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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 35 (search)
ced skirmishing, and so continued until the enemy was driven back to Cassville. This regiment lost during the day I enlisted man killed and 3 wounded. On Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, 20th, 21st, and 22d, the regiment lay in camp. On Monday, May 23, we marched west six miles, where we crossed the Etowah River, and continuing the march four miles farther encamped for the night. On Tuesday, May 24, the regiment moved out of camp at 6 a. m., and marched fifteen miles and encamped. On Wednesday, May 25, the regiment left camp at 10 a. m. and marched about eight miles to where the Twentieth Army Corps had been fighting, and encamped for the night. On Thursday, May 26, the regiment moved into the line of battle, our brigade being in reserve. On Friday, May 27, the regiment moved forward to the front line, and had sharp fighting all day. The casualties were 1 enlisted man killed and 3 wounded. On Saturday, May 28, our skirmishers were hotly engaged. The casualties in the regiment wer
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ing able to find a place in the line. I went into camp for the night just in the rear of the line. May 20, the enemy retreated during the night previous, and this day, the 21st, and 22d were devoted to refitting the troops. Monday, 23d, started at 1 p. m. and proceeded by way of Saltpetre Cave to Gillem's Bridge, where we crossed the Etowah, third in order of march. Advanced three miles beyond the river and encamped at 11 p. m. May 24, marched to Burnt Hickory, second in order of march. May 25, took the road toward New Hope Church, crossing the bridge over Pumpkin Vine Creek, in rear of Williams' division, Twentieth Corps, my division leading the Fourth Corps. Advanced to the neighborhood of New Hope Church, but did not participate in the conflict, though Kimball's (First) brigade was formed on the left of the road in readiness for such an event. About night-fall the whole division was formed in line on the left of the road. May 26, reformed my lines and intrenched within eight
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
e, bivouacking at 10 p. m. Constant skirmishing during the day. Brig. Gen. Nathan Kimball, in compliance with orders from General Thomas, relieved Colonel Sherman in command of the brigade May 22. The regiment remained at this point at rest until 12 noon of the 23d instant, when it marched in a southwesterly direction, crossing the Etowah River at 10 p. m., camping at midnight four miles beyond the river. May 24, marched at 6 a. m., moving slowly and with frequent halts, camping at 8 p. m. May 25, marched at 9 a. m., halting at 4 p. m.; lay in line of battle all this night (25-26). Continuous rain all night. This near New Hope Church. May 26, slightly changed position this morning, and at 10 a. m. established a line and built works under the fire of the enemy's sharpshooters. Constant skirmishing all day. This night lay on arms. Loss, 1 enlisted man wounded. May 27, this morning moved a short distance to the right and lay in works until 4 p. m., when the regiment moved out to adv
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 43 (search)
capture from the enemy and occupation of Atlanta: On the 3d day of May, 1864, the regiment marched from Cleveland, Tenn., its effective strength being 18 officers and 261 men. Subsequently it assisted in the occupation of Rocky Face Ridge after the capture of that place by the Third Brigade, Second Division, Fourth Army Corps. May 14 and 15, it was engaged with the enemy at Resaca. May 17, skirmished from Calhoun, Ga., to Pleasant Hill; engaged at Pleasant Hill from 4 p. m. to 6 p. m. May 25, took position at New Hope Church, on left of Twentieth Army Corps; engaged constantly in skirmishing for eleven days. June 6 and 7, covered removal of hospital, Third Division, Fourth Army Corps. 18th, supported skirmish line at Mud Creek. 19th, skirmished on Noonday Creek, in front of Kenesaw Mountain, taking 12 prisoners. 27th, formed part of column of attack on enemy's works. July 9, marched to Roswell and forded Chattahoochee River. 11th, recrossed river and returned to Rottenwood Cree
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 45 (search)
bout 4 o'clock, when I deployed the rest of my regiment as skirmishers on the extreme right of our brigade, connecting on my left with the Twenty-fourth Wisconsin and right with General Wood's division. In this position I remained all night. Was relieved the next morning (18th) at 6 o'clock by the Forty-second Illinois Volunteers. Continued our march again on same day. Passed Kingston on the 19th. Encamped near Kingston until May 22, when we again moved on. Met the enemy again on the 25th of May near Dallas. During the stay of our army before Dallas my regiment was almost daily more or less engaged with the enemy. Companies F, G, and I, especially, suffered severely on the 27th, a new skirmish line being established on that day, and said companies being out as skirmishers. On 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th of June we guarded, with the rest of our brigade, the hospital of our corps. Joined the army again on the 9th of June. Moved on the 11th. Were again engaged June 27 near Kenesaw
