Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Charleston, S. C. (search)
Charleston, S. C. City, port of entry, and commercial metropolis of South Carolina; on a peninsula between the Cooper and Ashley rivers, which unite in forming an admirable harbor; 82 miles northeast of Savannah, Ga. The city was founded in 1680 by an English colony; was occupied by the British in 1780-82; and was the State capital till 1790. It has been the scene of many stirring and historical events. The celebrated Democratic National Convention of 1860 was opened here, and after the split among the delegates an adjourned session was held in Baltimore. It was the birthplace, the same year, of the Secession movement; the first act of hostility to the national government occurred here (see Sumter, Fort; Beauregard, Pierre Gustave Toutant); was besieged and bombarded during the last two years of the war; and was evacuated by the Confederates on Feb. 17, 1865. On Aug. 31, 1886, a large part of the city was destroyed by an earthquake, in which many lives were lost. In the fi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chastellux, Francois Jean, Chevalier De (search)
Chastellux, Francois Jean, Chevalier De Historian; born in Paris, France, in 1734; served in the American Revolution under Rochambeau as a major-general. His amiability gained him the friendship of Washington. He was the author of Voyage dans l'amerique septentrionale dans les annees 1780-82; Discours sur les avantages et les dessavantages qui resultent pour l'europe de la decouverte de l'amerique, etc. He also translated into French Humphrey's Address to the army of the United States. He died in Paris, Oct. 28, 1788.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Choisi, Claude Gabriel de 1741- (search)
Choisi, Claude Gabriel de 1741- Military officer; born in France; entered the French Army June 16, 1741; came to America in 1780; was given command of a brigade with which, in conjunction with Lauzun's cavalry, he defeated Tarleton Oct. 3, 1781. During the Reign of Terror in France, through his friendship for the King, he was imprisoned and, it is supposed, died there.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cifuentes, Fray Bernardino 1725-1780 (search)
Cifuentes, Fray Bernardino 1725-1780 Clergyman; born in Segovia, Spain, July 24, 1725; was educated at the University of Salamanca; entered the Franciscan order about 1760; and later came to America. In June, 1770, a number of Spanish missionaries crossed Arizona and entered California, where a white cloth bearing the inscription Mission de Fray Bernardino was raised on a staff. By 1778 this mission had grown to be a settlement of 200 inhabitants, and when California became a part of the a; entered the Franciscan order about 1760; and later came to America. In June, 1770, a number of Spanish missionaries crossed Arizona and entered California, where a white cloth bearing the inscription Mission de Fray Bernardino was raised on a staff. By 1778 this mission had grown to be a settlement of 200 inhabitants, and when California became a part of the United States it was a large town. The name of the place was afterwards changed to San Bernardino. He died in California about 1780.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Clymer, George 1739-1813 (search)
813 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Philadelphia in 1739; was an active patriot during the war for independence, and a member of the council of safety in Philadelphia. In July, 1775, he was made joint treasurer of Pennsylvania with Mr. Hillegas; and when, in December, 1776. Congress fled to Baltimore, Clymer was one of the commissioners left in Philadelphia to attend to the public interests. In 1777 he was a commissioner to treat with the Indians at Fort Pitt; and in 1780 he assisted in organizing the Bank of North America. At the close of the war he made his residence at Princeton, N. J.; and in 1784 was a member of the Pennsylvania legislature. In 1787 he was a member of the convention that framed the national Constitution, and was a member of the first Congress under it. A collector of the excise duties in 1791 which led to the Whiskey insurrection (q. v.), and serving on a commission to treat with Southern Indians, Mr. Clymer, after concluding a treaty (
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Comanche Indians, (search)
