Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1803 AD or search for 1803 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Field, Richard Stockton 1803-1870 (search)
Field, Richard Stockton 1803-1870 Statesman; born in White Hill, N. J., Dec. 31, 1803; a grandson of Richard Stockton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence; graduated at Princeton in 1821, and admitted to the bar in 1825. In 1862 he was appointed to the United States Senate for the unexpired term of John R. Thompson; and in 1863 became district judge of the United States Court for the District of New Jersey. For many years Judge Field was president of the New Jersey Historical Society. He was the author of The Provincial courts of New Jersey; The Constitution not a compact between sovereign States; An Oration on the life and character of Abraham Lincoln, etc. He died in Princeton, N. J., May 25, 1870.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Florida, (search)
utionary War the trade of the Southern colonies was seriously interfered with by pirates fitted out in Florida, and the British incited the Indians in that region to make war on the Americans. The Spaniards invaded west Florida, and captured the garrison at Baton Rouge, in 1779; and in May, 1781, they seized Pensacola. By the treaty of 1783, Florida was retroceded to Spain, and the western boundary was defined, when a greater part of the inhabitants emigrated to the United States. When, in 1803, Louisiana was ceded to the United States by France, it was declared to be ceded with the same extent that it had in the hands of Spain, and as it had been ceded by Spain to France. This gave the United States a claim to the country west of the Perdido River, and the government took possession of it in 1811. Some irritation ensued. In the war with Great Britain (1812), the Spanish authorities at Pensacola favored the English. An expedition against the Americans having been fitted out the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Galloway, Joseph -1803 (search)
Galloway, Joseph -1803 Loyalist; born near West River, Anne Arundel co., Md., about 1730; was a member of the Pennsylvania Assembly in 1764, and at one time speaker and, with Franklin, advocated a change of the government of Pennsylvania from the proprietary to the royal form. A member of the first Continental Congress, he was conservative in his views, yet his line of argument in his first debates tended towards political independence. He proposed a plan of colonial government, which was rejected. It contemplated a government with a president-general appointed by the King, and a grand council, chosen every three years by the colonial assemblies, who were to be authorized to act jointly with Parliament in the regulation of the affairs of the colonies. Parliament was to have superior authority, with a right to revise all acts of the grand council, which, in turn, was to have a negative in British statutes relating to the colonies. This plan was, at first, favorably considered
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gansevoort, Peter 1749-1812 (search)
Gansevoort, Peter 1749-1812 Military officer; born in Albany, N. Y., July 17, 1749; was appointed major of a New York regiment in July, 1775, and in August joined the army, under Montgomery, that Peter Gansevoort. invaded Canada. He rose to colonel the next year; and in April, 1777, he was put in command of Fort Schuyler (see Stanwix, Fort), which he gallantly defended against the British and Indians in August. He most effectually co-operated with Sullivan in his campaign in 1779 and afterwards in the Mohawk region. In 1781 he received from the legislature of New York the commission of brigadiergeneral. General Gansevoort filled civil offices, particularly that of commissioner for Indian affairs, with great fidelity. In 1803 he was made military agent and brigadier-general in the regular army. He died in Albany, N. Y., July 2, 1812.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Giles, William branch 1762-1830 (search)
Giles, William branch 1762-1830 Legislator; born in Amelia county, Va., Aug. 12, 1762; was a member of Congress in 1791-1803, with the exception of two years. Originally a Federalist he soon affiliated with the Democrats; attacked Alexander Hamilton, Secretary of the Treasury, accusing him of corruption; he also opposed the ratification of the treaty with Great Britain in 1796, and opposed the proposed war with France in 1798. He was appointed United States Senator in 1804, and was subsequently elected, serving until March 3, 1815, when he resigned; governor of Virginia in 1826-30, resigning to take part in the Constitutional Convention. He died in Albemarle county, Va., Dec. 4, 1830.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hammond, Samuel 1757-1842 (search)
Hammond, Samuel 1757-1842 Military officer; born in Richmond county, Va., Sept. 21, 1757; participated in Dunmore's expedition; served throughout the Revolutionary War; settled in Savannah; was elected to Congress in 1803; appointed commandant of upper Louisiana in 1805, and held the office until 1824, when he resigned. He died in Augusta, Ga., Sept. 11, 1842.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hampton, Wade 1754-1835 (search)
Hampton, Wade 1754-1835 Military officer: born in South Carolina in 1754; was distinguished as a partisan officer under Sumter and Marion in the Revolution; and was twice a member of Congress—from 1795 to 1797, and from 1803 to 1805. In October, 1808, he was commissioned a colonel in the United States army; in 1809 brigadier-general, and March 2, 1813, major-general. Imperious and overbearing in his nature and deportment, he was constantly quarrelling with his subordinates. He was superseded by Wilkinson in command at New Orleans when the war broke out in 1812, and was put in command of the Army of the North, with headquarters on the borders of Lake Champlain. In that post he gained no honors, and his career there was chiefly marked by disobedience to the orders of his superiors. In April, 1814, he resigned his commission, and left the army. He was an extensive land and slave owner in South Carolina and Louisiana, and passed there a large portion of his later years. He d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Haraden, Jonathan 1745-1803 (search)
Haraden, Jonathan 1745-1803 Naval officer: born in Gloucester, Mass.. in 1745. At the beginning of the Revolutionary War he entered the navy: later was made captain and placed in command of the Pickering. He captured a British privateer in a night attack in the Bay of Biscay, and defeated another one, of 140 men and forty-two guns. Subsequently he took three armed vessels one after another. It is said that during the war he captured almost 1,000 cannon. He was himself captured with alvolutionary War he entered the navy: later was made captain and placed in command of the Pickering. He captured a British privateer in a night attack in the Bay of Biscay, and defeated another one, of 140 men and forty-two guns. Subsequently he took three armed vessels one after another. It is said that during the war he captured almost 1,000 cannon. He was himself captured with all his ships by Rodney, the English commander in the West Indies, in 1781. He died in Salem, Mass. Nov.26, 1803.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harmony Society. (search)
Harmony Society. A communistic society settled at Economy, near Pittsburg. George Rapp, the head of the society, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, October, 1757; died at Economy in 1847. Rapp and a few of his adherents sailed for America in 1803, and began several settlements in Maryland and Pennsylvania. In 1814 they removed to Posey county, Ind., selling their old home for $100,000, which was much below its value. In 1824 they sold the town of Harmony and 20,000 acres of land to Robert Owen for $150,000, and returned to Pennsylvania, settling at Economy. Originally each family retained its property, but in the year 1807 they established a community of goods and adopted celibacy. As the society does not seek new members, it is rapidly approaching extinction, and great curiosity is felt by their neighbors in Pittsburg as to the disposition of the large and valuable property.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hart, Albert Bushnell 1854- (search)
he, but the prospect of getting good land? Into the valley penetrated also Daniel Boone in 1769. A discoverer of the Mississippi. My wife and daughter, said he, being the first white women that ever stood on the banks of the Kentucke River. In 1803 to 1806, across the Mississippi Valley, all the way from Washington to the farthest wall of the Rocky Mountains, passed Lewis and Clark, first of white men to find the road from the waters of the Mississippi to the waters of the Columbia. On Auggs of the Chicago Fair while in construction came away overwhelmed and silent. At last he lifted up his voice, No wonder these Chicago people don't believe in a God, when they can do such things as these for themselves. When the Federalists in 1803 protested against the annexation of Louisiana, they were wise in their day and generation, for they were right in expecting that eventually the supremacy of the Atlantic coast States would disappear. In the Presidential election of 1828, the Stat
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