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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1821 AD or search for 1821 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stockton, Robert field 1795-1866 (search)
Stockton, Robert field 1795-1866 Naval officer; born in Princeton, N. J., Aug. 20, 1795; grandson of Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence; entered the navy as midshipman in 1811; was conspicuous in several of the battles of the War of 1812-15; became captain in 1838, and resigned in May, 1850. In the Mediterranean and on the coast of Africa he was active and efficient—against the Algerine pirates in the first instance, and the slavers in the second—and in 1821 he made treaties with African chiefs by which was obtained the territory of Liberia (see Colonization Society, American). He also broke up the nests of many West India pirates. He was among the foremost in advocating steam-vessels for the navy, and the Princeton, built after his plan, in 1844, was the pioneer. In 1845 he was sent to the Pacific with 1,500 men, including 600 sailors, in a small squadron, and in a few months he was chiefly instrumental in conquering California and forming a provisio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stone, William Leete 1792-1844 (search)
Stone, William Leete 1792-1844 Historian; born in New Paltz, N. Y., April 20, 1792; learned the printer's trade and engaged in journalism, and in 1821 succeeded to the editorship of the New York Commercial Advertiser, of which he was a proprietor till 1844. He was the author of History Of the Great Albany constitutional convention of 1821; Narrative of the Grand Erie Canal celebration; Border wars of the American Revolution, etc. He died in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Aug. 15, 1844. Author; born in New York City, April 4, 1835; son of the preceding; graduated at Brown University in 1858 and at the Albany Law School in 1859; practised in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., in 1860-63; later engaged in journalism. He is the author of The life and times of Sir William Johnson, Bart.; Revolutionary letters; Burgoyne's campaign and St. Leger's expedition; Life and military journals of Major-General Riedesel; History of New York City; Life and writings of Col. William L. Stone; The Saratoga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Storrs, Richard Salter 1821- (search)
Storrs, Richard Salter 1821- Clergyman; born in Braintree, Mass., Aug. 21, 1821; graduated at Amherst College in 1839 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1845, and in the same year was ordained in the Congregational Church; was pastor of the Church of the Pilgrims in Brooklyn from 1846 till his death, Aug. 5, 1900. He was one of the Independent in 1848— 61, and became widely known as a writer and pulpit orator of rare ability. His publications include An Oration commemorative of President Lincoln; Early American spirit and the Genesis of it; Declaration of Independence and the effects of it; The broader range and outlook of the modern College training; and many works of a religious characte
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Strain, Isaac G. 1821-1857 (search)
Strain, Isaac G. 1821-1857 Naval officer; born in Roxbury, Pa., March 4, 1821. While yet a midshipman (1845), he led a small party to explore the interior of Brazil, and in 1848 explored the peninsula of California. In 1849 he crossed South America from Valparaiso to Buenos Ayres, and wrote an account of the journey, entitled The Cordillera and Pampa, Mountain and plain: sketches of a journey in Chile and the Argentine provinces. In 1850 he was assigned to the Mexican boundary commission, and afterwards (1854) led a famous expedition across the Isthmus of Darien, for an account of which see Harper's magazine, 1856-57. In 1856, in the steamer Arctic, Lieutenant Strain ascertained by soundings the practicability of laying an ocean telegraphic cable between America and Europe. He died in Aspinwall, Colombia, May 14, 1857.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sully, Alfred 1821- (search)
Sully, Alfred 1821- Military officer; born in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1821; son of Thomas Sully, the emigrant painter; graduated at West Point in 1841; served in the Seminole War, and in the war against Mexico. He was colonel of the 3d Minnesota Regiment early in 1862, and in the Peninsular campaign commanded a brigade. He was also in the principal battles of the Army of the Potomac in Maryland and Virginia until the close of that year, and in the battle of Chancellorsville. He was sent t1821; son of Thomas Sully, the emigrant painter; graduated at West Point in 1841; served in the Seminole War, and in the war against Mexico. He was colonel of the 3d Minnesota Regiment early in 1862, and in the Peninsular campaign commanded a brigade. He was also in the principal battles of the Army of the Potomac in Maryland and Virginia until the close of that year, and in the battle of Chancellorsville. He was sent to Dakota Territory in 1863 to keep the Indians in subjection, where he was successful, and served in the Northeast until his death in Fort Vancouver, Washington Territory, April 17, 1879.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Summerfield, John 1798-1825 (search)
Summerfield, John 1798-1825 Clergyman; born in Preston, England, Jan. 31, 1798; was educated at a Moravian school; came to New York in 1821, and was admitted to the Methodist conference of that State. He preached in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington in 1822, his eloquence arousing enthusiasm. He went to France in 1822, and returned to the United States in 1824 and preached in the large cities. He was the founder of the American Tract Society. He died in New York City, June 13, 1825. Sumner, Charles
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Taylor, William 1821- (search)
Taylor, William 1821- Clergyman; born in Rockbridge county, Va., May 2, 1821; was educated in Lexington, Va.; entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1842; went to California as a missionary in 1849; spent several months in evangelistic work in the Englishspeaking countries of the world; and was made missionary bishop of Africa in 1884. He organized many self-supporting churches in India, and was author of Seven years Street preaching in San Francisco; California life illustrated, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Texas, (search)
n, and many skirmishes and battles occurred, chiefly by invasions of Americans. In conflicts in 1813 the Spanish lost about 1,000 men; and in a conflict the same year, a force of about 2,500 Americans and revolted Mexicans was nearly destroyed. Only about 100 escaped. The Spaniards murdered 700 of the peaceable inhabitants of San Antonio. After the close of the War of 1812-15 Lafitte made Galveston Island his headquarters, established there a town named Campeachy, and remained there until 1821, when the settlement was broken up by United States forces. In 1819 the Sabine was established as the eastern boundary of Texas, but dissatisfaction caused disturbances to continue, and the territory was almost deserted. In 1820 Moses Austin, then living in Missouri, received from the Spanish authorities of Mexico a grant of land in Texas, and dying, his son, Stephen F., received a confirmation of the grant in 1823. Emigrants from the United States flocked into Texas. A thousand familie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Thompson, Elizabeth 1821-1899 (search)
Thompson, Elizabeth 1821-1899 Philanthropist; born in Lyndon, Vt., Feb. 21, 1821; was the daughter of Samuel Rowell, a farmer, and at the age of nine went out to service. Her education was chiefly self-acquired. While on a visit to Boston in 1843 her remarkable beauty so attracted the attention of Thomas Thompson, a millionaire, that they were married within a year. At Mr. Thompson's death the entire income of his immense estate was left to her. She gave large sums of money to the cause of temperance and charity; provided $10,000 for a thorough investigation of yellow fever in the South; founded the town of Longmont, at the foot of the Rocky Mountains, and gave 640 acres of land and $300 to each colonist there. She contributed largely to the purchase of the Vassar College telescope; purchased and presented to Congress Francis B. Carpenter's painting of the Signing of the emancipation proclamation by President Lincoln in the presence of his cabinet, and for this was granted th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trimble, Allen 1783-1870 (search)
Trimble, Allen 1783-1870 Statesman; born in Augusta county, Va., Nov. 24, 1783; removed to Lexington, Ky., in 1784; and later settled in Highland county, O., where he was clerk of the courts and recorder in 1809-16; was in command of a mounted regiment under Gen. William Henry Harrison in 1812-13; served in both branches of the State legislature in 1816-26; was acting governor of Ohio in 1821-22; governor in 1826-30; and president of the first State board of agriculture in 1846-48. He died in Hillsboro, O., Feb. 2, 1870.
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