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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 3 3 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 3 3 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 3 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 2 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 2 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
g to him some estimate of our force. He fell back at once behind his works. We intrenched our line and laid on our arms for the night. May 18, the skirmish line, under Capt. M. B. Clason, of the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio, was advanced at daylight and discovered the enemy's works evacuated. I immediately ordered the One hundred and twenty-first Ohio to occupy North Rome. May 19 to 23, remained in camp near Rome. May 23, crossed at the mouth to the south side of the Etowah River. May 24, marched toward Dallas. May 25, reached Dallas. May 26, no change. May 27, in forming line a gap of two and a half miles was discovered between General Hooker's right and the left of General McPherson. Under orders, I detailed the Thirty-fourth Illinois to find the line and complete the connection between these two wings of the army. The dangerous duty was performed with eminent satisfaction, though the colonel, with a small squad of his men, passed at one time through the enemy's
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 141 (search)
rigade, under command of Col. Dan. McCook, and the enemy's main line of battle, the latter retreated, leaving their dead on the field, and the regiment, with the balance of the brigade, bivouacked for the night one mile north of the town. Next morning we intrenched and then went into camp near by, and there remained until the 23d, when we crossed the river, and, passing through Rome, encamped one mile south of it. Companies D and I were on the 19th detailed to guard wagon train to Resaca. May 24, marched sixteen miles toward Van Wert, and bivouacked for the night at Big Spring. May 25, marched fifteen miles toward Dallas, and, bivouacking for the night, resumed march at an early hour on following morning; reached Dallas at 3 p. m., where we were rejoined by Companies D and I. On the 27th the regiment was on the skirmish line, and, advancing the line one and a half miles, came up to the enemy strongly intrenched on a high hill. Our only loss in the advance was that of Thomas C. Cas
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 144 (search)
r intrenchments. To be prepared for an attack in the morning a light line of works was constructed during the night. During this night the enemy evacuated their works and moved across the Oostenaula River, burning the bridges after them. May 18, early, the Eightyfifth Illinois crossed and occupied the town. May 19, the entire brigade crossed in newly constructed pontoons and encamped in the suburbs of the town, where it remained, doing various military duties, until the morning of the 24th of May, when it marched with the division toward Dallas, reaching that place about noon May 26 and took up position about a half mile to the left of town; remained thus until the next morning, when we moved to the mouth of Gap. Here the brigade was placed in single line, with the One hundred and twenty-fifth Illinois deployed as skirmishers. At about 10 o'clock of the night of the 27th of May the enemy attacked the skirmish line and captured 1 commissioned officer and 14 enlisted men, when a co
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 146 (search)
d the enemy, and a brisk fight ensued. The enemy was routed, and victory was ours. My regiment in this engagement lost 6 men killed and 11 wounded. The loss was light in comparison to the work done. On the following day I marched my regiment with the brigade triumphantly into the city of Rome. To the valor of the Eighty-sixth Illinois belongs a large share of the honor of having wrested from the enemy a very important military point. At Rome. I remained encamped with the brigade until May 24, when the whole brigade resumed its march southward toward Dallas, Ga., where it arrived May 26. From this date to June 15 nothing transpired that would be of any importance in this report. With the exception of changing position, relieving and being relieved on the sirkmish line and following up the enemy, who in the mean time had fallen back .a short distance, nothing occurred. On the 15th of June six companies of my regiment were deployed as skirmishers, and in advancing the lines 2 me
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 148 (search)
new field of labor. An expedition to Rome, Ga., was fitted out for our division, and on the morning of the 15th [16th] the regiment was detailed, with one section of Battery I, Second Illinois Artillery, to command and guard the division supply and ordnance train, in rear of the marching column of the division, to that city. The regiment took no part in the fight at Rome on the 17th; arrived with its important charge on the following day. Remained at Rome doing various duty until the 24th day of May, when the entire division took up its line of march toward Dallas; joined the Army of the Tennessee, to which the division was temporarily attached, near the last-named place on the 26th day of May. The next encounter with the enemy was at Dallas, on the night of the 27th of May, when we were attacked by a superior force while engaged in relieving the Twenty-second Indiana, who were doing picket duty. The enemy succeeded in capturing, owing to the unavoidable unadjusted condition of t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 156 (search)
