Your search returned 620 results in 287 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
lready captured a couple of steamboats trying to pass down the Savannah River from Augusta, and had established some of his men on Argyle and Hutchinson Islands above the city, and wanted to transfer a whole corps to the South Carolina bank; but, as the enemy had iron-clad gunboats in the river, I did not deem it prudent, because the same result could be better accomplished from General Foster's position at Broad River. Fort McAllister was captured as described, late in the evening of December 13th, and by the 16th many steamboats had passed up as high as King's Bridge; among them one which General Grant had dispatched with the mails for the army, which had accumulated since our departure from Atlanta, under charge of Colonel A. H. Markland. These mails were most welcome to all the officers and soldiers of the army, which had been cut off from friends and the world for two months, and this prompt receipt of letters from home had an excellent effect, making us feel that home was ne
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-occupation of Monterey, Va. April 8, 1862. (search)
nd a stiff breeze kept up till morning. Your correspondent was out on picket with twenty good men, and got no rest; but we remembered that we were out a soldiering. Sunday morning opened up clear and beautiful, and we resumed our march at eight o'clock. About two P. M. we reached the deserted rebel fortifications on Allegheny Mountains, and had no difficulty in finding quarters, for all the cabins erected for five or six regiments still remain standing. Since we fought them on the thirteenth of December last, they had made vast improvements, so much so that I could scarcely recognise the place. It was made strong on all sides, and nothing but extreme necessity could have induced them to abandon it. We had just got settled down in our new quarters, supposing we might remain there a little while, when, after dark, we were ordered to advance to Monterey on Monday morning at eight o'clock. Morning dawned bleak and cold, and as we formed in line to march, the snow began to fall. It
Bean's Station. Here our regiment was sent out on the Morristown road to the Holston River. Here we ran upon the rebels; had considerable skirmishing; lost one man. After dark we returned to the station. December tenth, remained at the station. December eleventh, Colonel Pennebaker, with our brigade, went to Morristown. Made no attack on the enemy, as he was about a mile east of town. We returned to Bean's Station after night. December twelfth, remained at the station. December thirteenth, in the evening the enemy moved upon our pickets. Had some skirmishing. We formed line of battle, with artillery in position, to receive him, but, after some skirmishing, the rebels drew off. December fourteenth, in the evening, the enemy moved down the valley, in solid columns, upon us. Our corps was put into position; our division — Wolford's — in front, contesting every inch of ground. Our regiment was ordered to take position in the houses. The station-house is a very large
ition assigned it in the brigade. After crossing the river, December thirteenth, the regiment marched nearly one mile down the river and wasgiment and ordered to occupy the position first assigned me, December thirteenth, in rear of the battery — in this position we remained untilassisted me upon the march and during the engagement of Saturday, December thirteenth; also Adjutant Geo. W. Remington and all officers and momen; private Sylvester Godfrey, Co. H, shoulder, slightly ; December thirteenth, private George Root, Co. A, shoulder, slightly. Total wouned, Esq.: sir: The report of the Battle of Fredericksburgh, December thirteenth, was brought to us by telegraph the night of the battle. Thshington by steamboat. The principal battle occurred on the thirteenth December, and on the twenty-fifth the last of the wounded were removeies of the Seventh infantry volunteers, on the eleventh and thirteenth of December, at the battle of Fredericksburgh: killed--Lieut. Frank
ties, and in the field lashed against the enemy by the invective and appeals of able spokesmen, so distrustful of their generals and each other, so pampered, and yet so dissatisfied. The aurora borealis, which overspread the heavens, and darted blood-red tongues of flame swiftly from the meridian down to the horizon, was accepted by the confederates as the cross outlined on the sky was accepted by Constantine — an earnest of assured victory. December 13, 1862. The morning of the thirteenth of December--a memorable day to the historian of the Decline and Fall of the American Republic — broke still and warm, while, as on the preceding day, a thick haze enveloped the town of Fredericksburgh and the circumjacent valley, and delayed the opening of fire by the antagonistic batteries until the sun had been up some three or four hours. It was strange to contrast Saturday, the thirteenth of September, with Saturday, the sixth, and to compare the intense cold of the earlier Saturday with th
