Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1747 AD or search for 1747 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Livingston, James 1747-1832 (search)
Livingston, James 1747-1832 Military officer; born in Canada, March 27, 1747; possessed some influence with the Canadians, and became colonel of a regiment of Canadian refugees, and, with them, joined General Montgomery. With these Livingston captured Fort Chambly, at the rapids of the Sorel, and he participated in the attack on Quebec. He was also in the battle of Bemis's Heights, and served throughout the Revolutionary War. He died in Saratoga county, N. Y., Nov. 29, 1832.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 (search)
Livingston, Robert R. 1747-1813 Statesman; born in New York City, Nov. 27, 1747; graduated at King's College in 1765; practised law successfully in New York, and was made recorder of the city in 1773. Of this office he was deprived early in 1775, because of his espousal of the patriot cause. He was elected to the Continental Congress in 1775, and was one of the committee appointed to draft a declaration of independence, but his necessary absence from Congress prevented his signing it. On the organization of the State of New York under a constitution, he was appointed chancellor, and held that post until 1801. In 1780 he was again a member of Congress, and was secretary for foreign affairs from 1781 to 1783. Mr. Livingston was a member of the convention of New York which adopted the national Constitution, and voted for it. Minister plenipotentiary to France, from 1801 to 1804, he secured the secession of Louisiana (q. v.) to the United States. He was the coadjutor of Fulton in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McLean, Sir Allan 1725-1784 (search)
McLean, Sir Allan 1725-1784 Military officer; born in Scotland, in 1725; was a lieutenant in a Scotch brigade in the service of the Dutch in 1747. He left that service in 1757, came to America, and was at the capture of Fort Duquesne in 1758. He served under Amherst in 1759, and was major-commander of the 114th Highlanders, which regiment he raised. He was made lieutenant-colonel in 1771, and in 1775 he came to America again, to fight the patriotic colonists. With a corps of Royal Highland emigrants, which he raised in Canada, he occupied Quebec late in 1775, and rendered great service during the siege by Montgomery. He commanded the fort at Penobscot in 1779, and was promoted brigadier-general after leaving America. He died in 1784.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- (search)
Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- Clergyman; born in Martha's Vineyard, Mass., Oct. 8, 1720; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and ordained minister of the West Church, Boston, in 1747, which post he held until his death, July 9, 1766. He was a zealous republican in politics, and his preaching and writing were remarkable for their controversial character. He warmly opposed the operations of the British Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, for he regarded it as an instrument for the spread of Episcopacy. He became involved in a controversy with Dr. Seeker, Archbishop of Canterbury, because the latter proposed the introduction of bishops into the colonies; co-operated with Otis and others in their resistance to measures of the British Parliament concerning the Americans; and was among the boldest of the Whigs. His death deprived the cause of a stanch champion.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mercer, Hugh 1720- (search)
Mercer, Hugh 1720- Military officer; born in Aberdeen, Scotland, about 1720; became a physician, and was assistant surgeon at the battle of Culloden, on the side of the Pretender, and was obliged to leave his country. He came to America in 1747, was a captain in the French and Indian War, was severely wounded in the battle Hugh Mercer. where Braddock was defeated, and received a medal from the corporation of Philadelphia for his prowess in that expedition. He was made lieutenant-colonel in 1758; entered heartily into the military service when the Revolutionary War broke out, and was made colonel of the 3d Virginia Regiment in February, 1776. In June following Congress made him a brigadier-general. He led the column of attack at the battle of Trenton (q. v.), and at the council of war there he suggested the daring night march on Princeton. In the battle that ensued the following morning he was mortally wounded, and died Jan. 12, 1777. See Princeton, battle of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parker, Sir Peter 1721-1811 (search)
