hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 257 results in 222 document sections:

... 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Methodist Episcopal Church, South, (search)
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, a religious body organized at a convention in Louisville, Ky., in 1845, by a number of annual Methodist conferences in the Southern States. The slavery agitation was the cause of the separation of the Northern and Southern Methodists. As early as 1780 a conference held at Baltimore adopted a resolution requiring itinerant preachers who owned slaves to set them free, and urging lay slave-holders to do the same. In 1789 the following sentence appeared in the rules of discipline which prohibited certain things: The buying or selling the bodies and souls of men, women, or children, with an intention to enslave them. In 1816 the general conference passed an act that no slave-holder could hold any office in the Church, except in such States where the laws did not admit of emancipation and permit the liberated slave to enjoy freedom. The agitation caused by slavery which continually disturbed the Church culminated in a serious condition in 1844, w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Middleton, Arthur 1742- (search)
ver, S. C., June 26, 1742; was educated at Harrow and Westminster schools, England, graduating at Cambridge University in 1764. After his marriage he became a planter, and in politics a leader of the patriots, and a most efficient member of the council of safety. In 1776 he helped to frame the State constitution, and was sent to Congress, where he voted for and signed the Declaration of Independence. In 1779 he took up arms in defence of Charleston, and was made a prisoner when it fell, in 1780, when his estate was sequestered and he was sent a prisoner, first to St. Augustine, and then to the prison-ship Jersey. In 1781 he was exchanged, and was a member of Congress from 1781 to 1783. He was a skilful stenographer, and took notes of the debates in which he was engaged. Mr. Middleton wrote some effective political essays over the signature of Andrew marvel. He died on Goose Creek, S. C., Jan. 1, 1787. His father, Henry Middleton, was president of Congress in 1775; and his grand
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Milledge, John 1757- (search)
Milledge, John 1757- Statesman; born in Savannah, Ga., in 1757; was brought up in the office of the King's attorney of Georgia, but when the Revolutionary War approached he took the side of the colonists. He was one of the party who captured Governor Wright (see Wright, Sir James). He was active in civil and military affairs in Georgia during the war, and in 1780 was appointed attorney-general of the State. From 1792 to 1802 he was a member of Congress, excepting one term, and from 1802 to 1806 was governor of the State. He was the principal founder of the University of Georgia, and the legislature of his State evinced their profound respect for him by giving his name to the capital of Georgia. He died on the Sand Hills, near Augusta, Ga., Feb. 9. 1818.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
eady many of the Canadian French had settled on the borders of the Mississippi. Lands were liberally granted to the colonists by the English. Emigrants from Spain flocked in. In 1775 St. Louis, which had been first a fur-trading establishment, contained 800 inhabitants, and St. Genevieve about 460. In the region of Missouri there were soon stirring events; for Spain, taking sides with the Americans, made war on the English, and that country became master of lower Louisiana and Florida. In 1780 the British from the Lakes attacked St. Louis, but the timely arrival of Col. George Rogers Clarke (q. v.) in Illinois saved it from capture. After the war Spain retained Louisiana, and the country on the east bank of the Mississippi became the property of the United States. American settlers crossed the Mississippi, and collisions with the Spanish authorities ensued. Diplomacy settled the disputes, and the navigation of the Mississippi was made free to both parties. The purchase of L
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Monk's corner, (search)
Monk's corner, The scene of a notable surprise of American cavalry. While the British were besieging Charleston in 1780 General Lincoln endeavored to keep an open communication with the country, across the Cooper River, so as to receive reinforcements, and, if necessary, to make a retreat. To close that communication Sir Henry Clinton detached Lieutenant-Colonel Webster, with 1,400 men. The advanced guard, composed of Tarleton's legion and Ferguson's corps, surprised the American cavalry (about 300 men), with militia attached to them, under the command of Gen. Isaac Huger, who were stationed at Biggin's Bridge, near Monk's Corner. The Americans were attacked just at dawn (April 14) and were scattered. Twenty-five of the Americans were killed; the remainder fled to the swamps. Tarleton secured nearly 300 horses, and, after closing Lincoln's communications with the country, he returned to the British camp in triumph.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Monroe, James 1759-1870 (search)
