jan. 14, 1863, p. 4, col. 4. White Oak Swamp Bridge, Va. June 13, 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 721. Whiting, Wm. War powers un
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
themselves in favor of immediate State secession, and the early formation of a Confederacy. Mr. Jacob Thompson, secretary of the interior, resigned his office January 8th, as also did Governor Thomas, of Maryland, secretary of the treasury, and General Dix was appointed to the place. The new Cabinet was now composed of Messrs. Bk, Dix, Holt, Toucey, Stanton and King, who served in apparent harmony to the end of the term. The affairs of the United States were in such disorder that on January 8th, the President sent to Congress a message urging its attention to the helplessness of the executive. The treasury was empty and lenders demanded twelve per cen of Jefferson Davis, by declaring their readiness to put the Crittenden resolutions in force, it is reasonable to say that secession would have ceased that day, January 8th, the anniversary of Jackson's victory at New Orleans, from which dates the rise of the United States to political ascendancy. The number five is named because
o Dublin Depot, in December, and he finally abandoned the Kanawha valley. On December 15th, Col. George Crook, of the Thirty-sixth Ohio, sent out a detachment, which scattered the guards left at Meadow Bluff, burned the encampment, and returned after gleaning the livestock of the neighborhood. Raleigh Court House was occupied by a portion of Schenck's brigade, December 28th. The Huntersville line also was abandoned, General Loring leaving a guard of about 250 men, who were scattered on January 8th by an expedition from Huttonsville, which defeated the Confederates despite their gallant stand in two skirmishes, and entering the town, burned the military stores. Thus the year closed with no organized Confederate commands in the State except in the northeast, though Gen. Edward Johnson, commanding the Monterey line, still clung to his mountain post on the border, Camp Alleghany, and held two regiments, Goode's and Scott's, near Monterey. There were some little affairs in the cen
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