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iting. Boston Evening Journal, Nov. 21, 1863, p. 4, col. 6 (and after). — Jan., 1864. Address to Legislature, treating, among other things, the hospital for inva 22, 1861, p. 2, col. 7. — Builder of steam war vessel Meteor; trial trip, Jan., 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 333. — Correspondence with Sec. Cameroned River region, brings news of events at Madisonville and Fort Jackson, La., Jan., 1864. Boston Evening Journal, Feb. 10, 1864, p. 4, col. 3. Halltown, Va. Eng —For invalid soldiers. Address to the Legislature by Gov. John A. Andrew, Jan., 1864. Boston Evening Journal, Jan. 8, 1864, p. 1, cols. 1-8; p. 2, cols. 1, 2. p and description of new government steamer, built in Boston by R. B. Forbes, Jan., 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, p. 333. Midnight, U. S. bark. Gallant acti New York Tribune. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 4, p. 398. — At Gettysburg, Jan., 1864; address to the Legislature, by Gov. John A. Andrew. Boston Evening Journa
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union, Commissioned officers. (search)
; 1st Lieut. Oct. 5, 1865. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865, as 1st Sergt. Prev. serv. Rufus V. Woods. En. Springfield, 24, s; tailor. Private Dec. 30, 1864; 1st Sergt. Feb. 10, 1865; 1st Lieut. Oct. 5, 1865. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865 as 1st Sergt. Benjamin Russell, Jr., Greenwood. Me., 31, s; farmer. Private Jan. 5, 1864; 1st Lieut. Oct. 5, 1865. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865 as 1st Sergt. Prior Ser. Zenas W. Clark, Pembroke, Me., 22, s; farmer. Private Oct, 19, 1862; Corp. July 12. 1862; Sergt. Jan. 1864. Re-en. Feb. 19, 1864; 1st Lieut. Oct 5, 1865. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865 as Sergt. Robert E. Mason, New York, 21, s; clerk. Private March 16, 1864; Sergt. June 1, 1865; 1st Lieut. Oct. 5, 1865. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865 as Sergt. Theodore C. Howe, Braintree, 18, s; laborer. Private Dec. 7. 1863; Q. M. Sergt. May 21, 1865; 1st. Lieut. Oct. 5, 1865. M. O. Sept. 28, 1865 as Q. M. Sergt. John M. W. Emery, Great Falls, N. H., 21, s; clerk. Private March 30, 1864; Sergt. July 28. 1865; 1
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
dersonville prison in Georgia, Elmira prison and Johnson's island, Fort Delaware and the prison ships were the inevitable results of the cessation of the exchanges of prisoners usual in wars. It became plain to the Confederate government in January, 1864, that it would be compelled to guard and support for an indefinitely prolonged time the increasing numbers of prisoners taken by its armies in battle, and in view of its diminishing resources, as well as its inability to certainly hold any pove released within ten days every Northern soldier in the Confederate prisons, but at the same time have left a large number of Southern soldiers in Northern prisons because the excess was then on the Federal side, was not even noticed. In January, 1864, and even before that date it was feared by the Confederate authorities that prisoners of war on both sides would be held in captivity without the benefits of exchange. Colonel Ould, the Confederate agent of exchange, therefore wrote, Januar
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
umberland sunk, demonstrating the fightipg qualities of his ship, under his skillful command. Congress being in session at the time, he was thanked by resolution and a bill was soon passed creating the grade of admiral in the navy, to which Buchanan was nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate, August 21, 1862. Later in that year he was assigned to the important post of commander of the naval force at Mobile. The operations of the Federal fleet against that port began in January, 1864, and from that date he was busily engaged in co-operation with Gen. Dabney H. Maury in devising means to hold this stronghold, struggling against a pitiful deficiency of everything but the valor of the men at their command. He had previously built and equipped the ram Tennessee, a powerful iron-clad resembling the Virginia in general appearance. In command of this vessel and three gunboats, in all twenty-two guns, he engaged with characteristic intrepidity the Federal fleet commanded b
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
shed officer in the high position he has filled, the commanding general tenders him his cordial thanks and wishes him all success and happiness in his future career. The general and the army will long feel the sacrifice made in sparing the services of one so distinguished for capacity, professional acquirements and urbanity. In November, now being on duty in the department of Mississippi and East Louisiana, he was assigned to the command of the brigades lately under General Hebert. In January, 1864, after serving for a time with Gen. Leonidas Polk, who recommended his promotion to majorgen-eral, he returned to Johnston, then in command of the army of Tennessee, and being appointed chief-of-staff, served in that capacity throughout the famous campaign against Sherman from Dalton to Atlanta. After the removal of Johnston he was relieved from his staff duties at his own request, but he continued to participate in the Confederate operations, and on April 20, 1865, after the surrender
