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Fannie A. Beers, Memories: a record of personal exeperience and adventure during four years of war. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 2 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Indian Territory, (search)
897 Banking. In 1900 there were thirty-three national banks in operation, having $1,400,630 in capital, $482,970 in outstanding circulation, and $437,500 in United States bonds. There were also thirty-one State banks, with $473,833 capital, and $44,051 surplus; and three private banks, with $80,000 capital. Churches and education. The strongest denominations in the Territory are the Methodist Episcopal, South; regular Baptist, South; Disciples of Christ; Presbyterian, North; Roman Catholic; Cumberland Presbyterian; Church of God; and African Methodist. In 1899 there were 387 Evangelical Sunday-schools, with 2,942 officers and teachers, and 16,393 scholars. There are no general school statistics, but the Five Nations, the United States government, and religious societies support over 400 schools. There were in 1899 four public high and ten private secondary schools, the Indian University at Bacone, and Henry Kendall College at Muscogee. Railroads. The total length
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, (search)
s Jenifer, and Daniel Carroll, delegates from Maryland to the convention at Philadelphia, sign the Constitution of the United States......Sept. 17, 1787 Maryland adopts the Constitution......April 28, 1788 Robert H. Harrison, of Maryland, nominated associate justice of the Supreme Court......Sept. 26, 1789 John Carroll, D. D., consecrated bishop of Baltimore, with jurisdiction over all the Catholics in the United States, the first bishop consecrated in the United States (Church, Roman Catholic)......1790 The State, by law, Dec. 23, 1788, cedes to the United States such district 10 miles square Congress may select for the United States capital; the District of Columbia selected......1790 Thomas Johnson, of Maryland, appointed associate justice of Supreme Court......Aug. 5, 1791 Act extending the right of suffrage and substituting the ballot for viva voce voting passed......Dec. 28, 1801 Legislature presents a sword and belt to George Washington Mann, of Maryland, o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Witchcraft, Salem (search)
first was Margaret Jones, of Charlestown, hanged in 1648. In 1656, Ann Hibbens, sister of Governor Bellingham, of Massachusetts, was accused of being a witch, tried by a jury, and found guilty. The magistrates refused to accept the verdict, and the case was carried to the General Court, where a majority of that body declared her guilty, and she was hanged. In 1688 a young girl in Danvers (a part of Salem) accused a maid-servant of theft. The servant's mother, a wild Irishwoman and a Roman Catholic, declared with vehemence that the charge was false, whereupon the accuser, out of revenge, accused the Irishwoman of having bewitched her. Some of the girl's family joined in the accusation and assisted her in her operations. They would alternately become deaf, dumb, and blind; bark like dogs and purr like cats; but none of them lost their appetite or needed sleep. Rev. Cotton Mather—a superstitious, credulous, and egotistical clergyman; a firm believer in witchcraft, and who believe
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 1 (search)
He held, however, many positions of trust and confidence, and was one of the original promoters and vice-president of the institution of First Day (or Sunday) schools, the Rev. Dr. White, afterward Bishop White, being the president. A stanch Roman Catholic, and deeply interested in the welfare of his church, he was mainly instrumental in the building of Saint Mary's Church, of which he was one of the original trustees and a constant attendant, his wife being equally devoted to the Church of Engng year married Margaret Coats Butler, a daughter of Anthony Butler, of Perth Amboy, New Jersey, and granddaughter of Colonel William Coats, a wealthy and prominent citizen of Philadelphia. Like his father and grandfather, he was a zealous Roman Catholic and very influential in the church, and also, like his father, he found his wife in the ranks of the Episcopalians. He had resumed business on his return to Philadelphia, at the same time taking charge of his father's affairs, which, unfor
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
ppy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to Thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep in Jesus. This was witnessed by about twenty fellow-soldiers and the effect upon the feelings of all was very marked. Said a Roman Catholic, who lay near the dying one, with tears in his eyes, and strong emotion, I never want to die happier than that man did. Said another, I never prayed until last night; but when I saw that man die so happy, I determined to seek religion too. hospitals. Until the sick and stores were removed, with reference to an evacuation of the place, three or four of us were busily engaged in spiritual labors among the soldiers. During my whole stay only two men refused tracts from me—one a Roman Catholic, and the other unable to read. As I would go from cot to cot, leaving a tract or a Testament and speaking of Jesus, it was not uncommon for some sufferer in another part of the room to call out, Bring me one. I shall never forget my first v
