hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 6 6 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 6 6 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 5 5 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 5 5 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 5 5 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Edward H. Savage, author of Police Recollections; Or Boston by Daylight and Gas-Light ., Boston events: a brief mention and the date of more than 5,000 events that transpired in Boston from 1630 to 1880, covering a period of 250 years, together with other occurrences of interest, arranged in alphabetical order 5 5 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 5 5 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 883 results in 558 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...
manding general announces to the Army of the Gulf the sad event of the death of Brig.-Gen. Thomas Williams, commanding Second Brigade, in camp at Baton Rouge. The victorious achievement — the repulse of the division of Major-General Breckinridge by the troops led by General Williams, and the destruction of the mail-clad Arkansas by Captain Porter, of the navy — is made sorrowful by the fall of our brave, gallant, and successful fellow soldier. General Williams graduated at West Point in 1837; at once joined the Fourth Artillery in Florida, where he served with distinction; was thrice brevetted for gallant and meritorious services in Mexico as a member of General Scott's staff. His life was that of a soldier, devoted to his country's service. His country mourns in sympathy with his wife and children, now that country's care and precious charge. We, his companions in arms, who had learned to love him, weep the true friend, the gallant gentleman, the brave soldier, the accompli
g General announces to the Army of the Gulf the sad event of the death of Brigadier-General Thomas Williams, commanding Second brigade, in camp, at Baton Rouge. The victorious achievement — the repulse of the division of Major-General Breckinridge by the troops led by General Williams, and the destruction of the mail-clad Arkansas by Captain Porter of the Navy — is made sorrowful by the fall of our brave, gallant and successful fellow-soldier. General Williams graduated at West-Point in 1837; at once joined the Fourth artillery, in Florida, where he served with distinction; was thrice breveted for gallant and meritorious serv ices in Mexico, as a member of General Scott's staff. His life was that of a soldier devoted to his country's service. His country mourns in sympathy with his wife and children, now that country's care and precious charge. We, his companions in arms, who had learned to love him, weep the true friend, the gallant gentleman, the brave soldier, the accompl
Jeduthan Richardson1821. Nathan Adams1822. Turell Tufts1823. Joseph Swan1826. Dudley Hall1827. Turell Tufts1828. John Howe1829. John B. Fitch1830. John King1831. John Symmes, jun1832. Thomas R. Peck1834. Galen James1836. James O. Curtis1837. Galen James1838. Lewis Richardson1839. Thomas R. Peck1840. Alexander Gregg1841. Timothy Cotting1844. Alexander Gregg1845. Henry Withington1847. Peter C. Hall1849. James O. Curtis1850. Peter C. Hall1853. Benjamin H. Samson1855. NamPatten1778. Richard Hall1786. Jonathan Porter1790. Isaac Warren1793. Samuel Buel1794. John Bishop1798. Joseph P. Hall1804. Joseph Manning1808. William Rogers1823. Henry Porter1825. Turell Tufts1827. Timothy Cotting1836. George W. Porter1837. Names of the town-clerks. J. Wade1674. Stephen Willis1675. John Bradstreet1701. Stephen Willis1708. Thomas Tufts1718. William Willis1719. Benjamin Willis1721. William Willis1726. Ebenezer Brooks, jun1728. Benjamin Willis1730.
mon Tufts1772. Benjamin Hall1775. Thomas Brooks1776. T. Brooks, (under the Constitution)1780. Thomas Brooks1781. Aaron Hall1782. John Brooks1785. James Wyman1787. Thomas Brooks1788. Ebenezer Hall1789. Nathaniel Hall1800. Timothy Bigelow1808. Dudley Hall1813. Abner Bartlett1815. Turell Tufts1824. Thatcher Magoun1825. John B. Fitch1826. John Sparrell1831. Thomas R. Peck1833. Frederick A. Kendall1834. Timothy Cotting1834. John King1835. James O. Curtis1836. George W. Porter1837. Lewis Richardson1838. Leonard Bucknam1838. Alexander Gregg1840. Thatcher R. Raymond1843. Gorham Brooks1846. Joseph P. Hall1847. Thatcher R. Raymond1850. Joseph P. Hall1851. James M. Usher1852. Joseph P. Hall1853. Jonathan Oldham1854. Justices of the Peace in Medford. (from Massachusetts Records.) Thomas BrooksMar. 27, 1781. Benjamin HallMar. 27, 1781. Stephen Hall, 3dMar. 27, 1781. Edward BrooksMar. 27, 1781. Timothy FitchSept. 26, 1783. John BrooksJan. 28, 1785.
