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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1821 AD or search for 1821 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wallace, William Harvey Lamb 1821-1862 (search)
Wallace, William Harvey Lamb 1821-1862 Military officer; born in Urbana, O., July 8, 1821; served in the war with Mexico, in Hardin's regiment; and was State's attorney for the ninth circuit of Illinois, in 1853. In May, 1861, he became colonel of the 11th Illinois Volunteers. He commanded a brigade in McClernand's division at the capture of Fort Donelson, and was made brigadier-general of volunteers. On the first day of the battle of Shiloh (q. v.) he was mortally wounded, and died in Savannah, Tenn., April 10, 1862.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Walworth, Reuben Hyde 1788-1867 (search)
Walworth, Reuben Hyde 1788-1867 Jurist; born in Bozrah, Conn., Oct. 26, 1788; admitted to the bar in 1809 and began practice in Plattsburg, N. Y. During the British invasion of Plattsburg, in September, 1814, he was aide to Gen. Benjamin Mooers, by whom he was assigned to view the naval fight from the shore and to report the resuits. He held a seat in Congress in 1821-23; was judge of the fourth judicial district of New York in 1823-28; and chancellor of New York State in 1828-48. In the latter year the court of chancery was abolished by the adoption of the new constitution. He published Rules and orders of the New York Court of Chancery, and Hyde genealogy (2 volumes). He died in Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Nov. 27, 1867. His son, Mansfield Tracy, born in Albany, N. Y., Dec. 3, 1830, graduated at Union College in 1849 and at the Harvard Law School in 1852; was admitted to the bar in 1855, but soon abandoned law and devoted himself to literature. He was the author of Life of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washburn, Emory 1800-1877 (search)
Washburn, Emory 1800-1877 Jurist; born in Leicester, Mass., Feb. 14, 1800; graduated at Williams College in 1817; admitted to the bar in 1821; practised in Leicester, Mass., in 1821-28; settled in Worcester in the latter year and was there prominent in his profession for about thirty years; judge of the court of common pleas in 1844-48; elected governor of Massachusetts in 1853 and 1854; Professor of Law at Harvard University in 1856-76. He was the author of Judicial history of Massachus1821-28; settled in Worcester in the latter year and was there prominent in his profession for about thirty years; judge of the court of common pleas in 1844-48; elected governor of Massachusetts in 1853 and 1854; Professor of Law at Harvard University in 1856-76. He was the author of Judicial history of Massachusetts; History of Leicester; Treatise on the American law of real property; Treatise on the American law of Easements and Servitudes, etc. He died in Cambridge, Mass., March 18, 1877.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, John Augustine 1821- (search)
Washington, John Augustine 1821- Military officer; born in Blakely, Jefferson co., Va., May 3, 1821; great-great-grandnephew of George Washington; graduated at the University of Virginia in 1840; served as aide-de-camp, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, on the staff of Gen. Robert E. Lee, at the beginning of the Civil War; and was killed in a skirmish near Rich Mountain, Va., Sept. 13, 1861.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Waterman, Thomas Whitney 1821-1898 (search)
Waterman, Thomas Whitney 1821-1898 Lawyer; born in Binghamton, N. Y., June 28, 1821; studied at Yale University; admitted to the bar in 1848; practised in New York City in 1848-70; removed to Binghamton in the latter year. He was the editor of New system of criminal procedure; Murray Hoffman's Chancery reports, etc., and author of Treatise on the Civil and criminal jurisdiction of Justices of the peace for the States of Wisconsin and Iowa: containing practical forms; Digest of the reported decisions of the Superior Court and of the Supreme Court of errors of the State of Connecticut, from the organization of said courts to the present time, etc. He died in Binghamton, N. Y., Dec. 7, 1898.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wayland, Francis 1796-1865 (search)
Wayland, Francis 1796-1865 Educator; born in New York City, March 11, 1796; graduated at Union College in 1813; studied medicine for three years; entered the Andover Theological Seminary in 1816; was instructor there for four years; ordained in the Baptist Church, and became pastor of the First Baptist church in Boston, Mass., in 1821; was professor in Union College in 1826; president of Brown University in 1827-55; pastor of the First Baptist church in Providence, R. I., in 1855; and author of Thoughts on the present collegiate system of the United States; Domestic slavery considered as a Spiritual institution, etc. He died in Providence, R. I., Sept. 30, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webster, Daniel 1782-1852 (search)
House, gave thirty-three votes, and only one against it. The four Southern States, with fifty members, gave thirty-two votes for it and seven against it. Again, in 1821—observe again, sir, the time—the law passed for the relief of the purchasers of the public lands. This was a measure of vital importance to the West, and more espmbers. These two are far the most important measures respecting the public lands which have been adopted within the last twenty years. They took place in 1820 and 1821. That is the time when. And as to the manner how, the gentleman already sees that it was by voting in solid column for the required relief. And, lastly, as to tot acquiesced in the tariff then supported by South Carolina. To some parts of it, especially, I felt and expressed great repugnance. I held the same opinions in 1821, at the meeting in Faneuil Hall, to which the gentleman has alluded. I said then, and say now, that, as an original question, the authority of Congress to exercis
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wheaton, Henry 1785-1848 (search)
Wheaton, Henry 1785-1848 Diplomatist; born in Providence, R. I., Nov. 27, 1785; graduated at Brown University in 1802; studied law abroad, and began its practice at Providence. In 1812 he removed to New York, where he edited the National advocate, in which the subject of neutral rights was discussed. From 1816 until 1827 he was reporter of the Supreme Court of the United States, and published 12 volumes of its decisions. In the New York constitutional convention of 1821 he was a prominent member, and was one of the commissioners to revise the statutes of the State of New York. From 1827 to 1835 he was charge d'affaires to Denmark; from 1835 to 1837 resident minister at Berlin; and from 1837 to 1846 minister plenipotentiary there. He returned to New York in 1847, and was made Professor of International Law in Harvard College, but died before the time appointed for his installation. Mr. Wheaton was a voluminous writer upon various subjects, and as a reporter he was unrivalled
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whitney, Anne 1821- (search)
Whitney, Anne 1821- Sculptor; born in Watertown, Mass., in September, 1821; received a private school education; wrote a number of poems which were collected in one volume; studied art in Europe for four years; and established herself in Boston in 1872. Among her works are statues of Samuel Adams, Lief Erikson, etc., and busts of Ethiopia, Roma, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wilkinson, John 1821- (search)
Wilkinson, John 1821- Naval officer; born in Norfolk, Va., Nov. 6, 1821; joined the navy in 1837; served on the Portsmouth in 1845-46; promoted master in June, 1850, and lieutenant in the following November. He resigned from the National service in 1861 and joined the Confederate navy as a lieutenant; was executive officer of the ram Louisiana, which was captured by Farragut in the spring of 1862, when New Orleans fell; was exchanged in the following August and appointed an agent to buy and load a vessel with war materials in England. He purchased the Giraffe, with which he ran the blockade at Wilmington, N. C. In 1864 he commanded the Chickamauga, with which he destroyed numerous merchant vessels, and in the following year commanded the blockade runner Chameleon, in which he sailed to Liverpool, where she was seized by the United States governemnt after the war. Wilkinson published The narrative of a blockade runner.
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