our lines around the enemy that during the night he evacuated his works. The next morning we moved out in pursuit and camped for the night at Resaca, unable to go farther in consequence of the bridge across the river at that point being destroyed. From thence we proceeded with the grand army in pursuit of Johnston's retreating forces, frequently skirmishing with him, and often forming lines of battle either to advance for the purpose of attacking him or receiving an attack from him, until May 24, at which time we were some ten miles beyond the Etowah River, when our brigade was detailed to guard the train, which we continued to do until June 11, when we again joined our corps and moved upon the enemy, who was in a strong fortified position some five miles from Kenesaw Mountain. He soon gave way, and we continued to drive him from one position to another until the 18th, when he again occupied strong works. Here my regiment fortified in a very exposed and dangerous position, but suc
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 172 (search)
miles. May 19, left camp at 9 a. m. A march of five miles brought us to Kingston. One mile south of Kingston an attack was anticipated. Lines were formed, skirmishers pushed forward, and rebels fell back and permitted us to bivouac three miles east of Kingston. May 23, marched at 11.40 a. m.; crossed the Etowah River below Gillem's Bridge, three miles south of which we went into bivouac. The day was very warm, the roads dusty, and the march of eleven miles fatigued the men very much. May 24, moved forward half a mile and took position on Dr. Jones' plantation. May 26, moved to Burnt Hickory; distance, twelve miles. May 28, moved toward Dallas three miles and bivouacked. May 29, marched northeast and camped two miles east of Burnt Hickory. June 1, marched southeast, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek and camping in rear of Twenty-third Corps; distance marched, seven miles. June 2, marched at 9.25 a. m. one and a half miles and relieved the Thirty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry in
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 181 (search)
sition 500 yards from, and partially enfilading, the enemy's main works; fired-rapidly until night-fall, when it withdrew and replenished with ammunition. On the 15th relieved Battery I, First Ohio Artillery, one-half mile to the right of our former position, and kept up a slow fire on the enemy's works during the day. Marched with the Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, May 16 and 17 until 4 p. m., when it engaged the enemy with the division at Rome, Ga., where it remained until the 24th of May, when it took up the line of march toward Dallas, Ga., arriving on the 27th, and was in position in different sections of the lines for the most part, yet firing but a few rounds, until the enemy evacuated, June 5, 1864. After resting until the 10th of June the battery moved with the division and took up a position. June 15, in line in front of the enemy's first line at Kenesaw Mountain, where it remained until the 19th, when the enemy fell back to the mountain. On the evening of the 2
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
ndicated. Crossed the Etowah at Gillem's Bridge. Head of column arrived at Euharlee Creek at 7 p. m., and, the rest of the command following, went into camp at about 11 p. m. two miles beyond. 11.30 p. m., received a note from Colonel Remick stating that all of the train that had been loaded had started for Kingston to join the command, and that the sugar had not yet arrived, and that as soon as it did the rest of the train would load and start. Roads good. Day hot. Road very dusty. May 24.-Orders of march to-day are: Start at 6 a. m.; cross the Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill; thence to Stilesborough, and follow the Twentieth Corps and encamp on the road to Dallas, connecting with the right of the Twentieth Corps. 6 a. m., commenced the march; Wood's division leading, then Newton's, then Stanley's. One of General Newton's regiments acting as train guard relieved, and Stanley ordered to substitute one for it. 8.15, arrived at Stilesborough, and halted for General Williams' di
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 9 (search)
vision crossed the river and joined Warren's corps. They advanced against the enemy with a view of dislodging him from his position at Ox Ford, but his lines were found so strong that after a brief encounter our forces withdrew. They had not been able to take with them any artillery. That night our whole army, except one division of Burnside's corps, was on the south side of the river and close up to the enemy's lines. General headquarters were established near Chesterfield Station on May 24. That day Sheridan returned from his memorable cavalry raid, and was warmly greeted by General Grant at headquarters, and heartily congratulated upon his signal success. He related some of the principal incidents in the raid very graphically, but with becoming modesty. In describing a particularly hot fight, he would become highly animated in manner and dramatic in gesture; then he would turn to some ludicrous incident, laugh heartily, and seem to enjoy greatly the recollection of it. It
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