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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
rough rain, sleet, snow, mud, swamps, gullies, creeks, rivers, frost, forest and bullets we rode, walked, ran, stumbled, plunged, swam, traded, scrambled, climbed, charged, retreated, fought, bled, fell, drowned, and froze. These brave and daring riders were not like the heroes of the charge at Balaklava, for nearly all of them lived to tell the story and receive a brand-new uniform as a present from the government for the inconvenience they had been subjected to. Again, on the 1st day of May, 1864, General Averill made another raid. His starting point was Charleston, and passing through Wyoming, Logan and Tazewell counties, on the 10th he arrived at Wytheville, when he again struck the railroad. John Morgan and his raiders were close after them. Averill was compelled to evade Morgan to accomplish his purpose, and he struck for Dublin. Most of the railroad between this point and Christiansburg he destroyed, but was side-tracked by our cavalry sent to intercept him. They whee
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
en the old man reached the cemetery he heard a groan and witnessed a resurrection. He fled to the prison in terror and the prisoner fled in another direction. Thereupon Major Beale appointed my friend, M. M. Conklin, on especial duty, one of his duties being to see that no prisoner was sent out of there dead, unless he was much dead. As most of our dead were captured in the Wilderness, I gave my friend Conklin a sketch of that terrible field of carnage. In seven days 50,000 men fell. May 1, 1864, General Lee issued two orders. First: Send all extra baggage to the rear; Second, cook up three days rations; both easily complied with, because we had little extra baggage; second, our three days rations consisted of three pones of cornbread. May 4th, General Grant crossed the Rapidan with 117,000 men, the flower of the Federal army. Confronting him in the Wilderness was General Lee, with 55,000 ill-clad and poorly fed Confederates. May 5th, General Grant charged us in the Wildern
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
en the old man reached the cemetery he heard a groan and witnessed a resurrection. He fled to the prison in terror and the prisoner fled in another direction. Thereupon Major Beale appointed my friend, M. M. Conklin, on especial duty, one of his duties being to see that no prisoner was sent out of there dead, unless he was much dead. As most of our dead were captured in the Wilderness, I gave my friend Conklin a sketch of that terrible field of carnage. In seven days 50,000 men fell. May 1, 1864, General Lee issued two orders. First: Send all extra baggage to the rear; Second, cook up three days rations; both easily complied with, because we had little extra baggage; second, our three days rations consisted of three pones of cornbread. May 4th, General Grant crossed the Rapidan with 117,000 men, the flower of the Federal army. Confronting him in the Wilderness was General Lee, with 55,000 ill-clad and poorly fed Confederates. May 5th, General Grant charged us in the Wildern
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the Battalion of the Georgia Military Institute Cadets (search)
tary Tactics and Engineering. Captain James S. Austin, Commandant of Cadets and Professor of English Literature. Captain Victor E. Manget, Professor of French. Captain John M. Richardson, Professor of Higher Mathematics. Captain Paul Eve, Professor of Mathematics and English Branches. Rev. John W. Baker, Chaplain of the Institute, and Professor of Belle Lettres. Dr. E. J. Setze, Physician and Surgeon G. M. I. Major Dobbs, Quartermaster and Commissary. About the first of May, 1864, orders were received for the battalion to prepare for active service. Equipments of army guns and accoutrements, knacksacks, haversacks and canteens were received and issued to the cadets. They were intensely interested in these preparatory events. The battalion was divided into two companies in the duties at the Institute, Company A and Company B, composed of boys 16 to 18 years of age, and in the same way they entered the army service. General Capers was placed in command as m
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909, Company E, 39th Massachusetts Infantry, in the Civil War.—(Iv.) (search)
Hale, Edward M., went out as second sergeant; on detached service, April 6, 1864; mustered out June 2, 1865; served in the Adjutant-General's Office, War Department, Washington, long after the War; last living in Passaic, N. J. Hafford, John, discharged June 20, 1863; died November 15, 1905. Hanley, John H., discharged August 12, 1863; died more than twenty years ago in Somerville. Herbon, William M., killed in battle August 18, 1864. Harlow, George R., promoted to corporal May 1, 1864; wounded May 10, 1864; wounded August 18, 1864 (lost an arm); discharged March 17, 1865; lives at Chattanooga, Hatch, George H., taken prisoner August 19, 1864; died in Salisbury prison February 1, 1865. Hills, George A., discharged January 29, 1863; lives in Springfield, Mass. Hagan, Patrick, discharged April 21, 1863; claimed to have served in the Crimean War; died many years ago. Horgan, Patrick, taken prisoner August 19, 1864; returned May 20, 1865; returned with the Comp
