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iant and forward among the Northern heroes is Gen. John E. Wool, of New York, who has been freely bestowing his advice and suggestions upon Gen. Scott. It appears, however, that the General-in-Chief is disposed to "snub" his subordinate. Thus, we have it: Headquarters of the Army.Washington, April 28 Major General John E Wool, U. S. A., Commanding Department of the East, New York City: General: --The General-in-Chief desires me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 25th instant, and to say, in reply, that the very great necessity which exists for carrying on the business of the several Staff Departments with system under their proper chiefs, compels him to request you will give no orders interfering with the purchase or issue of army supplies, such orders being in all cases directed by the General in-Chief himself. The General regrets your infirm health does not permit him to assign you to an important command away from your headquarters, and he recomme
M. Wilderman, a Maryland drover, was knocked down and robbed of a large amount of money, near Fairmont, Virginia, last week. Thirteen of the New York Banks on Saturday week contributed nearly half a million of dollars for the defence of the Government. The Mobile Cadets, now in Virginia, are possessed of property worth in the aggregate between three and four millions of dollars. John Cochran, of Marion county, Va., was killed while attempting to get on a railroad train, on the 25th ult. The report that the Rev. Dr. Hawks, of New York, intended to resign his charge, is contradicted. Greiner, who was arrested in Philadelphia for "treason," has been admitted to bail in the sum of $10,000. The residence of C. Boggess, Esq., in Lewis county, Va., was consumed by fire recently. Captain Theodore Fink, U. S. A., died of apoplexy, at Detroit, on the 3d instant. Three thousand troops were encamped at New Orleans on the 1st instant. Isaac Henderson ha
Drunken soldiers. --During the forenoon, Baltimore street was several times the scene of excitement growing out of the reprehensible language and behavior of drunken Federal soldiers, who, in squads of three or four, were roaming about, if not for the purpose of provoking a collision, certainly in a manner well calculated to lead to one. About half-past 2 o'clock a disturbance took place between several of these representatives of Federal authority and the crowd usually congregated at the corner of Baltimore and South streets, which, for a few minutes, bid fair to lead to serious results. Pistols were drawn and brandished by the soldiers, and but for the prompt interference of the police, and the efforts of one of the soldiers more sober than the rest, a bloody collision might have occurred.--Balto, South, 25th
Recent Deaths. --Hon. George M. Keim died at his residence in Reading, Pa., last Monday evening, after a brief illness. He was one of the Breckinridge electors in the last election.--John Sloan, the well known actor and theatrical manager, died in Liverpool on the 25th ult.--The New York papers announce the death of T. B. Johnson, the comedian, who played a season in Richmond not long ago.
lank range, and charged with fixed bayonets. The enemy broke and fled panic-stricken, with our men in full pursuit. When the fight and pursuit were over, we were drawn up in line and received the thanks of Gen. Johnston for what he termed our "extraordinary and desperate stand." Gen. Beauregard sent word to Major Wheat, "you, and your battalion, for this day's work, shall never be forgotten, whether you live or die." Trouble in the Cherokee Nation. The Fort Smith Times, of the 25th ult., learns that Montgomery, the notorious brigand, has arrived on the Western frontier and commenced fortifying himself in the Cherokee nation. He had taken several hundred eattle from the Cherokees living in that part of the country, and killed four of the Indians of that tribe. The Times is further informed that Stand Watie had sent to Tablequah for ten kegs of powder, but could only get two kegs. There is great excitement in the Nation, and a large number of the Pin party have chan
than was at first anticipated, taxation by the General Government, and next by the State, increasing, I have been induced to call the Legislature together to see whether they are willing to continue the liberal course which was inaugurated when the contest first began. The privateer Dixie. A dispatch from New York, August 11th, says: The schooner Mary Alice arrived here this morning, having sailed on the 21st ult. from Guayadquilla for New York, with 210 barrels sugar. On the 25th ult. she was captured by the privateer Dixie, Capt. Welch, and three of the crew were taken aboard the Dixie and a privateer crew placed aboard the Mary Alice, with orders to take her to Charleston or Wilmington; but on the 3d inst. she was recaptured by the U. S. frigate Wabash, and the privateer crew were transferred to that vessel. While preparing her papers to send the Mary Alice to New York, and with the latter in tow, the Wabash captured the brig Sarah Starr, which had no pairing
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource], Remedy for all the diseases of the hog. (search)
Grand concert. --A grand concert will be given at Metropolitan Hall on Wednesday, 25th inst., by a competent corps of volunteer performers, for the benefit of the sick and wounded soldiers. Mr. J. W. Rosier will have the direction of the performance. That it will be generally patronized by our citizens, there is no doubt. No appeal to them in behalf of the Southern cause, Southern soldiers, or Southern credit, has been made in vain.
Night came on. At 8 P. M., all of our band whose fortune it was to return had landed on Harrison Island, and the fire from the Virginia heights had ceased. The rebels took all our guns but one. When I left yesterday they had shouted to us, telling us to come over and take away our dead sons of b — s under a flag of truce, had also mounted our own guns on the heights, and warned us to leave the island in four hours. The Washington Star's account. From the Washington Star, of the 25th inst., (the king devil of all Abolitiondom,) we gather the following in relation to the affair: It has transpired that Major Gen. MeClellan did not design throwing either the force of Gen. Stone or Gen. Banks over the river; and that all that was really intended by Gen. Stone was to accomplish a reconnaissance in some force, without fighting an engagement. To that end Col. Devens was sent over the river with 300 men, and on Col. Baker was devolved the duty of covering Col. Devens's ret
Night came on. At 8 P. M., all of our band whose fortune it was to return had landed on Harrison Island, and the fire from the Virginia heights had ceased. The rebels took all our guns but one. When I left yesterday they had shouted to us, telling us to come over and take away our dead sons of b — s under a flag of truce, had also mounted our own guns on the heights, and warned us to leave the island in four hours. The Washington Star's account. From the Washington Star, of the 25th inst., (the king devil of all Abolitiondom,) we gather the following in relation to the affair: It has transpired that Major Gen. MeClellan did not design throwing either the force of Gen. Stone or Gen. Banks over the river; and that all that was really intended by Gen. Stone was to accomplish a reconnaissance in some force, without fighting an engagement. To that end Col. Devens was sent over the river with 300 men, and on Col. Baker was devolved the duty of covering Col. Devens's ret
Proclamation of the Governor of Tennessee--Thirty thousand militia called out. Nashville, Nov. 20. --General A. S. Johnston, in view of a threatened invasion of the State, has called on Governor Harris to send such a force to the field as can be armed by the State. In obedience to this requisition and to repel the invaders, Governor Harris has, this morning, issued his proclamation calling out thirty thousand of the militia from Middle and West Tennessee. The officers in command of the militia of the second, third, and fourth divisions, among whom the requisition is apportioned, are directed to hold then commands in readiness to receive marching orders by the 25th instant, unless in the meantime a sufficient number of volunteers should tender their services to fill the requisition.
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