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Thomas A. Smythe Brigadier GeneralDec. 23, 1864, to Feb. 25, 1865. 2nd Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralFeb. 28, 1865, to Apr. 7, 1865.Mortally Wounded3d Brigade, 2nd Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Brigadier GeneralNov. 15, 1864, to Dec. 22, 1864. 3d Brigade, 2nd Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 1st Del. InfantryFeb. 13, 1864, to March 25, 1864. 2d Brigade, 3d Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 1st Del. InfantryJuly 31, 1864, to Aug. 22, 1864. 2nd Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 1st Del. InfantryJuly 4, 1863, to Aug. 14, 1863. 2d Brigade, 3d Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 1st Del. InfantryMarch 25, 1864, to May 17, 1864. 2d Brigade, 1st Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 1st Del. InfantryMay 16, 1863, to July 3, 1863. 2d Brigade, 3d Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 1st Del. InfantrySept. 3, 1863,
B. C. Tilghman Col. 3d U. S. Colored InfantryApr. 7, 1865, to Apr. 19, 1865. 4th Separate Brigade, Northern District--Folly Island and Morris Island, Department of the South Col. 3d U. S. Colored InfantryFeb. 25, 1864, to Apr. 25, 1864. 2d Brigade, Vodges' 2d Division, Department of the South
Daniel Woodall Col. 1st Dela. InfantryApr. 7, 1865, to June 28, 1865. 3d Brigade, 2nd Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac Col. 1st Dela. InfantryFeb. 10, 1865, to Feb. 28, 1865. 3d Brigade, 2nd Division, Second Army Corps, Army of the Potomac
S. B. M. Young Col. 4th Penn. CavalryApr. 7, 1865, to May 28, 1865. 2d Brigade, 2d Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Rhode Island Volunteers. (search)
River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28. Swift Creek or Arrowfield Church May 9-10. Operations against Fort Darling May 12-16. Battle of Drewry's Bluff May 14-16. On Bermuda Hundred line May 16-June 15. Before Petersburg June 15-18. Siege operations against Petersburg and Richmond June 16, 1864, to April 2, 1865. Battle of Chaffin's Farm September 28-30, 1864. Duty at Aiken's Landing October 7-November 8, 1864, and at Chaffin's Farm before Richmond till April 7, 1865. Moved to Richmond April 7, and duty there till June 25. Mustered out June 27, 1865. Battery lost during service 10 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 17 Enlisted men by disease. Total 27. Battery G, 1st Rhode Island Regiment Light Artillery Organized at Providence December, 1861. Left State for Washington, D. C., December 7. Attached to Sedgwick's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Reserve Artillery, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to
1, 1864, 154. Gainesville, Feb. 15, 1864, 155. Olustee, Feb. 20, 1864,160. Cedar Run, March 1, 1864, 178. Cedar Run, April 2, 1864, 183. James Island, July 2, 1864, 200. Fort Johnson, July 3, 1864, 206. King's Creek, July 3, 1864, 208. James Island, July 4, 1864, 210. John's Island, July 7, 1864, 212. Bloody Bridge, July 9, 1884, 214. Honey Hill, Nov. 30, 1864, 241. Devaux's Neck, Dec. 6, 1864, 256. Devaux's Neck, Dec. 7, 1864, 257. Devaux's Neck, Dec. 9, 1864, 259. Eppes' Bridge, April 7, 1865, 292. Dingle's Mill, April 9, 1865, 294. Round Hill, April 15, 1865, 299. Boykin's Mills, April 18, 1865, 301. Big Rafting Creek, April 19, 1865, 305. Statesburg, April 19, 1865, 306. Eppes' Bridge, S. C., 292. Escort, steamer, 109. Eutaw Springs, S. C., 295. Evacuation of Morris Island, 123. Evans, John W., 173. Examining Board for officers, 311. Exchange of prisoners, 107, 218, 221, 233. Executive document, 96. Explosion in Sumter, 141. F. F Company, 20, 38
ediately crossed over. The Sixth corps and a division of cavalry crossed at Farmville to its support. Feeling now that General Lee's chance of escape was utterly hopeless, I addressed him the following communication from Farmville: April 7, 1865. General: The result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my duty to shift from myself the respo of that portion of the Confederate States army known as the Army of Northern Virginia. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. General R. E. Lee. Early on the morning of the eighth, before leaving, I received at Farmville the following: April 7, 1865. General: I have received your note of this date. Though not entertaining the opinion you express on the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the army of Northern Virginia, I reciprocate your desire to avoid useless effusion
dquarters Second division, cavalry corps, military division of the Mississippi, Selma, Ala., April 7, 1865. Major — I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my division fteers. headquarters First brigade, Second division cavalry corps, M. D. M., Selma, Alabama, April 7, 1865. Captain T. W. Scott, A. A. A. General, Second division. Captain — I have the honor to maBrigade. headquarters First brigade, Second division, cavalry corps, M. D. M., Selma, Ala., April 7, 1865. Captain — I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by this brigadA. A. G., First Brigade. headquarters Ninety-Eighth Illinois mounted infantry, Selma, Ala., April 7, 1865. Captain O. F. Bane, A. A. A. G., First Brigade, &c. sir:--I have the honor to report thaon, Brevet Major-General. (Declined.) headquarters cavalry corps, M. D. M., Selma, Alabama, April 7, 1865. (Special Field Order No. 16.) The Brevet Major-General commanding congratulates the
erwhelming forces was still in progress, the following correspondence, commenced at Farmville, had taken place between the two commanders, terminated by Lee's seeking the final interview, when he received the message referred to from Gordon: April 7, 1865. Gen. R. E. Lee, Commanding C. S. A.: General: The result of last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in this struggle. I feel that it is so, and regard it as my du, by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate Southern army, known as the Army of Northern Virginia. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General, commanding Armies of the United States. April 7, 1865. General: I have received your note of this day. Though not entirely of the opinion you express of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia, I reciprocate your desire to avoid useless effusion of
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 5: the Jubilee.—1865. (search)
th anniversary of the surrender of the fort and inauguration of the war. Major-General Robert Anderson had been appointed to perform the act, and Henry Ward Beecher engaged to deliver an oration on the occasion. A similar invitation was extended to George Thompson, and a state-room was assigned for their joint use on the steamer Arago, which conveyed the invited guests from New York to Charleston. On reaching New York, Mr. Garrison received the following telegram: Washington, April 7, 1865. The Adjutant-General has been directed to give Captain Garrison a furlough while you are at Charleston. I hope Mr. Lieut. G. T. Garrison. Thompson accompanies you. A formal invitation was forwarded to him I could write much of my own feelings, said George Thompson, in a letter to R. F. Wallcut (April 8), as I look back upon the thirty years and six months which have elapsed since I landed on the shores from which I am now departing. Then I was denounced by a slaveholding Presi
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