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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 1 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 1 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 1 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 1 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 1 1 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1780 AD or search for 1780 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 257 results in 222 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ferguson, Patrick 1777- (search)
Ferguson, Patrick 1777- Military officer; born in England; son of Judge James Ferguson and a nephew of Lord Elibank; entered the British army at the age of eighteen, and came to America in the spring of 1777, serving under Cornwallis, first in the North and then in the South. After the siege of Charleston in 1780 he was promoted to major, and was detached by Cornwallis to embody the Tories in South Carolina. He was killed in the battle of King's Mountain (q. v.), Oct. 7, 1780.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Few, William 1748-1828 (search)
Few, William 1748-1828 Jurist; born in Baltimore county, Md., June 8, 1748. His ancestors came to America with William Penn. His family went to North Carolina in 1758, and in 1776 William settled in Georgia, where he became a councillor, and assisted in framing the State constitution. He was in the military service, and in 1778 was made State surveyor-general. In 1780-83 and 1786 he was in Congress, and in 1787 assisted in framing the national Constitution. He was United States Senator in 1789-93; and was a judge on the bench of Georgia three years. In the summer of 1799 he removed to New York, and became a member of the legislature and a commissioner of loans. He died in Fishkill, N. Y., July 16, 1828.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fishing Creek, action at. (search)
Fishing Creek, action at. When General Gates was approaching Camden in 1780 he sent General Sumter with a detachment to intercept a convoy of stores passing from Ninety-six to Rawdon's camp at Camden. Sumter was successful. He captured forty-four wagons loaded with clothing and made a number of prisoners. On hearing of the defeat of Gates, Sumter continued his march up the Catawba River and encamped (Aug. 18) near the mouth of Fishing Creek. There he was surprised by Tarleton, and his troops were routed with great slaughter. More than fifty were killed and 300 were made prisoners. Tarleton recaptured the British prisoners and all the wagons and their contents. Sumter escaped, and in such haste that he rode into Charlotte, N. C., without hat or saddle.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fleury, Louis 1740- (search)
educated for an engineer, and, coming to America, received a captain's commission from Washington. For his good conduct in the campaign of 1777, Congress gave him a horse and commission of lieutenantcolonel, Nov. 26, 1777; and in the winter of 1778 he was inspector under Steuben. He was adjutant-general of Lee's division in June, 1779, and was so distinguished Medal awarded to Lieutenant-Colonel De Fleury. at the assault on Stony Point, July, 1779, that Congress gave him thanks and a silver medal. De Fleury returned to France soon after the affair at Stony Point, before the medal was struck; and it was probably never in his possession, for it seems to have been lost, probably while Congress was in session at Princeton. In April, 1859, a boy found it while digging in a garden at Princeton. De Fleury, on his return to France, joined the French troops under Rochambeaux sent to America in 1780. Subsequently he became a field marshal of France, and was executed in Paris, in 1794.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Flint, Timothy 1780-1840 (search)
Flint, Timothy 1780-1840 Clergyman; born in Reading, Mass., July 11, 1780; graduated at Harvard in 1880; became minister of the Congregational Church at Lunenburg, Mass., in 1802, but resigned in 1814. He went West as a missionary, but was obliged to give up in consequence of ill health. He then devoted himself to literature, and edited the Western review in Cincinnati, and, for a short time, the Knickerbocker magazine in New York. Among his publications are Recollections of ten years passed in the Valley of the Mississippi; Biography and history of the Western States in the Mississippi Valley (2 volumes); Indian wars of the West; Memoir of Daniel Boone, etc. He died in Salem, Mass., Aug. 16, 1840.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Flower, George 1780-1862 (search)