un Slighton, a free negro woman, emancipated since the year 1805, for permission to remain in this State, and reside in this city, was this day heard and rejected. A nolle prosequi was entered in the case of Wm. H. Fry for permitting a nuisance on his premises The applications of B. Lennace and Chas. Everett, for licenses to keep ordinaries in this city, were heard and rejected. Thomas Hugerton and C. Bales were granted licenses to keep ordinaries in this city till the 1st day of May, 1864. The application of Francis Baller, a free negro woman, for permission to remain in the Commonwealth, and reside in this city, was continued till the October term. Martha Hobson, a free negro woman, wife of Hobson, the barber, was recently ordered by the Mayor to receive 20 lashes for failure to pay a fee incurred by her in leaving the State of Virginia and going North, and then returning to this city, contrary to the laws of the Commonwealth. To this decision an appeal was
s. II. All subscriptions to said loan by others than States, to be paid within sixty days from the date thereof, and those by States, on or before the 1st day of May, 1864. For the amount so paid the subscriber shall receive from the Confederate Treasury Department a certificate, entitling him, on and after the 1st day of May,1st day of May, 1864, to an equivalent amount in bonds of the Confederate Government, coupon or registered, as he shall elect, bearing six per cent. interest from the date of payment, redeemable at the end of twenty years; both principal and interest to be exempted from taxation, and secured by pledge of adequate export duties; the interest to be payable semi-annually, and receivable in payment of public dues to the Confederate Government. Or in the event that Congress shall fail, on or before the 1st day of May, 1864, to authorize the issue of such stock, or that the aggregate subscription to said loan shall not by that period have reached the sum of four hundred million
ructing the Committee of Finance to inquire into the expediency of authorizing a sale by the Collector of the tax in kind to the agents appointed by the county courts, in their several districts, to provide relief for the families of soldiers, such portion of the tithes as can be conveniently collected by the Government agents. The bill to regulate the next meeting of Congress was then taken up. The bill was amended so as to fix the time of the meeting of the next Congress on the first Monday of May, 1864. Mr. Johnson, of Ark., moved to reconsider the last vote and lay the bill upon the table. The bill was reconsidered and laid upon the table, to be called up on a future day. A message was received from the President transmitting copies of the correspondence of Major- General Whiting relative to the running of the blockade. On motion of Mr. Sparrow, of La., the Senate went into secret session. The House was opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. Duncan. The
s in the foregoing grades shall have the same privilege of purchasing commissary and quartermaster's stores as are now or may hereafter be allowed to officers of the army. Mr. Clay, of Ala., presented a communication from the Confederate States Chief Engineer at Mobile, submitting a plan for employing slaves in the engineer department, which was referred to the Military Committee. On motion of Mr. Hill, of Ga., the bill fixing the time of the next meeting of Congress on the first Monday in May, 1864, was taken up and passed. On motion of Mr. Maxwell, the Senate resolved into secret session. The doors being reopened, on motion of Mr. Maxwell, of Fla., the privilege of the floor of the Senate was extended to Major General John C. Breckinridge, of Ky. On motion of Mr. Clay, of Ala, the Senate adjourned. The House met at 11 o'clock, and was opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. Edwards. Mr. Goode, of Va., offered a resolution that a special committee of five be
The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the Confederate States of America will meet in the Presbyterian Church at Charlotte, N. C., on the 1st Tuesday of May, 1864. Bishop Ames has been empowered by Lincoln to "take charge" of the Methodist Churches in New Orleans. Miss Mary Bryan Hart, a school teacher, was burned to death last week in Halifax county, N. C. She fell into the fire while laboring under a fit. A young lady named Catherine Morrissey was killed by lightning in Charleston, S. C., on Friday last. Major Gen. Wharton has been transferred to Texas, of which State he is a native. Beef is selling in Marietta, Ga., at sixty cents a pound.
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