1776; immediately joined the patriot army as a cadet in Mercer's regiment; and was in the engagements at Harlem Plains, White Plains, and Trenton. He Was wounded in the latter engagement, and was promoted to a captaincy for his bravery. In 1777-78 he was aide to Lord Stirling, and was distinguished at the battles of Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth. After the latter battle he left the army, studied law under Jefferson, and again took up arms when Virginia was invaded by Cornwallis. In 1780 he visited the Southern army under De Kalb as military commissioner from Virginia, and was a member of the Virginia Assembly in 1782. He soon became a member of the executive council, a delegate in Congress, and in his State convention in 1788 he opposed the ratification of the national Constitution. From 1790 to 1794 he was United States Senator. In May of the latter year he was appointed minister to France, though an opponent of Washington's administration, but was recalled in 1796, beca
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morris, Gouverneur 1752- (search)
Morris, Gouverneur 1752- Lawyer; born in Morrisania, N. Y., Jan. 31, 1752; graduated at King's College (now Columbia University) in 1768; admitted to the bar in 1771, and soon acquired great reputation as a lawyer. One of the committee that drafted the constitution of the State of New York, a member of Congress from 1777 to 1780, and one of the most useful of committeemen in that body, he gained much political influence. In 1779 he published a pamphlet containing Observations on the American Revolution. In 1781 he was the assistant of Robert Morris, the superintendent of finance. After living in Philadelphia six years, he purchased (1786) the estate of Morrisania from his brother, and made it his residence afterwards. Prominent in the convention that framed the national Constitution, he put that instrument into the literary shape in which it was adopted. In 1791 he was sent to London as private agent of the United States, and from 1792 to 1794 was American minister to Franc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morris, Robert 1734-1806 (search)
d. My note and my honor; Morris replied. Thou shalt have it! was the response of the Quaker; and the next day Morris wrote to Washington, I was up early this morning to despatch a supply of $50,000 to your excellency. He served in Congress at different times during the war, and at the same time was largely engaged in managing the financial affairs of the country, making use of his personal credit to support the public credit. With other citizens he established a bank in Philadelphia in 1780, by which means the army was largely sustained. In 1781 he supplied almost everything to carry on the campaign against Cornwallis. When Washington received a letter from Count de Grasse saying that he could not yet leave the West Indies, Morris was at headquarters at Dobb's Ferry with Richard Peters, secretary of the board of war. The commander-inchief was sorely disappointed, for he saw little chance of success against the British at New York without the aid of a French fleet. He instant
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morristown, encampment at (search)
uarters at Morristown in May, had swelled to 14,000. He had maintained through the winter and spring a line of cantonments from the Delaware River to the Hudson Highlands. Washington and his army again encamped at Morristown in the winter of 1779-80. In 1777 his headquarters were at Freeman's Tavern; in 1780 he occupied as such the fine mansion in the suburbs of the village belonging to the widow Ford. The building was purchased several years ago for the purpose of preserving it, by a patrioine of cantonments from the Delaware River to the Hudson Highlands. Washington and his army again encamped at Morristown in the winter of 1779-80. In 1777 his headquarters were at Freeman's Tavern; in 1780 he occupied as such the fine mansion in the suburbs of the village belonging to the widow Ford. The building was purchased several years ago for the purpose of preserving it, by a patriotic association, which has gathered within it a large and interesting collection of Revolutionary relics.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Moultrie, William 1731-1805 (search)
Moultrie, William 1731-1805 Military officer; born in South Carolina in 1731; was captain of infantry in the Cherokee War; William Moultrie. member of the Provincial Congress from St. Helena parish in 1775, and was made colonel of the 2d South Carolina Regiment in June of that year. He gained great fame by his defence of Fort Sullivan (see Charleston), in Charleston Harbor. In September, 1776, he was made a brigadier-general. He was engaged in the local service, and in May, 1779, with 1,000 militia, opposed the advance of Prevost upon Charleston, which he held until Lincoln relieved him. He was distinguished at the siege of Charleston in 1780, was made a prisoner, and remained so until 1782, when he was exchanged for Burgoyne. While a prisoner he wrote his Memoirs, published in 1802. In October of that year, he was promoted major-general, and was governor of South Carolina in 1785-86 and 1794-96. He died in Charleston, S. C., Sept. 27, 1805.
... 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 ...