nd the tribes on the central plains, like the Pawnees, felt their power in war from an early period. They called themselves by a name signifying live people, believed in one supreme Father, and claim to have come from towards the setting sun. The tribe is divided into several bands, and all are expert horsemen. The French in Louisiana first penetrated their country in 1718, buying horses from them, and in 1724 made a treaty with them. They were then numerous. One village visited by the French had 140 lodges, containing 1,500 women, 2,000 children, and 800 warriors. Until 1783, they had long and bloody wars with the Spaniards, when, their great war-chief being slain, a peace was established. They numbered 5,000 in 1780. In 1816 they lost 4,000 of their population by small-pox. As late as 1847 their number was estimated at 10,000, with over 2,000 warriors; in 1872, a little over 4,000. They have always been troublesome. In 1899 there were 1,553 at the Kiowa agency in Oklahoma.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Constitution of the United States (search)
Constitution of the United States Sagacious men perceived the utter inefficiency of the articles of Confederation (q. v.) as a constitution of a national government as early as 1780, while their ratification by the States was pending. Alexander Hamilton, then only twenty-three years of age, in a long letter to James Duane, in Congress, dated At the liberty Pole, Sept. 3, gave an outline sketch of a national constitution, and suggested the calling of a convention to frame such a system of government. During the following year he published in the New York packet (then published at Fishkill, N. Y.) a series of papers under the title of The Constitutionalist, which were devoted chiefly to the discussion of the defects of the Articles of Confederation. In the summer of 1782 he succeeded in having the subject brought before the legislature of New York, then in session at Poughkeepsie, and that body, by a resolution drawn by Hamilton and presented by his father-in-law, General Schuyler
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornell, Ezekiel 1780- (search)
Cornell, Ezekiel 1780- Military officer; born in Scituate, R. I.; was self-educated. When the Revolutionary War began he entered the army as lieutenant-colonel of Hitchcock's regiment, and was present at the siege of Boston; later was promoted brigadier-general; and commanded a brigade of State troops which were of much service during the occupation of Massachusetts by the British. In 1780-83 he was a member of the Continental Congress and chairman of the military committee. Cornell, Ezekiel 1780- Military officer; born in Scituate, R. I.; was self-educated. When the Revolutionary War began he entered the army as lieutenant-colonel of Hitchcock's regiment, and was present at the siege of Boston; later was promoted brigadier-general; and commanded a brigade of State troops which were of much service during the occupation of Massachusetts by the British. In 1780-83 he was a member of the Continental Congress and chairman of the military committee.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
ced by five British battalions front New York, while expected reinforcements from the northern army were still delayed through the bad conduct of General Gates. The consequence was the forced abandonment of Fort Mercer, at Red Bank, and the levelling of its ramparts by the British troops. The leaders of both armies recrossed the Delaware, Cornwallis to Philadelphia and Greene to the camp of Washington. Lord Cornwallis was left in chief command of about 4,000 troops when, in the summer of 1780. Sir Henry Clinton departed for New York. The earl, for the purpose of rooting out all signs of rebellion, sought, by cruel acts, to completely subdue the people through fear. He issued proclamations and instructions which encouraged hostility towards every patriot; and under these instructions his agents and the Tories committed many crimes. Tarleton and his legion spread terror in many districts. A quartermaster of his command entered the house of Samuel Wyley, near Camden, and cut him
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cow Chace, the (search)
Cow Chace, the In the summer of 1780 Washington sent General Wayne, with a considerable force, to storm a British block-house at Bull's Ferry, on the Hudson, near Fort Lee, and to drive into the American camp a large number of cattle on Bergen Neck exposed to British foragers, who might go out from Paulus's Hook (now Jersey City). Wayne was repulsed at the block-house, with a loss of sixty-four men, but returned to camp with a large number of cattle driven by his dragoons. This event inspired Major Andre, Sir Henry Clinton's adjutant-general, to write a satirical poem, which he called The Cow Chace, in which Wayne and his fellow-rebels were severely ridiculed. It was written in the style of the English ballad of Chevy Chace, in three cantos. The following is a copy of the poem; we also give fac-similes of its title from Andreā€˜s autograph, and of the concluding verse of the original: Elizabethtown, Aug. 1, 1780. Canto I. To drive the kine one summer's morn, The tanner took
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