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William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 3 3 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 3 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Minor operations of the South Atlantic squadron under Du Pont. (search)
was discovered to be in flames, and just an hour after the beginning of the engagement her destruction was completed by the explosion of her magazine. The artillerymen in the fort did not fire with their usual accuracy, for the Montauk was struck only five times. In descending the river subsequently, she ran upon and exploded a torpedo which blew a hole in her bottom, and she was beached in the mud. Some days later, she was repaired and her efficiency was completely restored. On the 30th of March a more protracted attack was made on the fort by the monitors Passaic, Patapsco, and Nahant, under Commander Drayton. The bombardment lasted eight hours, but, as Drayton said in his report, no injury was done which a good night's work would not repair. After Drayton's bombardment, all attempts on Fort McAllister were abandoned, and the efforts of the squadron were directed wholly to the attack on Charleston. The only event of importance during the remainder of Du Pont's command wa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Land operations against Mobile. (search)
ed iron-clads Tuscaloosa and Huntsville, and the steamers Nashville and Baltic.--editors. under Commodore Ebenezer Farrand. Canby's movement began on the 17th of March. The Sixteenth Corps moved by water from Fort Gaines; the Thirteenth Corps marched from Fort Morgan. Uniting at Danley's Ferry, near the mouth of Fish River, they laid siege to Spanish Fort on the 27th of March. Smith, with Carr's and McArthur's divisions, held the right, and Granger, with Benton's and Veatch's Till March 30th.--editors. divisions and Bertram's brigade, the left of the Federal line. From left to right the defense was upheld by the brigades of Ector, Holtzclaw, and Gibson. By the 8th of April the trenches were well advanced and a bombardment was begun by ninety guns in position, joined by all the gun-boats within range. In the evening a lodgment was effected on the right of the Confederate lines, and during the night the garrison made good its retreat, with the loss of about 500 prisoners capt
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.114 (search)
n the cotton States,--three factories, numerous mills, immense quantities of supplies, capturing four pieces of artillery and several hundred small-arms, near 300 prisoners rejoining the corps; the men in fine spirits and the animals in good condition, having lost in all but four officers and 168 men, half of the latter having been captured at various points, while straggling from foraging parties and not in line of duty. His operations since his separation from the main column, at Elyton, March 30th, covered a skirmish at Trion, Alabama, April 2d; the capture of Tuscaloosa, April 5th, and the destruction of the Military School, together with military stores and public works, at that place. From Tuscaloosa he had returned northward as far as Jasper, recrossed the Black Warrior, and, after destroying the iron works and factories along the route, reached Carrollton, Georgia, on the 25th of April, and soon opened communications with Wilson. On the 13th of April I received notice of th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
e Army of the Cumberland over the mountains was gained. General Burnside, who had been assigned to the command of the Army of the Ohio in March, 1863. taking with him the Ninth Corps, with the expectation of speedily undertaking the liberation of East Tennessee, was now brought into active co-operation with the Army of the Cumberland. There had occurred, now and then, some stirring events in his department, the most important of which was the defeat of Pegram by Gillmore, at Somerset, March 30. the raid of Colonel H. S. Sanders into East Tennessee, June. and the extensive raid of Morgan into Indiana and Ohio, July. already mentioned. Pegram was a Virginian, and crossed the Cumberland Mountains and river with a considerable force of mounted men, professedly the advance of a larger body, under Breckinridge, and commenced plundering Southeastern Kentucky, and expelling Unionists from the State. He was finally attacked in a strong position at Somerset, by General Quincy A. Gillmo
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
in favor of Longstreet, before Suffolk, See page 48. when he marched in force upon New Berne, and with twenty guns attacked an unfinished earth-work on the north side of the Neuse, then held by the Ninety-second New York. Hill was repulsed, when he turned northward, and marched on Little Washington. Foster hastened to the threatened post by water. He left General Palmer in command at New Berne, and sent to General Peck, at Suffolk, for aid. Hill soon invested the place, and on the 30th of March 1863. demanded its surrender. Foster refused, and a siege was begun. Batteries were erected by Hill at commanding points, and in a day or two the little garrison of twelve hundred men was cut off from all communication outside by land or water, excepting through the precarious methods of small boats, with supplies, making their way in the night, or by some bold adventurer, like Captain McDermot, of the gun-boat Ceres, who, on the night of the 3d of April, volunteered to run the blocka