ed and captured. The whole command then occupied Petersburg, the garrison fleeing, and gathered some commissary stores and 13,000 cartridges, after which Gilmor and McNeill were sent out after cattle, while Rosser destroyed the railroad and other bridges at the mouth of Patterson's creek. The enemy then appearing in force, Early withdrew, bringing out 50 wagons and teams, 1,200 cattle, 500 sheep and 78 prisoners, again cheering the hearts of the soldiers in the Shenandoah valley. In January, 1864, Colonel Ferguson, Sixteenth Virginia cavalry, came into Wayne county, with a large part of his regiment and the Eighth cavalry, and during the remainder of the year the region between the Guyandotte and Big Sandy was practically controlled by the Confederate soldiers. Under this protection, the Big Sandy river became a channel of trade with Northern merchants. Judge H. L. Samuels, who had been prevented from holding court in Wayne under the West Virginia State government, reported tha
tly related. The Federal artillery was supplied with ammunition in time to work havoc in the Confederate ranks—the shattered lines closed up and gained the summit of the ridge and planted the stars and bars in the Federal lines—and disappeared in a tornado of fire. Very few came back unhurt. In September, 1863, Pickett was assigned to command of the department of North Carolina, embracing Petersburg and Southern Virginia. He made a demonstration against New Bern in the latter part of January, 1864. In May he joined Lee on the North Anna, and from that time commanded his old division, Armistead's, Pickett's, Corse's and Kemper's brigades, now under Barton, Hunton, Corse and Terry, until the close of hostilities. On June 16th, Lee arrived at Drewry's bluff with Pickett's division, and witnessed the gallant recapture of the Confederate lines from Butler. He wrote to Longstreet: We tried very hard to keep Pickett's men from capturing the breastworks of the enemy, but could not do i
rted for duty. Jan. 4. Privates Jacob B. Sulham, Henry L. Ewell and Everett J. Wilson permanently transferred to this Battery for the purpose of reenlistment agreeable to Special Order No. 2 H dq'r s 3rd Army Corps. Francis Loham reported to quarters. Jan. 5. Privates Jacob B. Sulham, Henry I. Ewell, and Everett J. Wilson were re-enlisted by Lieut. Asa Smith for Tenth Mass. Battery for 3 years from Jan. 4, 1864. Mustered out and re-mustered into the U. S. Vols. service this 5th day Jan'y 1864. Jan. 6. Private John Ramsdell and Francis Loham reported for duty. Four horses unserviceable. Jan. 7. Corp'l John H. Stevens and Leroy E. Hunt reported to quarters. Privates Sulham, Ewell and Wilson, re-enlisted veteran volunteers, started on 35 days furlough. Jan. 8. Corp'l Stevens reported for duty. Jan. 9. Received this P. M. from Brig. General Devens as recruits privates Michael B. O'Neil, Wm. M. Bastable, James Kay, T. (P)? Hill, John Nesbit. Jan. 10. Private John
his command to hold the railroad cut from which the Federals had been ousted. In January following he was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to the command of Trimble's brigade, including the Sixth, Twenty-first, Fifty-fourth, Fifty-seventh North Carolina regiments and the First battalion. During the battle of Chancellorsville he fought at Fredericksburg, where he was wounded May 4th, so seriously as to prevent his participation in the Pennsylvania and Rappahannock campaigns. In January, 1864, he reported to General Pickett at Petersburg, where his brigade was sent, and forwarded to North Carolina. In the latter part of the month he organized the movement against New Bern from Kinston. At the head of one column he successfully surprised and captured the enemy's outposts, and defeated the troops which were thrown against him, but on account of the delay of the other column, was unable to reduce the post. On April 17th, in command of the Confederate forces, he attacked the F
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 17: (search)
solate ruin, a shapeless pile of shattered walls and casemates, showing here and there the guns disabled and half buried in splintered wrecks of carriages, its mounds of rubbish fairly reeking with the smoke and smell of powder, Fort Sumter under fire was transformed within a year into a powerful earthwork, impregnable to assault, and even supporting the other works at the entrance of Charleston harbor with six guns of the heaviest caliber. The shelling of Charleston continued during January, 1864, on one day 273 shells being thrown, and in the latter part of the month the fire on Sumter was renewed. On the 30th the flagstaff was shot down, and replaced by Private F. Schafer, of Lucas' battalion, who at the close of his work stood on the traverse amid a cloud of smoke and dust from bursting shell, waving his hat in triumph. Early in February, General Beauregard was advised of Gillmore's expedition in Florida, threatening the capital of that State, and he immediately began forw
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