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ght (28) wagons with corn, when the expedition returned to camp. Again, October twenty-sixth, it formed a part of a foraging expedition sent out under charge of Brigne four days, and loaded thirty-two wagons with forage. Again, on the twenty-sixth of October, the regiment went with the brigade on a foraging expedition to Berkshonsiderable skirmishing took place with the rebel cavalry near East-Point. October 26.--At seven A. M., I left Atlanta, in command of a foraging expedition composeply of fresh meats, sweet potatoes, etc. From the nineteenth to the twenty-sixth of October, the regiment remained in camp, furnishing the usual details for picket and other purposes. On the morning of the twenty-sixth of October, the regiment with brigade reported to General Geary, and under his command was engaged in a seight hundred wagons with corn and forage. A similar expedition started October twenty-sixth, not going so far, however, but meeting with the same success, and witho
, near rolling-mills, from which place it moved on the fifteenth September into park on north side of city. On the sixteenth October marched with troops of the Second division, General Geary commanding, on forage expedition; also on the twenty-sixth October, with troops of First division, Colonel Robinson commanding; capturing, for use of command, in both expeditions, sixty bushels corn, and a quantity of corn-fodder. The battery remained in park until November fifteenth, expending no ammuober sixteenth, going as far as Flat Rock Shoals, on South River. In the expedition were probably six hundred wagons, which were all filled with corn and fodder. One section of battery accompanied another expedition, under General Geary, October twenty-sixth, proceeding in direction of Lithonia, on Georgia Railroad. From these and other expeditions from Atlanta, we received in all about seven thousand (7000) pounds corn for the animals of the battery. We moved from Atlanta November fifteenth
works. September twelfth, moved camp to the north side of the city. September seventeenth, division reviewed by General Williams. September nineteenth, division reviewed by General Slocum. October twentieth, Colonel James L. Selfridge took command of the First brigade. October twenty-first, moved out the Decatur road on a foraging expedition under command of Colonel. October twenty-third, Colonel Carman came out with Second brigade to support us, and took command; arrived in camp October twenty-sixth at four P. M. Brought in some eight hundred wagons loaded with corn. October twenty-eighth, 1864, moved out to Decatur to support a forage party, returned the same night. November fifth, moved out the McDonough road three miles, camped for the night. Some little picket-firing took place during the night. Returned to our old camp on the sixth. November eleventh, an election was held in the regiment; two hundred and forty-three votes were polled for A. Lincoln, and one hundred and t
there to await the arrival of the infantry. The enemy fell back to London that night. I reached the front on the morning of the twenty-second, moved the infantry to Mouse Creek that day, and soon afterwards to Sweet-water. On the evening of the twenty-third of October the enemy advanced in considerable force and engaged the cavalry for a short time, retiring at dusk. Their loss is not known. Ours is five wounded. The same movement was again made by them on the evening of the twenty-sixth of October. In this affair our loss was three wounded and five missing. The enemy are known to have had three commissioned officers and several privates killed, and a number wounded. On the twenty-seventh of October I was informed that the notorious bushwhacker and robber, Bryson, had been sent, with his command, by Burnside, to get in my rear and obtain information as to our movements and intentions. I immediately gave Brigadier-General Vaughn a detachment of about one hundred men, and d
ry rules and precautions. Instead of meeting the enemy with double their force and a good ferry behind him, he was outnumbered three to one and had no means of retreat. Cogswell is a prisoner; he behaved very handsomely. Raymond Lee is also taken. I found things in great confusion when I arrived there. In a very short time order and confidence were restored. During the night I withdrew everything and everybody to this side of the river, which, in truth, they should never have left. Oct. 26, 1.15 A. M. For the last three hours I have been at Montgomery Blair's, talking with Senators Wade, Trumbull, and Chandler about war matters. They will make a desperate effort to-morrow to have Gen. Scott retired at once; until that is accomplished I can effect but little good. He is ever in my way, and I am sure does not desire effective action. I want to get through with the war as rapidly as possible. . . . I go out soon after breakfast to review Porter's division, about five mile
