Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cruger, Henry, Jr. 1739-1780 (search)
Cruger, Henry, Jr. 1739-1780 Merchant; born in New York City, in 1739. His father became a merchant in Bristol, England, where he died in 1780. Henry was associated with him in trade, and succeeded him as mayor of Bristol in 1781. He had been elected to Parliament as the colleague of Edmund Burke in 1774, and was re-elected in 1784, and on all occasions advocated conciliatory measures towards his countrymen. After the war he became a merchant in New York, and, while yet a member of the Bristol, England, where he died in 1780. Henry was associated with him in trade, and succeeded him as mayor of Bristol in 1781. He had been elected to Parliament as the colleague of Edmund Burke in 1774, and was re-elected in 1784, and on all occasions advocated conciliatory measures towards his countrymen. After the war he became a merchant in New York, and, while yet a member of the British Parliament, was elected to the Senate of the State of New York. He died in New York, April 24, 1827.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Daggett, Naphtali, 1727- (search)
Daggett, Naphtali, 1727- Clergyman; born in Attleboro, Mass., Sept. 8, 1727; graduated at Yale College in 1748; ordained pastor of a Presbyterian church at Smithtown, Long Island, in 1751; and in 1755 was chosen professor of divinity at Yale, which place he held until his death, in New Haven, Conn., Nov. 25, 1780. In 1766, on the resignation of President Clap, he was chosen president of the college pro tempore and officiated in that capacity more than a year. He was an active patriot when the War of the Revolution broke out; and when the British attacked New Haven, in 1779, he took part in the resistance made by the citizens and surrounding militia. Dr. Daggett was made a prisoner, and the severe treatment to which he was subjected so shattered his constitution that he never recovered his health. After the famous dark day (q. v.), in 1780, he published an account of it.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dana, Francis, 1743-1811 (search)
Dana, Francis, 1743-1811 Jurist; born in Charlestown, Mass., June 13, 1743; son of Richard Dana; graduated at Harvard in 1762. He was admitted to the bar in 1767; was an active patriot; a delegate to the Provincial Congress in 1774; went to England in 1775 with confidential letters to Franklin; was a member of the executive council from 1776 to 1780; member of the Continental Congress from 1776 to 1778, and again in 1784; member of the board of war, Nov. 17, 1777; and was at the head of a committee charged with the entire reorganization of the army. When Mr. Adams went on an embassy to negotiate a treaty of peace and commerce with Great Britain, Mr. Dana was secretary of the legation. At Paris, early in 1781, he received the appointment from Congress of minister to Russia, clothed with power to make the accession of the United States to the armed neutrality. He resided two years at St. Petersburg, and returned to Berlin in 1783. He was again in Congress in the spring of 178
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Witt, Simeon, 1756-1834 (search)
De Witt, Simeon, 1756-1834 Surveyor; born in Ulster county, N. Y., Dec. 26, 1756; graduated at Queen's (now Rutgers) College in 1776; joined the army under Gates; and was made assistant geographer to the army in 1778, and chief geographer in 1780. He was surveyorgeneral of New York fifty years (1784-1834). In 1796 he declined the appointment of surveyor-general of the United States. He was regent, vice-chancellor, and chancellor of the State of New York, member of many learned societies, and author of Elements of Perspective (1835). He died in Ithaca, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1834.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Zeng, Frederick Augustus, Baron, 1756-1838 (search)
De Zeng, Frederick Augustus, Baron, 1756-1838 military officer; born in Dresden, Saxony, in 1756; came to America in 1780 as captain in one of the Hessian regiments; and at the end of the Revolutionary War married an American lady and settled in Red Hook, N. Y. He was naturalized in 1789, and became intimate with Chancellor Livingston, Governor Clinton, General Schuyler, and others, and was greatly interested in the opening of canals and in the navigation of the interior waters and lakes. He died in Clyde, N. Y., April 26, 1838.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duane, James, 1733-1797 (search)
Duane, James, 1733-1797 Jurist; born in New York City, Feb. 6, 1733; inherited a large estate at the site of Duanesburg, which he began to settle in 1765. In 1759 he married a daughter of Col. Robert Livingston. He became an active patriot in the Revolution; was a member of the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duane, William John, 1780-1865 (search)
Duane, William John, 1780-1865 Lawyer; born in Ireland in 1780; was Secretary of the United States Treasury in 1833, but was opposed to General Jackson's action in the matter of the United States Bank, and was therefore removed from office. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 27, 1865. Duane, William John, 1780-1865 Lawyer; born in Ireland in 1780; was Secretary of the United States Treasury in 1833, but was opposed to General Jackson's action in the matter of the United States Bank, and was therefore removed from office. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 27, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellsworth, Oliver, 1745-1807 (search)
Ellsworth, Oliver, 1745-1807 Ll.D., jurist; born in Windsor, Conn., April 29, 1745; Oliver Ellsworth. graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1766; was admitted to the bar in 1771; practised in Hartford, Conn.; and was made State attorney. When the Revolutionary War was kindling he took the side of the patriots in the legislature of Connecticut, and was a delegate in Congress from 1777 to 1780. He became a member of the State council, and in 1784 was appointed a judge of the Supreme Court. Judge Ellsworth was one of the framers of the national Constitution, but, being called away before the adjournment of the convention, his name was not attached to that instrument. He was the first United States Senator from Connecticut (1789-95), and drew up the bill for organizing the Judiciary Department. In 1796 he was made chief-justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, and at the close of 1799 he was one of the envoys to France. He died in Windsor, Nov. 26, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Estaing, Charles Henry Theodat, Count Da, 1729- (search)
nvoy, a part of the way, the homeward-bound West Indiamen of the mercantile marine. During his absence a detachment from Martinique captured the English island of St. Vincent. Being largely reinforced soon afterwards, D'Estaing sailed with his whole fleet and conquered the island of Grenada. Before the conquest was quite completed Byron returned, when an indecisive engagement took place, and the much-damaged British fleet put into St. Christopher's. D'Estaing then sailed (August, 1779) to escort, part of the way, the homeward-bound French West Indiamen; and, returning, engaged jointly with the American army in the siege of Savannah, but abandoned the contest before a promised victory for the allies was won. He returned to France in 1780, and in 1783 he commanded the combined fleets of France and Spain, and was made a Spanish grandee. He favored the French Revolution, and commanded the National Guards at Versailles, but falling under the suspicion of the Terrorists, he was beheaded.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Featherstonhaugh, George William 1780-1866 (search)
Featherstonhaugh, George William 1780-1866 Traveller; born in 1780; made geological surveys in the West for the United States War Department in 1834-35. Owing to his knowledge of North America he was appointed a commissioner by Great Britain to determine the northwestern boundary between the United States and Canada, under the Ashburton-Webster treaty. His publications include Geological report of the elevated country between the Missouri and Red rivers; Observations on the Ashburton tr1780; made geological surveys in the West for the United States War Department in 1834-35. Owing to his knowledge of North America he was appointed a commissioner by Great Britain to determine the northwestern boundary between the United States and Canada, under the Ashburton-Webster treaty. His publications include Geological report of the elevated country between the Missouri and Red rivers; Observations on the Ashburton treaty; Excursion through the slave States, etc. He died in Havre, France, Sept. 28, 1866.
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