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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ainsworth, Frederick Crayton, 1852- (search)
Ainsworth, Frederick Crayton, 1852- Military officer; born in Woodstock, Vt., Sept. 11, 1852; was appointed a first lieutenant and assistant surgeon in the United States army in 1874; promoted major and surgeon in 1891; colonel and chief of the Record and Pension Office in the War Department in 1892; and brigadier-general in 1899. He invented and introduced the index-record card system, by the use of which the full military history of any soldier may be immediately traced. About 50,000.000 of these cards have been placed on file, and their introduction has resulted in a yearly saving of more than $400,000. In 1898 he succeeded Gen. George W. Davis as supervisor of the publication of the official records of the Civil War.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alaska, (search)
ey completed plans for thorough surveys and explorations by both geological and topographical experts, especially to supplement the important work of his bureau in 1898, and to acquire a fuller knowledge of the remarkable Cape Nome district and its extension in the Seward Peninsula. This work was expected to occupy several years.to concede, and, as a result, the delimitation of the boundary was made one of the subjects for determination by the Anglo-American commission (q. v.) appointed in 1898 for the purpose of negotiating a plan for the settlement of all matters in controversy between the United States and Canada. The commission, after several sessionzations. were pushing forward, as rapidly as the face of the country would permit, the advantages of civilization hitherto unknown in that bleak region. Early in 1898 an aerial railway was constructed over the Chilkoot Pass to Lake Linderman, a unique enterprise that shortened the time between tidewater and the headwaters of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alger, Russell Alexander, 1836- (search)
Alger, Russell Alexander, 1836- Secretary of War: born in Lafayette, O., Feb. 27, 1836; worked on a farm for years earning Russell A. Alger. money to defray the expenses of his education. He was admitted to the bar in 1859, but was forced by ill health to give up practice. When the Civil War broke out he entered the Union army as a captain, and rose to brevet brigadier-general of volunteers. After the war he entered the lumber business, in which he acquired a large fortune. He was governor of Michigan in 1885-87; was a candidate for the Republican Presidential nomination in 1888; was commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic in 1889-90; and became Secretary of War under President McKinley in 1897. During almost all of the American-Spanish War in 1898 he was subjected to much public censure on account of alleged shortcomings in the various bureaus of the War Department. He resigned his office in 1899, and wrote a history of the war with Spain.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ammen, Daniel, 1820-1898 (search)
Ammen, Daniel, 1820-1898 Naval officer; born in Brown county, O., May 15, 1820; entered the navy as a midshipman in 1836. In 1861-62 he commanded the gunboat Seneca in the South Atlantic blockading fleet. His bravery was conspicuous in the battle of Port Royal, Nov. 7, 1861. Later, under Dupont's command, he took part in all the operations on the coasts of Georgia and. Florida. In the engagements with Fort McAllister, March 3, 1863, and with Fort Sumter, April 7, 1863, he commanded the monitor Patapsco. In the attacks on Fort Fisher, in December, 1864, and January, 1865, he commanded the Mohican. He was promoted to rear-admiral in 1877, and was retired June 4, 1878. Afterwards he was a member of the board to locate the new Naval Observatory, and a representative of the United States at the Interoceanic Ship Canal Congress in Paris. He designed a cask balsa to facilitate the landing of troops and field artillery; a life-raft for steamers; and the steel ram Katahdin. His pu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrews, Elisha Benjamin, 1844- (search)
