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Mexico, and the Indian Territory south of Kansas, who shall not be chargeable with actual hostility or other crime against the public safety, and who shall acknowledge the authority of the Government of the Confederate States. And I do further proclaim and make known that I have established the rules and regulations hereto annexed, in accordance with the provisions of said law. Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States of America at the city of Richmond, on this 14th day of August, A. D. 1861. By the President, [seal], Jefferson Davis. R. M. T. Hunter, Secretary of State. Regulations respecting alien enemies. The following regulations are hereby established respecting alien enemies, under the provisions of an act approved 8th August, 1861, entitled An act respecting alien enemies: See Document 172 1/2, p. 492. 1. Immediately after the expiration of the term of forty days from the date of the foregoing proclamation, it shall be the duty of
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 183.-Major McKinstry's proclamation. (search)
ny violation of order will be followed by prompt and adequate punishment, regardless of persons or positions. J. Mckinstry, Major U. S. Army, Provost-Marshal. Office of the Provost-Marshal, St. Louis, Mo., August 14, 1861. Order no. 20. Office Provost-Marshal, Aug. 14, 1861. The wearing of concealed weapons by any persons not in the military service of the United States, or in the regularly constituted police force of the city, is hereby prohibited. No excuse of any kind or description will mitigate the severe punishment ordered to be inflicted for a violation of this order. J. McKinstry, Major U. S. Army, Provost-Marshal. Order no. 21. Office Provost-Marshal, St. Louis, August 14. Notice is hereby given to gunsmiths and dealers in firearms, resident in the city and county of St. Louis, that no description of firearms will be permitted to be sold or given away after this date, without a special permit from this office. J. Mokinstry, Major U. S. A., Provost-Marshal.
on trial for their lives as pirates. They are in harsh confinement, and have been, if they are not still, in irons. Others are in prison and in irons in Philadelphia. Their fate depends on the finding of a court, and the subsequent caprice of a President. It is alleged that the device will be employed of considering them as pirates, and then saving their lives by a commutation of sentence. The indignity to these States will be insisted on, but the responsibility will be evaded. There is no better way of treating this than to hold an imprisonment and a trial of any Confederate sailor as a wrong to be retaliated upon enemies within our power, so as to compel the abandonment of a brutal and insulting practice. We have unlimited faith that nothing will be so done, or omitted to be done, by the men at the head of the Confederate Government, which will compromise, directly or indirectly, the rights of soldiers or sailors who meet danger in its service. --N. O. Picayune, Aug. 14.
t time, and his influence over the French population of Louisiana became very great. As a reward for his political services he obtained his son's admission to the military academy of West Point, where the young cadet was entered under the name of Pierre G. Toutan. In the mean time, he bought, in the vicinity of New Orleans, an estate to which he gave the name of Beauregard, (fine sight.) When the son got his commission of officer in the army, he half dropped his modest name of Toutan, to adopt the more aristocratic one of Beauregard, and henceforth signed Pierre Toutan de Beauregard. Thus, we may see one day, two generals of alleged French Canadian extraction-Jean Charles Fremont and Pierre Toutan de Beauregard-at the head of powerful armies, one from the Northern States and the other from this Confederacy, contending with each other on the banks of the Potomac, or the Ohio, or the Mississippi, for the independence or the subjugation of this country.--N. O. Picayune, August 14.
