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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1821 AD or search for 1821 AD in all documents.

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eventeenth in the roll of States......Nov. 29, 1802 St. Clair deposed as governor by Jefferson......December, 1802 State legislature meets at Chillicothe, the capital......March 1, 1803 Ohio University (non-sectarian) opened at Athens......1804 [This university was founded in 1802 by the territorial legislature, and endowed by Congress with two townships, or 46,000 acres of land. In 1804 the act was confirmed by the State legislature. In 1810 a grammar school was opened, and in 1821 a college was organized.] Aaron Burr's expedition to Southwestern Territory......1805 Portsmouth, Scioto county, settled.1805 Indians cede to the United States the tract known as the Connecticut Reserve; treaty concluded at Fort Industry......July 4, 1805 State legislature orders the seizure of the boats building on the Muskingum for the Aaron Burr expedition ......Dec. 2, 1806 State capital removed from Chillicothe to Zanesville......1810 Population of the State, 230,760...
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennsylvania, (search)
ch the United States takes one-fifth......April 10, 1816 Anthracite coal begins to come into use; 365 tons shipped to Philadelphia are disposed of with difficulty......1820 Number of tons of anthracite coal received in Philadelphia, 1,073 in 1821; 2,440 tons in......1822 Lafayette visits the United States; received at Philadelphia with distinguished honors......September, 1824 American Sunday-school Union founded at Philadelphia......1824 Monument erected on the site of the treatyion students opens at Philadelphia under the auspices of the American Society......July 5, 1893 One million dollars for the erection of an art gallery bequeathed by Mr. Drexel......July 20, 1893 Hon. Charles O'Neill, of Philadelphia, born in 1821, who had been a member of the United States House of Representatives for thirty years, styled Father of the House, dies......Nov. 25, 1893 George W. Childs dies at Philadelphia......Feb. 3, 1894 Coxey army, moving on Washington, reach Pittsb
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Upham, Charles Wentworth 1802-1875 (search)
Upham, Charles Wentworth 1802-1875 Author; born in St. John, New Brunswick, Canada, May 4, 1802; graduated at Harvard College in 1821, and at its Divinity School in 1824; left the ministry on account of bronchial trouble in 1844; was president of the Massachusetts Senate in 1857-58; and member of Congress in 1853-55. His publications include Lectures on witchcraft, comprising a history of the Salem delusion, 1692; Life of John C. Fremont; Memoir of Francis Peabody; Salem witchcraft and cotton Mather, a reply; Life of Sir Henry Vane, etc. He died in Salem, Mass., June 14, 1875.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Buren, Martin 1782-1862 (search)
e was appointed surrogate of Columbia county, and was sent to the State Senate in 1812. From 1815 to 1819 he was attorney-general of the State of New York; and was again Senator in 1816, holding both offices at the same time. He began a new organization of the Democratic party in 1818, and became the leader of a body of politicians known as the Albany regency (q. v.). It held the political control of the State for nearly twenty years. Mr. Van Buren was elected to the United States Senate in 1821, and was also in the convention that revised the State constitution. In the latter body he was favorable to the extension of the elective franchise, but not of universal suffrage. He opposed a proposition to deprive colored people of the elective franchise, but voted in favor of requiring of them a freehold qualification of $250. He was again elected United States Senator in 1827; governor of New York in 1828; entered Jackson's cabinet as Secretary of State in March, 1829; but resigned in 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Van Rensselaer, Stephen 1765-1839 (search)
