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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 120 (search)
, A. D. C. and A. A. A. G., 3d Brig., 1st Div., 14th A. C. Hdqrs. Twenty-First Regt. Ohio Infty. Vols., Atlanta, Ga., September 9, 1864. Sir: In obedience to orders, I have the honor to report the operations of the Twenty-first Regiment Ohio Infantry Volunteers, under my command, in the Georgia campaign, to the morning of 2d of September, 1864: The regiment moved, under command of Col. James M. Neibling, from Ringgold, Ga., May 7, and he continued to command it until the morning of May 28, when he was severely wounded, and the command devolved upon myself. Not being present the first sixteen days of the campaign, I cannot mention definitely the operations for that time. The regiment, however, participated in the affair at Buzzard Roost, and, subsequently, in the affair at Resaca. The casualties in this regiment, to the time of my taking command, are 1 enlisted man killed and 14 enlisted men wounded in action. May 31, Lieut. John W. Berry, having his company (K) deployed a
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
and take the road to Dallas; entered Dallas at 4 p. m., the enemy's skirmishers retiring; bivouacked for the night about one mile north and east of Dallas. May 27, moved to the front one-half mile this morning and intrenched; our skirmishers have been engaged during the whole day, and sharp, heavy fighting has occurred this p. m. just to our right; casualties to-day are Thomas J. Coffey (private Company I) killed and Private G. W. Hogan (Company I) and Elon F. Currier (Company G) wounded. May 28, occupying the same line as yesterday; no casualties. May 29, things in our front remain nearly the same as yesterday; continual skirmishing, the rebels using some artillery; Private J. H. McLain (Company G) killed to-day. May 30, is but a repetition of yesterday, with the usual amount of skirmishing and shelling; no casualties reported. May 31, considerable fighting all along our front through the entire day; this p. m. the enemy shelled our position, killing Private Charles Wackwitz, C
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
night, marched on another road to Dallas, Ga., which we reached at 2 p. m., and, passing through, formed in line of battle one-half mile beyond and furnished pickets for our brigade front. The regiment lay on arms in line of battle; distance marched, eleven miles. May 27. at 6.30 a. m. changed our position and formed a new line of battle one-quarter of a mile to right and front of the last, and again at 9 a. m. moved one-quarter mile nearlyjto the right, and lay in line of battle all day. May 28, we have skirmishers out again in front and the skirmish fire is very brisk; regiment still remains in line of battle. May 29, in line of battle near Dallas, Ga., until just after dark, when we received orders to and moved out to the right and took position, supporting a battery, where we lay all night, while the rebels charged four times on our lines and were repulsed each time. Our men were very cool, many of them resting amid the fiercest fighting, unless ordered to fall in, when every
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
, no change. May 27, in forming line a gap of two and a half miles was discovered between General Hooker's right and the left of General McPherson. Under orders, I detailed the Thirty-fourth Illinois to find the line and complete the connection between these two wings of the army. The dangerous duty was performed with eminent satisfaction, though the colonel, with a small squad of his men, passed at one time through the enemy's picket-line. By midnight the entire line was perfect. May 28, 29, and 30, position unchanged. May 31, relieved by brigade of General Sweeny's division. June 1, relieved two brigades of Twenty-third Army Corps. June 2 and 3, occupied same position. June 4, relieved by General Whitaker's brigade. June 5, relieved brigade of General Williams' division. June 6, took up line two miles west of Big Shanty. June 7, 8, and 9, position unchanged. June 10, advanced line and faced due south. June 11, advanced line, and intrenched one and a half miles
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 172 (search)
ed. Lines were formed, skirmishers pushed forward, and rebels fell back and permitted us to bivouac three miles east of Kingston. May 23, marched at 11.40 a. m.; crossed the Etowah River below Gillem's Bridge, three miles south of which we went into bivouac. The day was very warm, the roads dusty, and the march of eleven miles fatigued the men very much. May 24, moved forward half a mile and took position on Dr. Jones' plantation. May 26, moved to Burnt Hickory; distance, twelve miles. May 28, moved toward Dallas three miles and bivouacked. May 29, marched northeast and camped two miles east of Burnt Hickory. June 1, marched southeast, crossing Pumpkin Vine Creek and camping in rear of Twenty-third Corps; distance marched, seven miles. June 2, marched at 9.25 a. m. one and a half miles and relieved the Thirty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry inder heavy skirmish fire; put two companies on skirmish line, which at that time was the extreme left of the Fourteenth Corps; had 2 men