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
s every available team was ordered into the supply train, baggage was sent to the rear and the regiment was restricted to one team during the remainder of the campaign. May 23, marched at 12 m., leaving the enemy to our left, crossed the Etowah River shortly after dusk, and bivouacked two miles farther on at 8 p. m. May 24, moved at 8 a. m., crossed Euharlee Creek at Barrett's Mill, passed through Stilesborough, and bivouacked at dusk, after a march of thirteen miles under a scorching sun. May 25, moved to within one and a half miles of Dallas, and bivouacked in such position as to support the Twentieth Army Corps, which had engaged the enemy in strong force, and suffered a repulse during the afternoon. May 26, Companies B, F, G, H, and K were placed on picket, and the remainder of the regiment stood to arms during the day and threw up breastworks at night. May 27, the regiment remained behind works until 7 p. m., when it was ordered on picket. May 28, on picket; a continual firin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
railway gap in the Allatoona Hills. Taking twenty days subsistence in wagons, the entire army defiantly cut loose from its line of communication, crossed the Etowah River, and pushed boldly southward through a most abrupt and difficult range of hills. The movement was commenced on Monday, the 23d. On that and the following day my division led the Fourth Corps, but on the 25th it was in rear. Three days marches carried the army through the Allatoona range. Late in the afternoon of the 25th of May the enemy was encountered in force by the Twentieth Corps, when a sharp affair followed; it was not, however, participated in, owing to the lateness of the hour of its arrival in the vicinity of the action, by the troops of the Fourth Corps. The morning of the 26th still found the enemy in our front. My division was early deployed into order of battle on the left of the Second Division, of the Fourth Corps. The day was spent by my division in very brilliant and successful maneuveri
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
passing through Kingston; overtook the enemy near Cassville intrenched; took up position, and built breastworks. May 20, 21, 22, remained in our works, the enemy in the mean time retreating southward; while remaining in our works near Cassville replenished our stores of rations, reduced baggage, and prepared to follow the enemy across the Etowah River to his stronghold at Atlanta. May 23, took up line of march southward, crossed the Etowah River. May 24, still going southward in pursuit. May 25, still in pursuit. May 26, deployed regiment as skirmishers; encountered the enemy's skirmishers. Casualties, 1 man wounded, since dead (see schedule, marked A). May 27, were relieved as skirmishers and immediately ordered to move to the left to form part of a column of attack on the enemy's works. We moved about five miles to the left to a place known as Pickett's Mill; were formed in a column of attack — the Eightyninth forming part of the first or front line, the Fifteenth Wisconsin an
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
eventyninth Regiment Indiana Volunteers, was severely wounded; many enlisted men were killed and wounded. The brigade bivouacked in the position taken on the 19th day of May during the 20th, 21st, and 22d days of May, 1864. On the 22d day of May the Nineteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers rejoined the brigade, having been detached since the 4th day of May when near Catoosa SDrings. The brigade marched from the position near Cassville on the 23d day of May. Nothing occurred on the 24th and 25th of May. On the 26th the brigade was placed in support of the First and Second Brigades of this division, who had taken their position near Pumpkin Vine Creek. There was slight skirmishing and some shelling by the enemy during the day, but no casualties happened. On the 27th day of May at 10 a. m. the brigade was moved from its bivouac, formed in two lines of battle, preceded by a strong line of skirmishers, and ordered to move forward, with the center of the line resting on the Dallas and
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 87 (search)
by the enemy during the engagement. On the morning of May 16, the enemy having evacuated Resaca, I marched with the division, without being ordered into position, until the evening of the 17th, when I took position near Adairsville, but did no firing. I continued moving with the division the 18th and 19th, passing through Adairsville and Kingston, and went into camp on the 20th near Cassville, Ga., where I remained resting three days. I resumed the march with the division May 23, 24, and 25, moving toward Dallas, Ga. On the afternoon of May 2.6 I crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek and placed one section of my battery in position on the front line of General Wagner's brigade. This section was relieved on the afternoon of the 27th by a section of Battery M, First Illinois Artillery. At 11 p. m. of the same day my battery relieved Captain McDowell's (Pennsylvania) battery, which was posted with General Kimball's brigade within 150 yards of the enemy's works. I improved and strengthened t
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