he most substantial manner by the Fifty-eighth Indiana, Colonel Buel, under the direction of Captain Reese, of the Engineer corps, and on the morning of the thirteenth December, the Second division of the Fifteenth corps, under command of Brigadier-General Hazen, crossed the bridge to the west bank of the Ogeechee, and marched down Seventeenth army corps, detachments covering the rear of several army corps, till the army reached the rebel lines and commenced the investment of Savannah. December 13. My command crossed the Ogeechee and Canoucher rivers, and marched to attack and capture Fort McAllister. Striking distance had already been reached, a recoit for the troops. Operations before Savannah. December 12. Third regiment Wisconsin volunteers crossed to Argyle Island. Steamer Resolute captured. December 13. The remainder of the Third brigade, First division, moved to Cherokee Hill to protect the rear, and formed connection on its left with portion of Fourteenth
December 13. My command crossed the Ogeechee and Canoucher rivers, and marched to attack and capture Fort McAllister. Striking distance had already been reached, a reconnoissance made, and all requisite information gained, when, in accordance with the expressed wish of the General-in-Chief, I abandoned my designs of attack, and, with my command, moved to reconnoitre St. Catharine's Sound, and open up communication with our fleet. This was accomplished before ten o'clock the same day on which Fort McAllister fell.
Operations before Savannah. December 12. Third regiment Wisconsin volunteers crossed to Argyle Island. Steamer Resolute captured. December 13. The remainder of the Third brigade, First division, moved to Cherokee Hill to protect the rear, and formed connection on its left with portion of Fourteenth corps. December 14. Two regiments of Second division pushed over on to Hutchinson's Island. December 15. Second regiment Massachusetts volunteers reenforced Third regiment Wisconsin volunteers on Argyle Island. December 16. Second brigade, Third division, relieved remainder of Second brigade, First division, the latter crossing over to Argyle Island. December 19. The regiments of the Second brigade, First division, crossed over to the South-Carolina shore and intrenched themselves between Clydesdale Creek and the house of Mr. Izzard. December 21. Savannah having been evacuated by the enemy, the Second division took possession of the city early in
cember fifth, reached Jacksonboro. December sixth, arrived at Beaver Dam Creek and joined the other two divisions of the corps. December seventh, late at night, reached Sisters Ferry. December eighth, remained in camp during the day and had considerable skirmishing with the advance of the enemy's cavalry; marched at midnight and crossed Ebenezer Creek at three A. M., December ninth. December tenth, encamped within twelve miles of Savannah, making short marches. Division encamped, December thirteenth, on the Louisville road six miles from the city, where it remained until the twenty-second, at which time, the city having been evacuated on the night of the twentieth, it was moved to a position, still occupied, half a mile from the town. December twenty-seventh, corps reviewed by Major-General Sherman. The division entered upon the campaign organized as it had hitherto been, into three brigades of infantry, commanded respectively by Colonel George P. Este, Fourteenth Ohio volu
nd took position near the enemy's works. December 13th and 14th.--Lay in the same position. Dunteers, where breastworks were erected. December 13th, 14th, and 15th.--Remained in camp withouthe right of the brigade, next the road. December 13, 14, and 15.--Remained in same position. M T. Sweezy, Co. I, severe wound in leg, December thirteenth; privates, Horatio Showerman, Co. F, st, and to the north of Pipemaker's Creek. December 13.--Threw up breastworks in front of regimentof Brigadier-General commanding corps. December thirteenth and fourteenth, the entire time was occ only a few of the enemy's scouts there. December 13.--The usual constant artillery fire was kepnsylvania volunteers,Wounded, head, slight,13th December. 11Louis Harry,Private,I,147th Pennsylvanoccasional shots of artillery all night. December 13.--Still in the same position; we to-day imp D, killed by accidental discharge of gun. December 13th, private W. P. Nichols, Co. C, wounded by [2 more...]
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ...