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The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Ten Dollars Reward. --Run away from the subscriber, on Thursday, 12th September, a Negro Man, named Bob. Said Negro is black; rather a thin face; with moustache. He originally came from Washington, D. C., and speaks with a Northern accent. I will give the above reward for his delivery to me. se 18--ts John Lindsay.
Ten Dollars Reward. --Ran away from the subscriber, on Thursday, 12th September, a Negro Man, named Bob. Said Negro is black; rather a thin face; with moustache. He originally came from Washington, D. C., and speaks with a Northern accent. I will give the above reward for his delivery to me. se 18--ts John Lindsay.
Secessionists of that region are arming again. Some 2,000 are concentrated in Andrew county, under Major Poller, and about the same number of Unionists, composed of Missourians and Iowans, under Colonels Croner and Andrews, are stationed in the same region, and both are preparing for a battle, which is shortly expected. Washington telegrams of yesterday announce that St. Joseph is now completely in the hands of the Confederates. This news confirms the following: Hannibal, Mo., Sept. 12. --All we hear confirms the previous reports that the Secessionists have full possession of St. Joseph and are doing pretty much as they please in that city. It is reported that they have taken control of the municipal affairs of the corporation, preventing egress and ingress of both goods and travelers. They have also levied heavy contributions on several stores, taking just what they want. From all we can learn the Union men and their property in St. Joseph and the surrounding country
ttle, nor do we know the result. The troops at Lexington are strongly encamped. Gen. Pope, at last accounts, was at Hamilton with six or eight thousand troops. Important Captures. The St. Louis Republican, of the 14th, has a special dispatch from Jefferson City, dated the 13th, which states that Colonel Mitchell, with a regiment of Confederates, had captured Boonville, Mo. We subjoin the following important news of the movement of Martin Greene: Hudson, Macon Co., Sept. 12.--I have just had an interview with an intelligent gentleman of St. Louis, who left Glasgow, Howard county, yesterday. He informs me that he met there Martin Greene, at the head of three thousand five hundred mounted men. He conversed with Greene, but learned nothing of his plans or destination any further than was indicated by his crossing the river with his whole force yesterday, moving southward from Glasgow. He took possession of the steamer Sunshine, which was lying at Glasgow, a
e, third volunteers, September 11; Lieut. Col. E. Hisley, fifth volunteers, September 12; Major L. E. Hamilton, fifth volunteers, September 12; Captain E. W. ThompsoSeptember 12; Captain E. W. Thompson, fifth volunteers, September 12; First Lieut. W. D. Maley, third volunteers, September 3; Captain O. J. Conant, fourth volunteers, September 2. Massachusetts.September 12; First Lieut. W. D. Maley, third volunteers, September 3; Captain O. J. Conant, fourth volunteers, September 2. Massachusetts.--Assistant Surgeon P. A. O' Connell, ninth volunteers, September 12; Second Lieutenant C. H. DeLord, eleventh volunteers, September 12; Captain J. W. Butters, eleveSeptember 12; Second Lieutenant C. H. DeLord, eleventh volunteers, September 12; Captain J. W. Butters, eleventh volunteers, September 13; Second Lieutenant W. E. Farwell, eleventh volunteers, September 14; Captain Edward Fitzgerald, ninth volunteers, September 3. MiSeptember 12; Captain J. W. Butters, eleventh volunteers, September 13; Second Lieutenant W. E. Farwell, eleventh volunteers, September 14; Captain Edward Fitzgerald, ninth volunteers, September 3. Michigan.--Captain Charles S. May, second volunteers, September 13; Lieut. G. Kost, second volunteers, September 13; Lieut. G. N. Parks, second volunteers, September s, September 10; Second Lieutenant Samuel Woill, twenty-seventh volunteers, September 12; Lieutenant J. Aub, R. Q. M. dragoons, September 10; Capt. A. N. Ridney, twe
