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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McDonald, Flora 1720- (search)
McDonald, Flora 1720- Heroine; born in Milton, South Vist, Hebrides, in 1720; rescued Charles Edward Stuart, the Pretender, from his pursuers in 1746; married Allan McDonald in 1750; came to America in 1773, and settled among other Scotch families at Cross Creek (now Fayetteville), N. C. When the Revolutionary War broke out, she and her husband, like most of the Scotch people, espoused the cause of the crown. Her husband was a captain of the Loyal Highlanders in North Carolina, and was amo1720; rescued Charles Edward Stuart, the Pretender, from his pursuers in 1746; married Allan McDonald in 1750; came to America in 1773, and settled among other Scotch families at Cross Creek (now Fayetteville), N. C. When the Revolutionary War broke out, she and her husband, like most of the Scotch people, espoused the cause of the crown. Her husband was a captain of the Loyal Highlanders in North Carolina, and was among the defeated at Moore's Creek Bridge After experiencing various trials because of their political position. Flora and her family returned to Scotland before the close of the war, in which two of their sons were loyalist officers. One of them, John, became a distinguished man, and a fellow of the Royal Society. On her voyage to Scotland from America the ship was attacked by an enemy, and Flora, though nearly sixty years of age, bravely engaged in the fight and had her arm broken. The stir
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
lip Calvert1662 to 1676 Charles Calvert1677 to 1680 Thomas Notley1681 to 1689 Charles, Lord Baltimore1681 to 1689 Under the English government (Royal). John Coode and the Protestant association1690 to 1692 Sir Lionel Copley1692 to 1693 Francis Nicholson1694 to 1695 Nathaniel Blackstone1696 to 1702 Thomas Trench1703 to 1704 John Seymour1704 to 1708 Edward Lloyd1709 to 1713 John Hart1714 to 1715 Under the Baltimores restored (proprietary). John Hart1715 to 1719 Charles Calvert1720 to 1726 Benedict L. Calvert1727 to 1730 Samuel Ogle1731 to 1732 Charles, Lord Baltimore1732 to 1733 Samuel Ogle1734 to 1741 Thomas Bladen1742 to 1745 Samuel Ogle1746 to 1751 Benjamin Tasker1752 Horatio Sharpe1753 to 1768 Robert Eden1769 to 1774 Under the Continental Congress. Thomas Johnson1777 to 1779 Thomas Sim Lee1780 to 1782 William Paca1783 to 1784 William Smallwood1785 to 1788 Under the Constitution. John E. Howard1789 to 1790 George Plater1791 to 1792 Thomas Sim L
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- (search)
Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- Clergyman; born in Martha's Vineyard, Mass., Oct. 8, 1720; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and ordained minister of the West Church, Boston, in 1747, which post he held until his death, July 9, 1766. He was a zealous republican in politics, and his preaching and writing were remarkable for their controversial character. He warmly opposed the operations of the British Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, for he regarded it as an instrument for the spread of Episcopacy. He became involved in a controversy with Dr. Seeker, Archbishop of Canterbury, because the latter proposed the introduction of bishops into the colonies; co-operated with Otis and others in their resistance to measures of the British Parliament concerning the Americans; and was among the boldest of the Whigs. His death deprived the cause of a stanch champion.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mercer, Hugh 1720- (search)
Mercer, Hugh 1720- Military officer; born in Aberdeen, Scotland, about 1720; became a physician, and was assistant surgeon at the battle of Culloden, on the side of the Pretender, and was obliged to leave his country. He came to America in 1747, was a captain in the French and Indian War, was severely wounded in the battle Hugh Mercer. where Braddock was defeated, and received a medal from the corporation of Philadelphia for his prowess in that expedition. He was made lieutenant-colonel1720; became a physician, and was assistant surgeon at the battle of Culloden, on the side of the Pretender, and was obliged to leave his country. He came to America in 1747, was a captain in the French and Indian War, was severely wounded in the battle Hugh Mercer. where Braddock was defeated, and received a medal from the corporation of Philadelphia for his prowess in that expedition. He was made lieutenant-colonel in 1758; entered heartily into the military service when the Revolutionary War broke out, and was made colonel of the 3d Virginia Regiment in February, 1776. In June following Congress made him a brigadier-general. He led the column of attack at the battle of Trenton (q. v.), and at the council of war there he suggested the daring night march on Princeton. In the battle that ensued the following morning he was mortally wounded, and died Jan. 12, 1777. See Princeton, battle of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
