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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
rage displayed on this field. Our casualty list in this day's fighting attests its severity, being as follows: Commissioned officers-killed, 3; wounded,3. Enlisted men-killed, 49; wounded, 144; missing, 4. Aggregate loss, 203. During the night of the 27th we went into position with the brigade and fortified; remained in the position during the days of the 28th and 29th, and on the evening of the 30th advanced our line nearer the enemy and fortified. Remained in this position until June 4, alternating with the Eighty-ninth Illinois Volunteers on the first line, meeting with no loss. On the morning of the 5th it was discovered that the enemy had evacuated their position in our front. On the 6th marched with the column to camp near Acworth, a distance of eight miles, where we remained to recuperate our wasted energies until the 10th, when the army resumed offensive operations, and on the 12th went into position in front of Pine Top Mountain. The work [sic] nothing was done u
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 73 (search)
ght of the 30th of May orders were received to move to the right and front, which, owing to the intense darkness, was accomplished with much difficulty. On the morning of the 31st of May orders were given to intrench the position. While engaged in this the enemy attempted to charge the line. He was met by Major Claggett, of the Seventeenth Kentucky Volunteers, commanding the skirmish line, and successfully repulsed. The brigade remained in the above position till the morning of the 4th of June, when orders were received to move to the right, to relieve McCook's brigade, of Davis' division, Fourteenth Army Corps. The enemy having abandoned his position on the 5th, on the 6th day of June the brigade marched in the direction of Acworth, and remained in bivouac until the 10th of June. The time of the non-veterans of the Thirteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteers having nearly expired, they were sent to the rear to be mustered out. The veterans and those who had to serve an unexpired ter
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 75 (search)
actively engaged. My regiment being on the extreme right of the brigade, I was ordered to halt with a view of protecting that flank. The enemy with a heavy force compelled the brigade to retire, though not until night-fall, when it fel back in good order. In this action the regiment sustained a serious loss in wounded, though none proved mortal. After retiring from the field where the command fought on the 27th of May my regiment was placed on the second line, where it remained until June 4, when the brigade was ordered to relieve McCook's brigade, of Johnson's division. My regiment was then assigned to the front line behind works, and not more than 400 yards distant from that of the enemy. On the morning of June 5 it was ascertained that the enemy had again abandoned his line of works and fallen back in the direction of Marietta, Ga. On June 6 the command again marched. Arriving near Acworth Station, Ga., went into camp and remained until June 10, when an advance was made u
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 76 (search)
position on the right of the First Brigade, and the exhausted men lay down and slept. The loss of my regiment in this action was 4 killed and about 16 wounded; none captured. On the morning of the 28th we threw up works, and later in the day, moving to the right, threw up another line, which we occupied until the night of the 30th, when we moved to the right and front, the brigade making connection with the Twenty-third Corps. On the 31st threw up works, which we occupied until the 4th of June, --when we moved to the right a short distance, relieving a part of the Fourteenth Corps. During the night of the 4th the enemy evacuated their works in our front, and on the morning of the 6th we moved out on the Acworth road, and went into camp, where we lay until the 10th. Nothing of interest occurred until the 14th, when we were engaged in the movement that caused the enemy to evacuate Pine Top and the works connected therewith., On the 15th moved on to Pine Top, where we lay until
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 78 (search)
Here my loss again was very heavy. Capt. Thomas R. Brown was wounded severely, 1 private killed and 42 wounded. This was a very unsatisfactory fight to me. The only grain of comfort I could glean from it: an additional evidence to many others was afforded by it of the invincible pluck of the Seventeenth Kentucky. After this engagement we moved to the right, changed positions, and made fortifications several times, all the time under fire and in constant rain, until on the night of the 4th of June the enemy evacuated their works and we followed them. Before this event, however, namely, on the 31st of May, five companies of this regiment were in front of our works doing duty as outposts, in charge of Maj. D. M. Claggett, when the enemy in their front made a charge upon them, which they repulsed handsomely without assistance or re-enforcements. But here 1 enlisted man was killed and 5 wounded. On the 6th of June we moved to the vicinity of Acworth and remained there until the 1
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 81 (search)