ticed in this history? The writer of this has maintained, that, under the circumstances, it is not necessary; but he has at last been syllogized into the belief, that what was publicly done by a son of Medford towards the education-revival of 1835-7 belongs to the history of the town, and cannot be omitted without violating the rule followed in all other cases in town histories. Silenced rather than convinced, he yields to the wishes of those he has no right to disregard; and, omitting all deared in Sicily; but I have never read that the Sicilians mourned for the appearance of that foreign blessing among them. Bespeaking your patient forbearance under this epistolary infliction, I am, as ever, yours, truly, Charles Brooks. In 1837, voted to continue the primary schools through the year. To show how promptly our town took the form and pressure of the times, we need only state the appropriations annually made for the support of the schools; and, beginning with 1832, they s
ears, in building proper schoolhouses. The following table records the facts:-- When Built.location.building-Committee.master-workmen.cost. 1835.Primary, Union Street.Horatio A. Smith, Galen James, and Milton James.Caldwell & Wyatt.$1040.00. 1837.Primary, Park Street.Galen James, James W. Brooks, James O. Curtis, & Saml. Joyce.Oakman Joyce and John Sables.3454.64. 1840.High & Grammar, High Street.Oakman Joyce, D. Lawrence, and James O. Curtis.Charles Caldwell & Wm. B. Thomas.7568.77. 185and so favorably did the inhabitants view it, that they voted to purchase as soon as a proper one could be found. No purchase was made; and in 1832 a committee is directed to sell the poorhouse, if they think it advisable. It is not done; and in 1837 the town again called up the subject, and appointed a committee to examine lands and close the bargain. But no farm was purchased. In 1849, the town bought a large lot of ten and a half acres in West Medford, on Purchase Street, for a cemetery
because it is so cut into long plank as to make less work to the builder. The materials for building at Medford may all be procured at a rate which will allow as favorable terms as at any other place, especially when the comparative rent of yards is included. If the water in the river had been deep enough for the large ships of the present day, the yards above the bridge would never have been abandoned. The increase of size in our Medford ships has been gradual. The Columbiana, built in 1837, was the first of six hundred tons; and the Ocean express, the first of two thousand tons. The ship Shooting Star was the first clipper built here; and the George Peabody, the first vessel that passed the bridges on Mystic River, after the draws had been widened according to the direction of the Legislature. The Rev. A. R. Baker preached a sermon on ship-building, in 1846, to which is appended a register of vessels built in Medford. He says, I have enrolled them so as to present the year
xpenses in 1815, when they say, The revenue of the town has, fortunately, been more than sufficient to meet its expenditures. The males in the alms-house were put to mending our highways. The keeper of the house and the surveyor directed their labors; and it took them most. of their time to accomplish the whole work. In 1830, they did three hundred and ninety-one days labor on the public roads; and the cost of each pauper's support then was seventy-eight and one-half cents per week. In 1837, a proposition was made to purchase some land attached to that then owned by the town near the alms-house. After mature deliberation, the committee to whom it was referred reported against the measure. Since the erection of the new house in 1852, the town's poor have not increased, though every good care is taken of them which their circumstances require. The town of Medford has always selected some of its best citizens to oversee and regulate the management of the poor; and they have pe
ywood, of Concord, Mass., in 1808, who d. 1820, leaving four sons, one being Humphrey B. (4); 2d, m. Sarah L. Symmes, dau. of Nathan Wait, Esq., of Medford, who d. 1837.  3-5Henry Wait, b. 1822.  6George, b. 1824.   3d, he m. Elizabeth W. Butters, 1849. 3-4HUMPHREY Barrett Howe b. 1815; m. Susan Esther Withington in 1852. 3-5njamin, b. 1833; d. young. 110-174BERNARD Tufts m. Lucinda Tufts (No. 203), and had--  174-234Joseph Bernard, lives in Billerica.  235Edmund.  236Alfred, b. c. 1837. 110-175ASA Tufts m. Mary Ann Tufts (No. 204), and had--  175-237Harriett, m. Mr. Holbrook.  238Mary Ann.  239Elizabeth.  240Caroline.  241Lucy.  242Mercy. was b. Mar. 19, 1826.   Louisa H., b. May 11, 1807.   Julia D., b. Feb. 28, 1809.    Sarah P. (Fanny Fern) b. July 9, 1811; m.Charles H. Eldridge, May 4, 1837.    Mary P., b. Nov. 28, 1813; m.Joseph Jenkins, Aug., 1831.   Edward P., b. July 23, 1816; d., unm., Mar. 22, 1853.    Richard Storr
e placed in command of the Confederate left, Polk retaining the right. Not all of Longstreet's troops arrived in time for the battle, but Bragg's force has been estimated at fifty-one to seventy-one thousand strong. Thomas was given command of the Union left, with McCook at his right, while Crittenden's forces occupied the center, but to the rear of both Thomas and McCook. Thomas had The Confederate leader at Chickamauga Major-General Braxton Bragg, C. S. A. Born, 1815; West Point, 1837; Died, 1876. Bragg's name before 1861 was perhaps better known in military annals than that of any other Southern leader because of his brilliant record in the Mexican War. In the Civil War he distinguished himself first at Shiloh and by meritorious services thereafter. But his delays rendered him scarcely a match for Rosecrans, to say nothing of Grant and Sherman. Flanked out of two strong positions, he missed the opportunity presented by Rosecrans' widely separated forces and failed to c
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ...