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The Daily Dispatch: July 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 2 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 29, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
he Navy Yard had begun. Two hours later, at eight o'clock in the evening, the Pawnee came in sight of Norfolk. The Cumberland was lying off the Yard, and went to quarters as the strange vessel approached. A fresh wind, blowing down the stream, prevented her from making out the Pawnee's answer to her hail, but the latter could hear the voice of the officer commanding the Cumberland's pivot gun, asking if he should fire. On board the Pennsylvania, which was lying below the Cumberland, Lieutenant Allen, seeing the imminence of the danger, with extraordinary presence of mind, called out to the commanding officer, asking him to cheer the approaching vessel. In an instant it was done; and the Pawnee was saved from what seemed an inevitable catastrophe. It had been Paulding's intention to make a disposition of the vessels at various points between Norfolk and the mouth of the river in such a way as to command the channel. He would have been able to hold this position until the arriva
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
f them and acquaint the flag-officer, that a proper force might be sent for their reduction. On reaching a marshy island half a mile below Beaufort there was a great commotion; a crowd of persons and several men on horseback left hastily; crowds of negroes were in the streets, others plundering the houses, and loading every scow and boat that they could lay their hands on. They were wild with joy, and had, in their belief, wealth that should satiate desire. Only one white man was found, a Mr. Allen, who was brought on board. He appeared to be suffering from some strong excitement or the effects of liquor. After giving to him assurances of protection to life and property, which the flag-officer had directed to be given to peaceable inhabitants, he was sent on shore. On the return of the vessels to Port Royal they were boarded by boat crews of negroes, who stated that many of the slaves had been shot by their masters in endeavoring to escape being driven off the island. They wer
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
he executive officer had no fears that the water would not run aft and be pumped out; a small gutter, six by eight inches in dimensions, permitted a flow with whatever velocity the head would give it. The commanding officer had left the vessel soon after nine o'clock, and was on board the flag-ship near by until signal was made from the Weehawken that she was sinking. At about 1 P. M. Ensign Chadwick, observing that the water partially flooded the captain's cabin, called the assistance of Mr. Allen, the chief engineer, and they put on and secured the cross-bars to the iron door before mentioned. The water gradually rose in the windlass-room, as indicated by the leak about the door and in about thirty minutes it was on the top of the door (Reports of Stuyvesant and Chadwick). A court of inquiry found that the causes of the sinking of the Weehawken were: The additional weight of ammunition that had been lately put on board of her, leaving her trim so little by the stern as n
ospect to surrender or to precipitately retreat. In the Appendix will be found the list of the vessels engaged, by whom commanded, the batteries, and the casualties in the fleet. Among the killed in the assault were Lieutenants Preston and Porter, both of them young officers of great ability and admirable qualities; also Assistant-Surgeon Longshaw and Ensign Wiley, and by the explosion of the magazine, Paymaster Gillett and Ensign Leighton. There were wounded in the assault, Lieutenant-Commander Allen, Lieutenants Bache, Lamson, and Baury; Ensigns Evans, Harris, Chester, Bertwistle, O'Connor, Coffin, and Wood; Acting-Master Louch, and Mates Green, Simms, and Aldridge. In relation to Flag-Captain Breese, who led the assault, Lieutenant-Commander Parker said in his report: He led the advance to the palisades, and when he saw the rear delaying, endeavored, sword in hand, to bring them forward to our support. Failing to accomplish this, he returned, under a shower of bullets di