my another battle imminent removed from the command Burnside brings the order Farewells to the army. On the 25th of Oct. the pontoon-bridge at Berlin was constructed, there being already one across the Potomac and another across the Shenandoah at Harper's Ferry. On the 26th two divisions of the 9th corps and Pleasonton's brigade of cavalry crossed at Berlin and occupied Lovettsville. The 1st, 6th, and 9th corps, the cavalry, and reserve artillery crossed at Berlin between the 26th of Oct. and the 2d of Nov. The 2d and 5th corps crossed at Harper's Ferry between the 29th of Oct. and 1st of Nov. Heavy rains delayed the movement considerably in the beginning, and the 1st, 5th, and 6th corps were obliged to halt at least one day at the crossings to complete, as far as possible, the necessary supplies that could not be procured at an earlier period. The plan of campaign I adopted during the advance was to move the army well in hand parallel to the Blue Ridge, taking Wa
o march the moment the cavalry is ready, which will be shortly. I don't think Lee will fight us nearer than Richmond. I expect no fight in this vicinity. . . . My report is at last finished, and will, I presume, be copied to-day. . . . I see that there is much impatience throughout the country for a move. I am just as anxious as any one, but am crippled by want of horses. . . . I sent Bishop McIlvaine over to Harper's Ferry in my ambulance. He is accompanied by the Rev. Mr. Clements. Oct. 26. . . . I move a respectable number of troops across the Potomac to-day, the beginning of the general movement, which will, however, require several days to accomplish, for the cavalry is still terribly off. Yesterday a telegram received from the President asking what my cavalry had done since the battle of Antietam to fatigue anything. It was one of those little flings that I can't get used to when they are not merited. Pleasant Valley, Oct.-- Since about three this morning it ha
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.8 (search)
muslin, and tore and spat in a frenzy; but this was the means of saving me from the necessity of chasing the wretched animal along the corridors, for, as it was rushing through the door, I caught the veil. The next day, a long procession wound through the streets towards the cemetery. From Note-Book:-- In the morning, hired hack, visited Saint Roch's, or Campo Santo, St. Louis--1, 2, 3, & 4, Cemeteries — drove to Girod's Cemetery — examined book, and found that James Speake died October 26th, and was buried October 27th, 1859, aged 47. The place of interment was surrounded by a high wall, which contained several square tablets, commemorative, as I supposed, of the dead lying in the earth; but I was much shocked when I learned that, behind each tablet, was a long narrow cell wherein bodies were corrupting. One of these cells had just been opened, and was destined for the body of my late employer; but, unfortunately for my feelings, not far off lay, huddled in a corner, the
While Hood was turning back from Atlanta in the great northward movement, which, in the hopes of the Confederacy, would bring the Army of Tennessee to the banks of the Ohio, there was gathering at and around Nashville a force to dispute the progress of Hood. General Thomas was sent by Sherman to take care of Tennessee, and he was preparing to weld many fragmentary bodies of troops into a fighting army. After a month of bold maneuvering, the advance of Hood's army appeared, on the 26th of October, at Decatur, on the south side of the Tennessee. It had been a time of perplexity to the Federal authorities and of intense alarm throughout the North. Hood had twice thrown his army between Sherman and the latter's base; had captured four garrisons, and destroyed thirty miles of railroad. His movements had been bold and brilliantly executed. At Decatur, Hood found himself too far east to join with Forrest, whose cooperation was absolutely necessary to him. So he moved westward to
While Hood was turning back from Atlanta in the great northward movement, which, in the hopes of the Confederacy, would bring the Army of Tennessee to the banks of the Ohio, there was gathering at and around Nashville a force to dispute the progress of Hood. General Thomas was sent by Sherman to take care of Tennessee, and he was preparing to weld many fragmentary bodies of troops into a fighting army. After a month of bold maneuvering, the advance of Hood's army appeared, on the 26th of October, at Decatur, on the south side of the Tennessee. It had been a time of perplexity to the Federal authorities and of intense alarm throughout the North. Hood had twice thrown his army between Sherman and the latter's base; had captured four garrisons, and destroyed thirty miles of railroad. His movements had been bold and brilliantly executed. At Decatur, Hood found himself too far east to join with Forrest, whose cooperation was absolutely necessary to him. So he moved westward to
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