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
Just as I am—without one plea, But that thy blood was shed for me, And that thou bid'st me come to thee, O Lamb of God, I come, he exclaimed, I come! O Lamb of God, I come! Speaking again of his friends, he said, Tell my father that I died happy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to Thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep in Jesus. This was witnessed by about twenty fellow-soldiers, and the effect upon the feelings of all was very marked. Said a Roman Catholic who lay near the dying one, with tears in his eyes, and strong emotion, I never want to die happier than that man did. Said another, I never prayed until last night; but when I saw that man die so happy, I determined to seek religion too. Rev. J. W. Talley, of Georgia, thus describes the death of his son at Leesburg, from wounds received at Sharpsburg (Antietam): My son, after he had lain in a storehouse from Monday to Tuesday evening on a blanket and a handful of straw, was
Just as I am-without one plea, But that thy blood was shed for me, And that thou bid'st me come to thee, O Lamb of God, I come, he exclaimed, I come! O Lamb of God, I come! Speaking again of his friends, he said, Tell my father that I died happy. His last words were, Father, I'm coming to thee! Then the Christian soldier sweetly and calmly fell asleep in Jesus. This was witnessed by about twenty fellow-soldiers, and the effect upon the feelings of all was very marked. Said a Roman Catholic who lay near the dying one, with tears in his eyes, and strong emotion, I never want to die happier than that man did. Said another, I never prayed until last night; but when I saw that man die so happy, I determined to seek religion too. It was such evidences of the power and value of faith in Christ that made the truth effectual in the salvation of thousands, and that enshrined the cause, for which such Christians fought and fell, so deeply in the hearts of the Southern people.
y was confined, Lewis found his fellow-prisoner in a very depressed condition of mind, although his physical infirmities had been assumed in order to secure an interview with his partner in misfortune. After discussing their situation as philosophically as possible under the circumstances, seeking for some ray of hope and finding none, they were at last compelled to the belief that their doom was sealed, and that their only plan was to bear up manfully to the end. Scully, who was a Roman Catholic, desired the services of a priestly comforter, to whom he could make such statements as would relieve his mind in the coming trial, and made known this wish to Lewis. You will not tell him what you know of Webster, and his connection with this matter, will you? said Lewis, fearful that Webster might be betrayed. I don't know what I will tell him, answered Scully; I have not decided what to say, nor do I know what I will be commanded to relate. For God's sake, Scully, don't s
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 22: more mingled races (search)
by the aspect of the latest arrivals are apt to forget the looks of some that preceded them. Those early squalid crowds have simply vanished in their descendants. Who that sees the vast and well-dressed congregations that come and go to our Roman Catholic churches can recall the advance-guard of the Irish immigration as it came among us sixty years ago-poor Paddy, whose country is his wheelbarrow, as Emerson says, whose first act on arrival was to dig himself an earthen shanty, and live in it? Who that sees the equally prosperous French Canadian congregations pouring out of the great Roman Catholic churches of Fall River, Massachusetts, or Woonsocket, Rhode Island, can recall the Canadian families that used to cross the frontier forty or fifty years ago — a man, a woman, twelve children, and a large bundle? Each of those early migrations was a step in progress; as De Tocqueville pointed out in his day, a log hut in America was not a home, but a halting-place on the way to somethin
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 35: living by the church (search)
ded me of De Goncourt's saying, After all, every political discussion comes back to this: I am better than you (Je suis meilleur que vous). It is much the same with the comparison of religions. For myself, I never should be led to become a Roman Catholic, as many are led, by the dignity and beauty of the ritual; because even that is tame and dull compared with the impressiveness of the Greek Church, even as one sees it in Paris, with its stately, melodious, black-bearded priests, its pewless onscious juggling with our own minds. I invariably find that the ablest of the younger converts from the Roman Catholic Church--who are numerous, as are the converts in the other direction — give this as the essential ground of their change. And I also find that the very able Roman Catholic newspaper which I read every week, while prompt to answer — and usually with success-all the superficial arguments against the church, keeps absolutely silent as to this vital and final obstacle. 18
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