Flower, George 1780-1862 Colonist; born in Hertfordshire, England, about 1780; came to the United States with Morris Birkbeck in 1817; and established an English colony in Albion, Ill. In 1823 when an attempt was made to give legality to slavery in that State it was his influence that defeated the measure. He was the author of a History of the English settlement in Edwards county, Illinois, founded in 1817 and 1818 by Morris Birkbeck and George Flower. He died in Grayville, Ill., Jan. 15,er, George 1780-1862 Colonist; born in Hertfordshire, England, about 1780; came to the United States with Morris Birkbeck in 1817; and established an English colony in Albion, Ill. In 1823 when an attempt was made to give legality to slavery in that State it was his influence that defeated the measure. He was the author of a History of the English settlement in Edwards county, Illinois, founded in 1817 and 1818 by Morris Birkbeck and George Flower. He died in Grayville, Ill., Jan. 15, 1862.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Foote, Samuel Augustus 1780-1846 (search)
Foote, Samuel Augustus 1780-1846 Legislator; born in Cheshire, Conn., Nov. 8, 1780; graduated at Yale College in 1797; engaged in mercantile business in New Haven; was for several years a member of the State legislature; was a Representative in Congress in 1819-21, 1823-25, and 1833-34; and was United States Senator in 1827-33. He resigned his seat in Congress in his last term on being elected governor of Connecticut. In 1844 he was a Presidential elector on the Clay and Frelinghuysen ticket. In 1829 he introduced a resolution in the Senate which was the occasion of the great debate between Robert Young Hayne, of South Carolina, and Daniel Webster, of Massachusetts. The resolution, which seemed a simple affair to elicit such a notable debate, was as follows: Resolved, that the committee on public lands be instructed to inquire and report the quantity of the public lands remaining unsold within each State and Territory, and whether it be expedient to limit, for a certain pe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forsyth, John 1780- (search)
Forsyth, John 1780- Diplomatist; born in Fredericksburg, Va., Oct. 22, 1780; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1799. His parents removed to Georgia when he was quite young, and there he studied law, and was admitted to its practice about 1801. He was attorney-general of the State in 1808; member of Congress from 1813 to 1818, and from 1823 to 1827; United States Senator, and governor of Georgia from 1827 to 1829. Mr. Forsyth was United States minister to Spain in 1819-22, and negotiated the treaty that gave Florida to the United States. He opposed nullification (q. v.) in South Carolina, favored Clay's compromise act of 1833, and was United States Secretary of State front 1835 till his death, which occurred Oct. 21, 1841. Clergyman; born in Newburg, N. Y.; graduated at Rutgers in 1829; studied theology in Edinburgh University; ordained in 1834; Professor of Biblical Literature in Newburg, 1836; of Latin in Princeton in 1847-53; later again in Newburg, and occupie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Freewill Baptists, (search)
Freewill Baptists, A division of Baptists founded by Benjamin Randall in New Durham, N. H., in 1780. They gradually extended beyond New England into the West, but made no advance in the South, owing to their strong anti-slavery opinions. The doctrine and practice of the Freewill Baptists are embodied in a Treatise written in 1832. The chapters, twenty-one in all, declare that man can be rescued from his fallen state and made a child of God by redemption and regeneration, which have been freely provided. The call of the Gospel is co-extensive with the atonement, to all men, so that salvation is equally possible to all. The truly regenerate are through infirmity and manifold temptations, in danger of falling, and ought therefore to watch and pray lest they make shipwreck of faith. They practise immersion, and hold that every Christian, whatever his belief regarding the mode of baptism, is eligible to partake of the Lord's Supper. In 1900 they reported 1,619 ministers, 1,486
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Freneau, Philip 1752- (search)
Freneau, Philip 1752- the Poet of the Revolution; born in New York City, Jan. 2, 1752; graduated at the College of New Jersey in 1771. He was of Huguenot descent, and evinced a talent for rhyming as early as the age of seventeen years, when he wrote a poetical History of the Prophet Jonah. He was in the West Indies during a part of the Revolutionary War, and while on a voyage in 1780 was captured by a British cruiser. After his release he wrote many patriotic songs, and was engaged in editorial duties, notably on the Democratic National gazette, of Philadelphia, the organ of Jefferson and his party. He continued to edit and publish newspapers. His productions contributed largely to animate his countrymen while struggling for independence. An edition of his Revolutionary poems, with a memoir and notes, by Evert A. Duyckinck, was published in New York in 1865. His poetry was highly commended by Scotch and English literary critics. He died near Freehold, N. J., Dec. 18, 1832
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