Parker, Sir Peter 1721-1811 Naval officer; born in England in 1721; became a post-cap tain in the British navy in 1747. As com mander of a fleet, he co-operated with Sir Henry Clinton in an unsuccessful attack on Charleston, June 28, 1776. He afterwards assisted both Viscount General Howe and Admiral Lord Howe in the capture of New York, and commanded the squadron which took possession of Rhode Island late in that year. Afterwards he was a member of Parliament; was made admiral of the white, and on the death of Lord Howe (1799), as the oldest admiral Sir Peter Parker (from an English print). in the navy, he became admiral of the fleet. He died in England, Dec. 21, 1811.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), St.-ours, Jean Baptiste de 1668-1747 (search)
St.-ours, Jean Baptiste de 1668-1747 Military officer; born in Canada in 1668; joined the French Canadian army early in life; promoted lieutenant in 1702, and soon after garde-marine; was one of the three in command of the expedition against Fort Orange (now Albany) in 1708. At the head of about 200 Iroquois Indians St.-Ours took the village and fort of Haverhill. Later he was made major of Montreal, and afterwards was appointed king's lieutenant. He died in Montreal, Canada, in 1747. St.-ours, Jean Baptiste de 1668-1747 Military officer; born in Canada in 1668; joined the French Canadian army early in life; promoted lieutenant in 1702, and soon after garde-marine; was one of the three in command of the expedition against Fort Orange (now Albany) in 1708. At the head of about 200 Iroquois Indians St.-Ours took the village and fort of Haverhill. Later he was made major of Montreal, and afterwards was appointed king's lieutenant. He died in Montreal, Canada, in 1747.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Saratoga, attack upon (search)
of Saratoga, at the junction of Fish Creek and the Hudson. It was a scattered little village, composed mostly of the tenants of Philip Schuyler, who owned mills and a large landed estate there. Accompanied by Father Piquet, Marin, having laid waste nearly 50 miles of English settlements, fell upon the sleeping villagers at Saratoga at midnight (Nov. 28), plundered everything of value, murdered Mr. Schuyler, burned a small ungarrisoned fort near by and most of the dwellings, and made 109 men, women, and children captives. The next morning, after chanting the Te Deum in the midst of the desolation, the marauders turned their faces towards Canada with their prisoners. The fort was rebuilt, garrisoned, and called Fort Clinton; but late in 1747, unable to defend it against the French and Indians, it was burned by the English. For an account of the battles of Sept. 19, 1777, and Oct. 7, 1777, which led to the surrender of Burgoyne, see Bemis's Heights, battles of; Burgoyne, Sir John.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Scammel, Alexander 1747-1781 (search)
Scammel, Alexander 1747-1781 Military officer; born in Mendon (now Milford), Mass., March 24, 1747; graduated at Harvard College in 1769; taught school, practised surveying, and became proprietor of the town of Shapleigh, Me. In 1775 he was studying law with General Sullivan, when he left his books and joined the army at Cambridge as Sullivan's brigade-major. He was with him in the battle of Long Island, and of Trenton and Princeton; was especially distinguished at Saratoga; and from 1778 to 1781 was adjutant-general of the army. He commanded a regiment of light infantry in the siege of Yorktown, where he was surprised, and surrendered, but was so badly wounded that he died in Williamsburg, Va., Oct. 6, 1781.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schlatter, Michael 1716-1790 (search)
Schlatter, Michael 1716-1790 Clergyman; born in St. Gall, Switzerland, July 14, 1716; educated at the University of Helmstedt; ordained in the German Reformed Church; settled in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1746, and became pastor of the united churches of Philadelphia and Germantown in 1747. He returned to Europe in 1751, and appealed for help in Holland and England for free schools among the Germans in America. This appeal resulted in a fund of over £20,000. Schlatter retired from the active pastorate in 1755, and devoted himself to founding schools. He served in the Royal American army as chaplain in 1757-59. When the Revolutionary War began he sympathized with the patriots; was imprisoned by the British in September, 1777, and had his house sacked, because he refused to obey their orders. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., in November, 1790
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