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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1803 AD or search for 1803 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Weir, Robert Walter 1803-1889 (search)
Weir, Robert Walter 1803-1889 Painter; born in New Rochelle, N. Y., June 18, 1803; studied art in Italy three years, and, returning home in 1827, opened a studio in New York City. From 1830 to 1834 he was Professor of Perspective in the National Academy of Design; in the latter year was appointed instructor in drawing in the United States Military Academy; and held that post and performed its duties with success for a little more than forty years. Professor Weir's paintings are not numerous, but are highly valued for the truthfulness and the delicacy of sentiment which they all exhibit. Among the most noted of his pictures are the Embarkation of the Pilgrims, painted for the rotunda of the Capitol at Washington; The Atiquary introducing Lovel to his Womankind; Red Jacket; Columbus before the council at Salamanca; The Landing of Hendric Hudson; The Greek girl, Rebecca; Poestum by Moonlight; The presentation in the Temple; The dying Greek; The taking of the veil; and The journey
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Weld, Theodore Dwight 1803-1895 (search)
Weld, Theodore Dwight 1803-1895 Reformer; born in Hampton, Conn., Nov. 23, 1803; received a good education; was an abolitionist lecturer in 1833-36; became editor of the books and pamphlets of the American Anti-slavery Society in the latter year. In 1854 he founded a school for both white and negro children at Eagleswood, N. J. His publications include The power of Congress over the District of Columbia; The Bible against slavery; American slavery as it is, or the testimony of a thousand witnesses (said to have suggested the writing of Uncle Tom's cabin to Harriet Beecher Stowe); and Slavery and the internal slave-trade in the United States. He died in Hyde Park, Mass., Feb. 3, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), White, Anthony Walton 1750-1803 (search)
White, Anthony Walton 1750-1803 Military officer; born in New Brunswick, N. J., July 7, 1750; was appointed lieutenantcolonel of the 3d New Jersey Regiment in February, 1776, and was in command of cavalry in South Carolina in 1780. He and most of his command were captured at Lanneau's Ferry in May of that year. Colonel White was greatly esteemed by Washington, who in 1798 chose him as one of the brigadier-generals of the provisional army. He died in New Brunswick, N. J., Feb. 10, 1803.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Winslow, Joseph 1746- (search)
Winslow, Joseph 1746- Military officer; born in Virginia in 1746; joined a company of rangers in 1760; was twice wounded by Indians in battle; and in 1766 removed to North Carolina. When the Revolution began he was appointed a major, and had frequent encounters with Tories. In the battle at King's Mountain he commanded the right wing, and was voted a sword by North Carolina for his gallantry. He made a treaty with the Cherokees in 1777, served in the legislature of North Carolina, and was member of Congress from 1793 to 1795, and again in 1803. He died near Germantown, N. C., in 1814.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wissler, Jacques 1803-1887 (search)
Wissler, Jacques 1803-1887 Engraver; born in Strasburg, Germany, in 1803; was educated in Paris, France; came to the United States in 1849; and was employed by a lithographic firm. He was sent to Richmond. Va., by the firm before the Civil War broke out, and after the firing on Fort Sumter he was detained by the Confederates and employed to engrave the paper currency and bonds of the Confederacy. After the war he removed to Macon, Miss., and then to Camden, N. J., where he also engaged i1803; was educated in Paris, France; came to the United States in 1849; and was employed by a lithographic firm. He was sent to Richmond. Va., by the firm before the Civil War broke out, and after the firing on Fort Sumter he was detained by the Confederates and employed to engrave the paper currency and bonds of the Confederacy. After the war he removed to Macon, Miss., and then to Camden, N. J., where he also engaged in engraving. He was also a portrait artist in crayon and oil. He died in Camden, N. J., Nov. 25, 1887.
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