he Powhatan. We extract the following from the correspondence of the New York Times: Panama, Thursday, Sept. 26, 1861. --The steam gunboat Keystone States, Commander Scott, with 140 men, arrived at Aspinwall yesterday from Surinam. She will remain at Aspinwall five or six days, and take 350 tons of coal. She reports that the gunboat Iroquois was at St. Thomas on the 8th. The steam war-ship Richmond took coals in at Kingston, Jamaica, Sept, 3 The Powhatan left Surinam on the 12th of September. The Confederate steamer Sumter left Surinam on the 1st of September, steaving east, with has embs-task down, but it is supposed she had gone home. She bought coals at Surinam, after having been refused it from Government supplies, of some English merchants. Stil had been to Demarara, but could not get cool She then went to French Guiana, but the commander there refused her coal, saying the Government had none to spare. Coals ar scarce all through the West India Islands, at least t
is connected with Col. Savage's Regiment Tennessee Volunteers, Gen. Donelson's Brigade, a little negro about twelve years old, belonging to one of the "boys," who deserves, perhaps more than a passing notice. Fat, sancy, small for his age, with large eyes, and as "black as black can be," he is known as "Dave." During a late skirmish between the rear guard of Gen. Donelson's brigade, and about four hundred of the enemy, back of the fortifications at "Conch's," on the morning of the 12th September last, (in which twenty-five of the enemy were killed, Donelson loosing but one man,) Dave was one of the first to run down the hill to see the fight, but was immediately ordered back by one of the officers. This he did not like, but, in "obedience to orders," back he went, and, after climbing up the hill, took position on an old stump standing where he could view the fight, and at the same time see the brigade pass at double quick in single file — for the path was only about twelve inches
hat we are hourly expecting the Abs. from New Mexico 2,600 strong. Everything like stores, &c., have been removed to Fort Quitman, below Bliss; and we intend fighting them here, relying on a just Providence to equal our numbers. Our force, all told, is but 600, but good and true men. Expresses have been sent to Sibley to hurry up. I expect to be in Santa Fe, the capital of New Mexico, Christmas day. Some twenty Californians have just arrived here from California. They bring dates of September 12th, and we learn with pleasure that Sumner is not coming here with troops, that he can't raise them." Missouri refugees in Texas. The Southwest, published in Texas, has the following item: Scarcely a day passes that we do not see from one to a dozen wagons in our town, accompanied by men, women, and children — white and black — fleeing from oppression in Missouri. Many have barely escaped with their clothing, and have been compelled to abandon their homes, crops and all they
From the West. Kentuckians Rallying to Morgan — Acknowledgment of a Rout from Bull Nelson — Arrival of Confederate prisoners at Vicksburg — a fight in Louisiana, &c. Mobile,September 12. --A special dispatch to the Advertiser, dated Knoxville, yesterday, says: Dr. D. W. Strader arrived this morning in charge of a Yankee stage, bringing three prisoners, captured by Morgan on the 31st, at Columbia. Ky. He reports that the Kentuckians are flying to Morgan by hundreds — a general uprising of the people. Buell's army, it is said, has left Nashville, taking the Edgefield road to Bowling Green. Gen. Bragg is in full chase of him. The Register (extra) of to day contains a letter from Morgan's command, giving glorious accounts of the progress of our cause. Morgan is arresting prominent Union citizens, and taking their bonds, conditioned that they are to be exchanged for Southerners, and report as prisoners of war. Louisville dates of the 3d contain Bul
Nashville again evacuated. Chattanooga, Sept. 12. --The enemy have again evacuated Nashville, this time going down the Cumberland river. The occupation of Clarksville and Fort Donelson was for the purpose of securing this route of retreat. The tone and appearance of the Louisville papers indicate the apprehension of the speedy occupation of that place by the Confederates. A train on the Nashville road started for Tullahoma, eighty miles from here, to-day.
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