ere secured, and by evening she was lying at anchor near the Powhatan. Among the papers were letters from the commander of the Sumter and her officers, giving some idea of her future movements, and indicating that her cruising ground was to be down on the Spanish Main. In two or three hours the schooner had a prize crew on board, and the Powhatan was off for Pensacola to notify the flag-officer of the Sumter's whereabouts, the Niagara remaining to blockade the South-west Pass. On the 14th August, at sunset, we arrived at Pensacola. The captain communicated with Flag-officer Mervine, and in half an hour we were steering south after the Sumter. Rather a lame duck the old Powhatan, in her present condition, to send after a clipper-steamer; but it will be seen that lame ducks on occasions get along as well as some that are not lame. There was, I assure you, a high state of excitement on board the Powhatan at the idea of going after the Sumter, and a great deal of satisfaction expr
ed, wounded and prisoners, amounted to about one thousand eight hundred men, besides which fully one thousand men straggled back to Culpeper Court-House and beyond, and never entirely returned to their commands. A strong cavalry force, under Generals Buford and Bayard, pursued the enemy to the Rapidan, and captured many stragglers. The cavalry forces immediately resumed their original position, and again occupied the Rapidan from Raccoon Ford to the base of the Blue Ridge. On the fourteenth of August, General Reno, with eight thousand men of the forces which had arrived at Falmouth under General Burnside, joined me. I immediately pushed forward my whole force in the direction of the Rapidan, and occupied a strong position, with my right, under Major-Gen. Sigel, resting on Robertson's River, where the road from Cedar Mountain to Orange Court-House crosses that stream; my centre, under Gen. McDowell, occupied both flanks of Cedar Mountain; and my left, under General Reno, a position
ed, wounded and prisoners, amounted to about one thousand eight hundred men, besides which fully one thousand men straggled back to Culpeper Court-House and beyond, and never entirely returned to their commands. A strong cavalry force, under Generals Buford and Bayard, pursued the enemy to the Rapidan, and captured many stragglers. The cavalry forces immediately resumed their original position, and again occupied the Rapidan from Raccoon Ford to the base of the Blue Ridge. On the fourteenth of August, General Reno, with eight thousand men of the forces which had arrived at Falmouth under General Burnside, joined me. I immediately pushed forward my whole force in the direction of the Rapidan, and occupied a strong position, with my right, under Major-Gen. Sigel, resting on Robertson's River, where the road from Cedar Mountain to Orange Court-House crosses that stream; my centre, under Gen. McDowell, occupied both flanks of Cedar Mountain; and my left, under General Reno, a position
Doc. 2.-General McClellan's report of the operations after the evacuation of Harrison's Landing. headquarters army of the Potomac, October 15, 1862. General: I have the honor to submit a preliminary report of the military operations under my charge since the evacuation of Harrison's Landing. The measure directed by the General-in-Chief was executed successfully with entire safety to my command and its material, between the fourteenth and nineteenth of August. The line of withdrawal selected was that of the mouth of the Chickahominy, Williamsburgh, and Yorktown. Upon this line the main body of the army with all its trains was moved, Heintzelman's corps crossing the Chickahominy at Jones's Bridge, and covering by its march the movement of the main column. The passage of the Lower Chickahominy was effected by means of a batteau bridge two thousand feet in length. The transfer of the army to Yorktown was completed by the nineteenth of August. The embarkation of the troop
ent of troops, and conduct of individual officers and men, I would respectfully call your attention to the accompanying official reports of other officers. Two maps, by Mr. J. Hotchkiss,--one of the route of the army during the expedition, and the other of the battle-field,--are transmitted herewith. In order to render thanks to God for the victory at Cedar Run, and other past victories, and to implore His continued favor in the future, divine service was held in the army on the fourteenth of August. I am, General, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. List showing the Killed and Wounded in the Army commanded by Major-General Jackson in the Battle of Cedar Run. divisions.officers.enlisted men.enlisted men. Killed.Wounded.Killed.Wounded.Missing. Jackson's126514547231 Ewell's31714161  A. H. Hill's43245313  Total1911420494631 Total killed, wounded, and missing, 1314. Report of General Ewell. Richmond, Virginia, Ma
is untiring zeal and dauntless courage, cheering his men, under heavy fire, during the entire engagement. My command succeeded in driving the enemy from their batteries with great slaughter, and turning his own batteries against his retreating forces. A large number of small arms and accoutrements and three stand of colors were captured. For the action of the Texas and Third Georgia brigades, I respectfully refer to the reports of General Hood and the Colonels commanding. On the fourteenth of August, my division was ordered to support the command of Brigadier-General Rodes, on the left of the road, near South Mountain. On marching my brigade up the mountain, on our extreme left, I was informed that the two brigades, under the immediate command of Brigadier-General Hood, had been detached, by order of the Major-General commanding, to support our right, and I was further ordered to hold my position on the left, and that reinforcements would be sent. On my arrival at the summit of
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