-15 broke out was chief of the New York State militia. In 1819 he was elected a regent of the State University, and afterwards its chancellor. In 1820 he was president of the State agricultural board, a member of the constitutional convention in 1821, and of Congress from 1823 to 1829. At his expense, and under his direction, a geological survey of New York was made in 1821-23. In 1824 he established at Troy, N. Y., a scientific school for the instruction of teachers, which was incorporatedent of the State University, and afterwards its chancellor. In 1820 he was president of the State agricultural board, a member of the constitutional convention in 1821, and of Congress from 1823 to 1829. At his expense, and under his direction, a geological survey of New York was made in 1821-23. In 1824 he established at Troy, N. Y., a scientific school for the instruction of teachers, which was incorporated in 1826 as the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He died in Albany, Jan. 26, 1839.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vanderbilt, William Henry 1821-1885 (search)
Vanderbilt, William Henry 1821-1885 Capitalist; born in New Brunswick, N. J., May 8, 1821; son of Cornelius Vanderbilt; educated at Columbia Grammar School; settled in New Dorp, Staten Island, and became the manager of the Staten Island Railroad. When his father engaged in railroad financiering at the age of seventy (1864) William took charge as vicepresident of the Harlem and Hudson River companies, and later of the New York Central. He received about $90,000,000 under the will of his father in 1877. His gifts to various objects include $200,000 to the endowment of Vanderbilt University and $100,000 for a theological department there; $500,000 for new buildings for the College of Physicians and Surgeons; $100,000 to the trainmen and laborers of the New York Central Railroad: $50,000 to the Church of St. Bartholomew; and $103,000 to bring from Egypt and erect in Central Park the obelisk which Khedive Ismail gave to the United States. He died in New York City, Dec. 8, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Vermont, (search)
Term. Stephen R. Bradley2d to 4th1791 to 1795 Moses Robinson2d to 4th1791 to 1796 Isaac Tichenor4th to 5th1796 to 1797 Elijah Paine4th to 7th1795 to 1801 Nathaniel Chipman5th to 8th1797 to 1803 Stephen R. Bradley7th to 13th1801 to 1813 Israel Smith8th to 10th1803 to 1807 Jonathan Robinson10th to 14th1807 to 1815 Dudley Chace13th to 15th1813 to 1817 Isaac Tichenor14th to 17th1815 to 1821 James Fisk15th1817 to 1818 William A. Palmer15th to 19th1818 to 1825 Horatio Seymour17th to 23d1821 to 1833 United States Senators— continued. Name.No. of Congress.Term. Dudley Chace19th to 22d1825 to 1831 Samuel Prentiss22d to 27th1831 to 1842 Benjamin Swift23d to 26th1833 to 1839 Samuel S. Phelps26th to 32d1839 to 1851 Samuel C. Crafts27th1842 to 1843 William Upham28th to 33d1843 to 1853 Samuel S. Phelps33d1853 to 1854 Solomon Foot32d to 39th1851 to 1866 Lawrence Brainerd33d1854 to 1855 Jacob Collamer34th to 39th1855 to 1865 George F. Edmunds39th to 52d1866 to 1891 Luk
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Verplanck, Gulian Crommelin 1786-1870 (search)
Verplanck, Gulian Crommelin 1786-1870 Author; born in New York City, Aug. 7, 1786; graduated at Columbia College in 1801; admitted to the bar and practised in New York City; member of the State legislature in 1820; Professor of the Evidence of Christianity in the Episcopal Theological Seminary, New York, in 1821-25; member of Congress in 1825-33; of the State Senate in 1838-41; and president of the New York board of emigration commissioners. He published Discourses and addresses on subjects of American history, art, and Literature, etc. He died in New York City, March 18, 1870. Verrazzano, Giovanni da
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wade, Benjamin Franklin -1878 (search)
Wade, Benjamin Franklin -1878 Statesman; born near Springfield, Mass., Oct. 27, 1800; removed to Ashtabula, O., in 1821; admitted to the bar in 1827; elected prosecuting attorney in 1835; State Senator in 1837; and was United States Senator in Benjamin Franklin Wade. 1851-69. He was a conspicuous antislavery leader, opposed the Kansas-Nebraska bill; favored the homestead bill and the confiscation of property in slaves. He was acting Vice-President of the United States under President Johnson; and one of the commissioners to Santo Domingo in 1871. He died in Jefferson, O., March 2, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walker, James Bradford Richmond 1821- (search)
Walker, James Bradford Richmond 1821- Clergyman; born in Taunton, Mass., April 15, 1821; graduated at Brown University in 1841 and at Andover Theological Seminary in 1846; was ordained pastor in the Congregational Church in Bucksport, Me., in 1847; held charges in Holyoke, Mass., in 1855-64; and in Hartford, Conn., in 1864-67. He then turned his attention to literature. His publications include Memorial of the walkers of the old Plymouth colony, and The genealogy of John Richmond. John Grimes Walker.
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