Andrews, Elisha Benjamin, 1844- Educator: born in Hinsdale, N. H., Jan. 10,) 1844; graduated at Brown University in 1870, and at Newton Theological Institute in 1874; was president of Brown University in 1889-98; superintendent of the Chicago Public Schools in 1898-1900; and in the last year became chancellor of the University of Nebraska. He is author of History of the United States; An honest dollar, a plea for bimetallism, etc. Andrews, Elisha Benjamin, 1844- Educator: born in Hinsdale, N. H., Jan. 10,) 1844; graduated at Brown University in 1870, and at Newton Theological Institute in 1874; was president of Brown University in 1889-98; superintendent of the Chicago Public Schools in 1898-1900; and in the last year became chancellor of the University of Nebraska. He is author of History of the United States; An honest dollar, a plea for bimetallism, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andrews, John Newman, 1838- (search)
Andrews, John Newman, 1838- Military officer; born in Wilmington, Del., Sept. 16, 1838; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1860; promoted first lieutenant in 1861; colonel, in 1895; and was retired April 1, 1899. From June 3, 1898, to Feb. 24, 1899, be was a brigadier-general of volunteers. After the Civil War he served in a number of Indian campaigns, and in 1898 through the war with Spain.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Angell, James Burrill, 1829- (search)
Angell, James Burrill, 1829- Educator and diplomatist; born in Scituate, R. I., Jan. 7, 1829; was graduated at Brown University; in 1849; Professor of Modern Languages and Literature at Brown University in 1853-60; president of the University of Vermont in 1866-71; and since 1871 president of the University of Michigan. In 1880-81 he was United States minister to China; in 1887 a member of the Anglo-American Commission on Canadian Fisheries: in 1896 chairman of the Canadian-American Commission on Deep Waterways from the Great Lakes to the Sea: and in 1897-98 United States minister to Turkey. He is author of numerous addresses, and magazine articles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anti-Expansionists, (search)
Anti-Expansionists, An old phrase in American political history which was resurrected during the Presidential campaign of 1900, and applied to those who were opposed to the extension of American territory which had been brought about during the first administration of President McKinley, principally as a result of the war with Spain in 1898. The administration was charged not only by its Democratic opponents, but by many able men in the Republican party, with expansionist or imperialist tendencies considered foreign to the national policy of the country. While those who opposed the territorial expansion which had been accomplished, anti also was pending, in the matter of the future of the Philippine Islands, were not sufficiently strong to organize an independent political party, the large number of them within and without the Republican party created a sharp complication in the Presidential campaign. The position of the two great parties on this issue is shown in the followin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Appropriations by Congress. (search)
ferent objects for which the appropriations are made: Deficiencies.Forts and fortifications. Legislative, executive, and judicial.Military Academy. Post office Department. Sundry civil.Pensions. Army.Consular and Diplomatic. Navy.Agricultural Department. Indian.District of Columbia. River and harbor.Miscellaneous. The accompanying table will show that the total amount of appropriation increases with each Congress. appropriations by Congress, 1894-1901.  1894.1895.1896.1897.1898.1899.1900.1901. Deficiencies$21,226,495$9,450,820$8,519,981$13,900,106$8,594,447.64$347,165,001.82$46,882,724.75$13,767,008.75 Legislative, Executive, and Judicial21,866,30321,343,97721,885,81821,519,75121,690,766.9021,625,846.6523,394,051.8624,175,652.53 Sundry Civil27,550,15825,856,43235,096,04529,812,11334,344,970.4733,997,752.7039,381,733.8649,594,309.70 Support of the Army24,225,64023,592,88523,252,60823,278,40323,129,344.3023,193,392.0080,430,204.06114,220,095.55 Naval Service22,10
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armour, Philip Danforth, 1832- (search)
Armour, Philip Danforth, 1832- Philanthropist; born in Stockbridge, N. Y., May 16, 1832; received a public school education. In 1852-56 he was a miner in California; in 1856-63 engaged in the commission business in Milwaukee, Wis., and then became a member of the firm of Plankinton, Armour & Company, meat packers. Mr. Armour was a man of large benevolence. In 1892 he built the Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago at a cost of $1,500,000, and in the same year endowed it with $1,400,000; in 1898 he increased this endowment by $500,000; and in 1899 made another addition of $750,000. He died in Chicago, Jan. 6, 1901.
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