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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1759 AD or search for 1759 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York City (search)
inactivity. A glow of patriotism warmed the Provincial Congress, and that body speedily adopted measures for fortifying the city and its approaches and garrisoning it with 2,000 men. On the day when Lee entered New York Sir Henry Clinton arrived at Sandy Hook, but did not deem it prudent to enter the harbor. Captured by the British. General Howe selected Sept. 13, 1776, for the landing of his army on New York Island from Long Island. It was the anniversary of the capture of Quebec, in 1759, in which he had participated. The watchword was Quebec! the countersign was Wolfe! In the afternoon four armed ships, keeping up an incessant fire on the American batteries, passed them into the East River, and anchored, but no landing was attempted that day. On the next day, about sunset, six British vessels ran up the East River, and on the 15th three others entered the Hudson, and anchored off Bloomingdale. Washington's army had escaped capture on Long Island, but had to contend, in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Niagara, Fort (search)
discouraged by the news of Braddock's defeat. Shirley's force was 2,500 in number on Sept. 1. He began the erection of two strong forts at Oswego, one on each side of the river. The prevalence of storms, sickness in his camp, and the desertion of a greater part of his Indian allies, caused him to relinquish the design against Niagara; so, leaving a sufficient number of men at Oswego to complete and garrison the forts, he marched the remainder back to Albany, where he arrived Oct. 24. In 1759, accompanied by Sir William Johnson as his second in command, Gen. John Prideaux collected his forces (chiefly provincial) at Oswego, for an attack on Fort Niagara. The influence of Sir William made the Six Nations disregard their late treaty of neutrality with the French, and a considerable number joined Prideaux's forces. Sailing from Oswego, the troops reached their destination, and landed, without opposition, on July 7, and immediately began a siege. On the 19th Prideaux was killed b
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nogaret, Stanislas Henry Lucien de 1682-1759 (search)
Nogaret, Stanislas Henry Lucien de 1682-1759 Colonist; born in Marseilles, France, in 1682; enlisted in the army about 1698; ordered to Louisiana in 1716; and later appointed commander of Fort Rosalie. In 1729 the Natchez Indians burned this fort and murdered nearly all the settlers in its vicinity. Nogaret, with a few others, escaped, and a few months afterwards returned with a French force, defeated the Indians, and restored the fort. He published Precis des établissements fondes dann 1716; and later appointed commander of Fort Rosalie. In 1729 the Natchez Indians burned this fort and murdered nearly all the settlers in its vicinity. Nogaret, with a few others, escaped, and a few months afterwards returned with a French force, defeated the Indians, and restored the fort. He published Precis des établissements fondes dans la vallee du Mississippi par Le Chevalier Le Moyne de Bienville, suivi d'une histoire des guerres avec les Indiens Natchez. He died in Paris in 1759
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North, Frederick 1733-1792 (search)
North, Frederick 1733-1792 Second Earl of Guilford, and eighth Baron North, statesman; born in England, April 13, 1733; educated at Eton and at Trinity College, Cambridge, he made a lengthened tour on the Continent. In 1754 he entered Parliament for Banbury, which he represented almost thirty years; and entered the cabinet under Pitt, in 1759, as commissioner of the treasury. He warmly supported the Stamp Act (1764-65) and the right of Parliament to tax the colonies. In 1766 he was appointed paymaster of the forces, and the next year was made chancellor of the exchequer, succeeding Charles Townshend as leader of the House of Commons. He became prime minister in 1770, and he held that post during the American Revolutionary War. In February, 1775, Lord North received information from Benjamin Franklin (q. v.), which greatly disheartened him, and he dreaded a war with the colonists which his encouragement of the King's obstinacy was provoking, and, armed with the King's consent i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parsons, Samuel Holden 1737- (search)
Parsons, Samuel Holden 1737- Military officer; born in Lyme, Conn., May 14, 1737; graduated at Harvard College in 1756; admitted to the bar in 1759; was a representative in the Connecticut Assembly for eighteen sessions. He was an active patriot at the beginning of the Revolution. He was made colonel of a Connecticut regiment in 1775, and engaged in the siege of Boston. In August, 1776, he was made a brigadier-general, and as such engaged in the battle on Long Island. In 1779 Parsons succeeded General Putnam in command of the Connecticut line, and in 1780 was commissioned a majorgeneral. At the close of the war he resumed the practice of law, and was appointed by Washington first judge of the Northwestern Territory. He was also employed to treat with the Indians for the extinguishment of their titles to the Connecticut Western Reserve, in northern Ohio. He went to the new territory in 1787; settled there; and was drowned in the Big Beaver River, Ohio, Nov. 17, 1789.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penobscot. (search)
f a French fort in Acadia, sent a French manof-war to Penobscot and took possession of the Plymouth trading-house there, with all its goods. A vessel was sent from Plymouth to recover the property. The French fortified the place, and were so strongly intrenched that the expedition was abandoned. The Plymouth people never afterwards recovered their interest at Penobscot. The first permanent English occupation of the region of the Penobscot—to which the French laid claim—was acquired in 1759, when Governor Pownall, of Massachusetts, with the consent of the legislature, caused a fort to be built on the western bank of the Penobscot (afterwards Fort Knox), near the village of Prospect, which was named Fort Pownall. An armed force from Massachusetts took possession of the region, built the fort, cut off the communications of the Eastern Indians (the only ones then hostile to the English), and so ended the contest for the Penobscot region by arms. In 1799 a British force of sever
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pepperell, Sir, William 1696-1759 (search)
Pepperell, Sir, William 1696-1759 Military officer; born in Kittery, Me., June 27, 1696. His father, a Welshman, came to New England as apprentice to a fisherman, where he married. The son became a merchant, amassed a large fortune, and became an influential man. Fitted by temperament for military life, he was frequently engaged against the Indians, and attained much distinction. About 1727 he was appointed one of his Majesty's council for the province of Massachusetts, and held the offiice of common pleas in 1730, he be- Sir William Pepperell's House at Kittery, me. came eminent as a jurist. In 1745 he commanded the successful expedition against Louisburg, and was knighted. On visiting England in 1749, he was commissioned colonel in the British army; Sir William Pepperell. became major-general in 1755; and lieutenant-general in 1759. From 1756 to 1758 Sir William was acting governor of Massachusetts before the arrival of Pownall. He died in Kittery, Me., July 6, 1759.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pownall, Fort, erection of (search)
Pownall, Fort, erection of Governor Pownall, of Massachusetts, took possession of the country around the Penobscot River in 1759, and secured it by the erection of a fort there. It was done by 400 men granted by Massachusetts for the purpose, at a cost of about $15,000, and named Fort Pownall.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Preble, Jedediah 1707-1784 (search)
Preble, Jedediah 1707-1784 Military officer; born in Wells. Me., in 1707; father of Edward Treble; was a sailor in early life, and in 1746 was a captain in a provincial regiment. He was a lieutenant-colonel under General Winslow at the dispersion of the Acadians in 1755. He rose to the rank of brigadier-general in 1759, and was twelve years a Representative. In 1774 the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts made him a brigadier-general. He was a State Senator in 1780, and judge of the Supreme Court. He died in Portland, Me., March 11, 1784.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Prideaux, John 1718- (search)
Prideaux, John 1718- Military officer; born in Devonshire, England, in 1718; a son of Sir John Prideaux; entered the army, and was appointed captain in 1745, colonel in 1758, and brigadier-general in 1759. Intrusted with the duty of reducing Fort Niagara, he led a strong force against it, and during a siege he was instantly killed by the bursting of a cannon, July 19, 1759.
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