Missouri, Was a part of what was originally known as Upper Louisiana. By the grant of Louis XIV. to Crozat, Sept. 14, 1712, all the country drained by the waters emptying, directly or indirectly, into the Mississippi River, is included in the boundaries of Louisiana. In northern Louisiana were included Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, and Nebraska. Below the Missouri the settlements were more rapid. In 1720 the discovery of lead-mines within its present borders drew adventurers there. Its oldest to town, St. Genevieve, was founded in 1755, and, by the treaty of Paris, in 1763, that whole region passed into the possession of the English. Already many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nash, Francis 1720- (search)
Nash, Francis 1720- Military officer; born in Prince Edward county, Va., May 10, 1720; brother of Abner Nash, governor of North Carolina; became clerk of the Superior Court of Orange county, N. C.; and was a captain, under the crown, on service under Governor Tryon against the Regulators. He was a member of the Provincial Congress of North Carolina in 1775, and was appointed by that body a lieutenant-colonel. In February, 1777, he was promoted to brigadiergeneral in the Continental army. Joining Washington before the battle at the Brandywine (Sept. 11, 1777), he participated in that action, and also at Germantown (Oct. 4), where he was mortally wounded, and died Oct. 7.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nicholson, Sir Francis 1687- (search)
Nicholson, Sir Francis 1687- Colonial governor; born in England; was lieutenantgovernor of New York under Andros, and acting governor in 1687-89. In 1694-99 he was governor of Maryland; in 1690-92 and 1699-1705, governor of Virginia. In 1710 he commanded the forces that captured Port Royal, Nova Scotia. Then he went to England, taking with him five Iroquois chiefs (who were presented to Queen Anne), to urge another attempt to conquer Canada. He commanded an unsuccessful expedition to that end the next year. In 1712-17 he was governor of Nova Scotia, and in 1720 was knighted. In 1721-25 he was governor of South Carolina, and on his return to England in the latter year he was made lieutenant-general.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Norridgewock, expedition to (search)
Norridgewock, expedition to The Jesuit mission under the charge of Father Rale, or Rasles, at Norridgewock, on the upper Kennebec, was an object of suspicion in Massachusetts for almost twenty years, for it was known that Rale had accompanied the French and Indians in their forays in the early part of Queen Anne's War. The Eastern Indians were in a bad humor in 1720, on account of encroachments upon their lands, and there were signs of hostility on their part, which, it was believed, had been excited by the Jesuit missionary. Finally, Father Rale was formally accused of stimulating the Eastern Indians to make war, and in August, 1721, the governor and council of Massachusetts agreed to send a secret expedition to Norridgewock to seize him. The expedition moved in January, 1722, but did not succeed in capturing Father Rale. His papers, seized by the assailants, who pillaged the chapel and the missionary's house, confirmed the suspicion. The Indians retorted for this attack by bu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Noyan, Charles Desire Amable Tranquille 1690-1739 (search)
Noyan, Charles Desire Amable Tranquille 1690-1739 Military officer; born in Ruffec, France, in 1690; accompanied Bienville on his expedition to Pensacola; and after the capture of that post was placed in partial charge. The fort, however, soon fell into the hands of 900 newly arrived Spanish marines. Soon after Bienville with the aid of Indians recaptured the place. In 1720-23 Noyan was appointed major of New Orleans; and in 1727 he established several colonies in western Mississippi. He died in New Orleans, La., in 1739.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parris, Samuel 1653-1720 (search)
Parris, Samuel 1653-1720 Clergyman; born in London, England, in 1653; was first a merchant and then a minister. It was in his family that Salem witchcraft began its terrible work, and he was the most zealous prosecutor of persons accused of the black art. In April, 1693, his church brought charges against him. He acknowledged his error and was dismissed. He preached in various places afterwards, but was an unhappy wanderer, and died in Sudbury, Mass., Feb. 27, 1720.
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