line), the regiment lost I killed, 29 wounded, and 16 missing, including the commanding officer, Lieut. Col. G. A. Frambes, and Adjt. M. J. W. Holter. Night having terminated the fighting of this bloody afternoon, we retired to the right and rear of the scene of action, and rested until morning, when we were moved still farther to the right, confronting and skirmishing with the enemy. On the 31st we were again moved to the right, where we threw up intrenchments and remained until the 4th day of June, when we were ordered again to the right, relieving and occupying the works of the Second Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. The next morning the enemy left our front. On the 6th we were ordered to march in pursuit, and in the evening went into camp, where we remained until the 10th, when, after moving about two miles, we again rested until the 14th. On the 15th the enemy again abandoned their position in our front, and again we started in pursuit. We were thus constantly pushing the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 82 (search)
laced in position and engaged in driving the enemy to Kenesaw Mountain. June 20, by command of Brigadier-General Brannan, chief of artillery, Department of the Cumberland, at 2 p. m. the artillery of the corps concentrated their fire upon the right of Kenesaw Mountain, silencing the enemy's batteries at that point. The batteries of the Second Division were relieved at dusk by the Fourteenth Army Corps, and marched with their division two miles to the right of their former position. June 21, four guns of Bridges' Battery, Illinois Light Artillery, and four guns of Sixth Ohio Light Battery, and Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery, were placed in position in General Wood's front line, and Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery, in General Newton's left front, all bearing upon two rebel batteries in General Wood's left and General Stanley's right front, which were doing much damage to each of the last-named divisions. By Major-General Howard's order these batteries opened upon the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 87 (search)
I fired spherical case and canister whenever the enemy made any demonstration in my front while I remained in these works. On the 31st of May I had 1 man wounded severely. The evening of June 1 one section was sent to General Wagner's brigade. June 4, I had I man wounded severely. On the night of June 4 my battery was relieved by a battery of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and I withdrew to the rear, by direction of Captain Aleshire, chief of artillery. I had been nine successive days on the June 4 my battery was relieved by a battery of the Fifteenth Army Corps, and I withdrew to the rear, by direction of Captain Aleshire, chief of artillery. I had been nine successive days on the line. The fuses of the spherical case and shell that I used were nearly worthless, and not one in twenty would explode. I moved with the division June 6 and 7, and went into camp near Morris' Hill Church, where I remained during June 7, 8, and 9. I marched with the division on the 10th toward Lost Mountain, but remained in reserve until the 15th, when I was ordered into position about one mile from Pine Mountain, with General Wagner's brigade as support. I fired twenty-four rounds of solid s
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 97 (search)
rail pens and across the field. The regiment lost 2 men wounded, 1 mortally. The regiment was relieved at 6 o'clock in the evening by troops of General Baird's division and moved back in reserve to Brown's Mill creek. On the 3d June, at 9 o'clock, the regiment was ordered, with Eighty-eighth Indiana, to report to General Baird on the front line, where they remained until the morning of the 4th, when they reported back to the brigade. The rebels evacuated their works on the night of the 4th June. On the morning of the 6th they marched, at 6 o'clock, east to within about four miles of Acworth and encamped near Morris' Hill Church. Here they threw up works and remained until the morning of the 10th June. Marched on the morning of the 10th June, at 7 o'clock, on the Marietta and Burnt Hickory road to near Big Shanty, remaining in that vicinity until the 16th June, the brigade being in reserve. On the evening of the 16th June they relieved the Second Brigade, the One hundred and fo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 109 (search)
e enemy, and during the ten days operations at that point, in addition to much suffering from wet and exposure, lost many men in killed and wounded. On the night of the 29th May two companies, A (First) and C (Second), gallantly charged and took a hill in our front, which was then fortified by the Second, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, Captain Fetterman. The rebels charged this position the 31st, and we aided the Second, Eighteenth, in repulsing them. The rebels having evacuated New Hope the 4th June, we lay in camp till the 9th, when we moved against them in their position at Lost Mountain, and on its evacuation took part in the operations against Kenesaw Mountain. On the evacuation of this point, July 3, we followed them closely, four companies supporting a section of artillery on the skirmish line. On the 4th of July we endured for several hours a severe cannonade, losing a number of men killed and wounded. On the 6th we reached the banks of the Chattahoochee and lay in camp till
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