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 19: the repossession of Alabama by the Government. (search)
bile and Montgomery, but Wilson was keeping him too thoroughly occupied in the interior to allow him to leave. The garrison displayed great courage and resolution. It made at least a dozen sorties during the siege. One of them, made on the 30th of March, was a brilliant success. At sunset the bombardment had ceased, when a party of the garrison, under Captain Watson, concealed by the smoke. rushed out over their works and captured Captain Stearns, of the Seventh Vermont, with twenty men, wmotion, to meet the danger. He sent Chalmers by way of Bridgeville toward Tuscaloosa. Hearing of this, March 27, 1865. Wilson put his forces in rapid motion, with ample supplies, for Montevallo, beyond the Cahawba River. Arriving at Elyton, March 30. he directed McCook to send Croxton's brigade to Tuscaloosa for the purpose of burning the public property and destroying founderies and factories there. The adventures of that brigade, which did not rejoin the main body until the expedition ha
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
to appear at the bar; and on the 13th, when the Senate formally reopened, he did so appear, by his counsel, who asked for a space of forty days wherein to prepare an answer to the indictment. Ten days were granted, and on the 23d the President's counsel presented an answer. The House of Representatives, the accuser, simply denied every averment in the answer, when the President's counsel asked for a postponement of the trial for thirty days. They allowed seven days, and on Monday, the 30th of March, the trial began. The examination of witnesses was closed on the 22d of April, and on the following day the arguments of counsel began. These closed on the afternoon of Wednesday, the 6th of May, when the case was submitted to the judgment of the Senate. Its decision was given on the 26th of the same month. Every member of the Senate was present, and voted. Thirty-five pronounced the President guilty, and nineteen declared him not guilty. He escaped legal conviction by one vote.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
? It was only intended to take eight vessels to Shreveport, viz.: the Lexington, Osage, Gazelle, Cricket, Fort Hindman, Juliet, Ouichita and Neosho. These vessels mounted 50 guns, some of them heavy ones. The other vessels that passed the Falls were necessary to guard Grand Ecore, and a sufficient force was left to protect Alexandria. If the Navy delayed the Army, how is it the gun-boats arrived so much ahead of the latter at Grand Ecore? In fact, at any time previous to the 29th or 30th of March, a medium-draft gun-boat and any transport had no difficulty in passing above Alexandria. A hospital boat, belonging to the Marine Brigade, was lost at the Falls, but this was due to the stupidity of her pilot. There was none of the danger that Banks mentions, or anything more than the ordinary accidents likely to occur among so many vessels. No delay was caused by stopping at Alexandria to establish a depot of supplies. The depot was established before Banks arrived, and there was
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
shell pierced the bow casemate on the right of No. 1 gun, mortally wounding the first sponger, who dropped his sponge out of the port on the forecastle. Melloy immediately jumped out, picked it up, and sponged and loaded the gun under a heavy fire from sharp-shooters. Johnson, though very severely wounded himself in the hand, took the sponge from a wounded comrade and continued to use it throughout the action. The casualties in the flotilla were only two killed and eleven wounded. On March 30th, a plan was discovered to blow up by torpedoes all the vessels of the fleet. A Confederate mail carrier was captured, crossing the Mississippi with a mailbag full of official correspondence, in which an atrocious scheme was exposed. It was nothing more nor less than to introduce torpedoes in the shape of lumps of coal into the coal piles or bunkers of the naval and merchant vessels, in hopes that they would be shovelled into the furnaces by the firemen, and there explode. Acts of this k
nd his Excellency appoint abolitionist after free-soiler as our Governor, yet we will continue to lynch and hang, tar and feather and drown, every white-livered abolitionist who dares to pollute our soil. Gov. Reeder, in the early months of 1855, had a census of the Territory taken, which showed a total population of 8,501, whereof 2,905 were voters and 242 slaves. He thereupon ordered an election for a first Territorial Legislature and for certain county officers, to be held on the 30th of March, which took place accordingly. All of border Missouri was on hand; and the invaders had been so nicely apportioned and directed to the several districts and polls that they elected all the members, with a single exception, in either House — the two Free-Soilers being chosen from a remote inland district which the Missourians had overlooked or did not care to reach. Although but 831 legal electors voted, there were no less than 6,320 votes polled. Even at Lawrence, where there were but
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