oast of, 7 Agassiz, the, 197 Alabama, the, Confederate vessel, 74, 228 Albatross, the, 66 Albemarle, the, 200, 203 et seq. Aldridge, Mate, 237 Allen, Chief Engineer, 143 Allen, Lieutenant-Commander, 237 Allen, Mr., 34 America, the, 61 Ames, General, 241 Ammen, Lieutenant-Commanding Daniel, 21Allen, Lieutenant-Commander, 237 Allen, Mr., 34 America, the, 61 Ames, General, 241 Ammen, Lieutenant-Commanding Daniel, 21; at Fort McAllister, 87; off Charleston, 92, 160, 162 (note) Anderson, Colonel R. H., 85 (note) Andrews, Major, 169 Arey, Master, 220 Aries, the, 229 Armstrong, of the Georgia, 194 Arrow, the Confederate steamer, 211 Atlanta, the Confederate ironclad, 82 (note); capture of, 117 et seq., 157, 206 Augusta, Allen, Mr., 34 America, the, 61 Ames, General, 241 Ammen, Lieutenant-Commanding Daniel, 21; at Fort McAllister, 87; off Charleston, 92, 160, 162 (note) Anderson, Colonel R. H., 85 (note) Andrews, Major, 169 Arey, Master, 220 Aries, the, 229 Armstrong, of the Georgia, 194 Arrow, the Confederate steamer, 211 Atlanta, the Confederate ironclad, 82 (note); capture of, 117 et seq., 157, 206 Augusta, the, 21, 77, 81 B. Bache, Lieutenant, 237 Bacon, Lieutenant-Commander, George, 72, 129 Badger, Lieutenant-Commander, 128, 134 Baker, Captain, C. E., 179 Baker, Master's Mate Henry, 196 Balch, Commander G. B., 129, 145 Bankhead, Lieutenant-Commanding John P., 21 Barnard, Captain, Ephraim, 25 Barnes, L
he line often approaching to within thirty or forty yards, as the enemy would charge upon Totten's battery and would be driven back. General Price was painfully wounded in the side, but did not leave the field. He only said to those who were near him that if he were as slim as Lyon the bullet would not have hit him. Weightman was borne to the rear dying; Cawthorn and his adjutant were mortally wounded; Slack was desperately wounded; Clark was shot in the leg; Col. Ben Brown was killed; Colonel Allen, of General Price's staff, was killed by the side of his chief; Colonels Burbridge, Kelly, Foster and numerous field officers were disabled. But Lyon was worse hurt than Price. He had, however, risked everything on the chance, and in the shadow of impending defeat was determined to make a supreme effort to reverse the tide that was setting strongly against him. Dismounted, he was leading his horse along his battle line, speaking words of encouragement to his men, when his horse was kil
o Shreveport. But before he got there, the army was formally surrendered. Shelby then determined to go to Mexico. Confusion reigned supreme. The army had been surrendered. There was neither civil nor military authority to hold the lawless elements in check. His men had the choice to go with him or return to their homes. About 500 went with him. But there was no relaxation of discipline. As he passed through the State he protected the people in all their rights—protected them from the lawlessness of their own disbanded soldiers. At San Antonio he took under his protection Gen. Kirby Smith, General Magruder, General Price, General Hindman, Governor Reynolds of Missouri, Governor Allen of Louisiana and Governor Murrah of Texas, beside a number of other civil and military officers, gave them a guard of honor and escorted them out of the country; and when he and his command crossed the Rio Grande at Eagle Pass, the rear guard—the last vestige—of the Confederate army disappe
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
House, Va. 19, 3 Yorktown, Va., April 5-May 4, 1862 14, 1; 15, 1; 19, 2 Yorktown to Williamsburg, Va. 18, 2 Adams, I. H.: Richmond, Va. 89, 2 Alexander, S.: Chancellorsville Campaign, April 27-May 6, 1863 39, 3 Allen, Charles J: Fort Morgan, Ala., Aug. 9-22, 1864 63, 1 Spanish Fort, Ala., March 27-April 8, 1865 79, 7 Allis, Solon M.: New Berne, N. C. 67, 3; 131, 2 Anderson, Allen: New Mexico, Department of 98, 1 Anderson, PattAllen: New Mexico, Department of 98, 1 Anderson, Patton: Taylor's Store, Ala., and vicinity, July, 1863 80, 12 Anderson, Robert: Charleston Harbor, S. C. 1, 1-3; 2, 1-3 Andrews, Christopher C.: Fort Blakely, Ala., April 9, 1865 61, 6 Andrews, N. S.: Bowling Green, Ky. 103, 1 Andrew., William S.: Roanoke Island, N. C., Feb. 8, 1862 12, 6 Anstey, E. G.: Chickamauga, Campaign, Aug. 16-Sept. 22, 1863 48, 1 Arms, G. H.: Belmont, Mo., Jan. 2, 1862 4, 2 Aschbach, G. A.: Cincinnati, Ohio,
Index *** The names of national officers are in small capitals; those of rebels, in italics. Abercrombie, General J. J., attacked at White House, II. 391. Allatoona pass, turned by Sherman, II., 535; rebels repulsed from, III., 57. Allen Colonel Robert, offered command of entire army at Corinth by Halleck, i., 107. Ames, General, Adalbert, at Fort Fisher, III., 313, 313, 337-345. Anderson, General R. H., at Spottsylvania, II., 141,147; at Cold Harbor, 279; at Culpeper, II., 504; in Valley of Virginia, III., 19-27. Appomattox court-house, Grant's march to, III., 586, 591; battle at, 593; surrender of Lee at, 597-613. Appomattox river, course of, II., 340; W. F. Smith's movement across, 355; crossed by army of Potomac, III., 582. Arkansas, in possession of enemy, II., 2; department of, under Steele, 31, 60, 77; Canby in supreme command of; 204; Price marches through to invade Missouri, III., 44; Price retreats to, 388; operations in, disconnected with principa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
ers and leaders in literature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pau<
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