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
ut demonstrating on their works we could not have told whether they were held in very strong force. The position we secured to-day will enable General Sherman to pass troops around our left for the purpose of turning the enemy's right flank. May 28.-Day opened with skirmishing and artillery firing by both armies. No orders for attack given. The general and staff visited Wood's lines at 6.30 a. m., and Wood was then instructed to reform his lines, his right too much refused, and to send ourted that he made a connection with General Schofield at 3 p. m. Skirmishing all along our front to-day. Day bright and warm. Lost but a few men killed and wounded to-day. May 29.-2 a. m., received orders from department headquarters, dated May 28 (copy of orders from Military Division of the Mississippi of same date), stating that there would be a general move of the army to the left, and that General Thomas would connect with General McPherson, whose left would rest on the creek above th
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 10 (search)
took place on the morning of the 27th. It was followed by Russell's division of infantry. The rest of the troops had made a good march, and soon after midday on May 28, Wright, Hancock, and Warren had crossed the river and gone into position about a mile and a half beyond. Burnside had reached the ferry, but remained on the norhat the name Cold Harbor was correct, that it had been taken from the places frequently found along the highways of England, and means shelter without fire. On May 28 Sheridan was pushed out toward Mechanicsville to discover the enemy's position, and after a sharp fight at Haw's Shop, drove a body of the enemy out of some earthh side until the morning of the 30th to cover the crossing of the trains. General headquarters had crossed the Pamunkey on the pontoon-bridge in the afternoon of May 28, after a hard, dusty ride, and had gone into camp on the south side. In the mean time Lee had moved his entire army rapidly from the North Anna, and thrown it be
As before related, Wilson's division struck the enemy's infantry as well as W. H. F. Lee's cavalry near Ashland on the 1st of June, and although Chapman destroyed the bridges over the South Anna, which was his part of the programme, Wilson found it necessary to return to Price's Store. From this point he continued to cover the right of the General James H. Wilson. Army of the Potomac, on the 2d of June driving the rear-guard of the enemy from Hawe's Shop, the scene of the battle of May 28. The same day he crossed Tolopotomy Creek, and passed around the enemy's left flank so far that Lee thought his left was turned by a strong force, and under cover of darkness withdrew from a menacing position which he was holding in front of the Ninth Corps. This successful manoeuvre completed, Wilson returned to Hawe's Shop, and on the 4th went into camp at New Castle ferry, in anticipation of certain operations of the Cavalry Corps, which were to take place while the Army of the Potomac
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 26: the gun-boats in the James River-battle of seven Pines. (search)
effectives. On May Igth, my husband again wrote to me as follows: . I have but a moment to say that I am well as usual, and busier than heretofore. General Johnston has brought his army back to the suburbs of Richmond, and I have been waiting all day for him to communicate his plans. The enemy have pushed out their pickets, and have found out his movements while concealing their own. We are uncertain of everything, except that a battle must be near at hand. Under date of May 28th Mr. Davis wrote me as follows: We are steadily developing for a great battle, and under God's favor I trust for a decisive victory. The enemy are preparing to concentrate in advance by regular approaches; we must attack him in motion, and trust to the valor of our troops for success. It saddens me to feel how many a mother, wife, and child will be made to grieve in bitterness, but what is there worse than submission to such brutal tyranny as now holds sway over New Orleans. Co
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 42: President Davis's letter to General Johnston after the fall of Vicksburg. (search)
retary of War of June 5th, followed by that of June 8th, conveyed unmistakably the very reverse of the meaning you attribute to them, and your reference to them as supporting your position is unintelligible. I revert therefore to my telegram of May 28th. That telegram was in answer to one from you in which you stated that, on the arrival of certain reinforcements, then on the way, you would have about 23,000; that Penberton could be saved only by beating Grant; and you added, unless you can pent: I much regret the carelessness of my reply of the 16th, to your telegram of the 15th. In my despatch of 12th to the Secretary of War, I referred to the words, we withheld nothing which it was practicable to give. In your telegram of May 28th, and the telegram of the Secretary of War to me of June 5th, except the last sentence, I considered Executive as including the Secretary of War. Candy Creek Camp, July 5th, via Jackson, July 7, 1863. To the President: Your despatch of June
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