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The latest via Queenstown. It is stated that the Pope is more than ever resolved not to quit Rome. It is reported that the Southern soldiers of the garrison of Monderi have protested against Cialdini's letter to Garibaldi, and that arrests had been made in consequence. Turin, Thursday.--There has been a perfect reconciliation between Garibaldi, Count Cavour and Gen. Cialdini.
f Annapolis. He has not selected his staff yet. Arrival of the Arabia at Halifax. Halifax, June 10. --The steamer Arabia, from Liverpool on the 1st and Queenstown on the 2d, has arrived here. The steamer North America had put into Queenstown on the 1st with her screw damaged. The Africa arrived out on the 2d. Parliamentary proceedings had been unimportant. In the House of Lords a debate took place on the expediency of encouraging cotton cultivation in India. Count Cavour has been dangerously ill, but at the latest date he was better. Prince Gortechakoff, Governor of Poland, to dead. The Americans in Paris had held a meeting in favor of the Union. Col. Fremont, Ministers Dayton, Clay and Burlingame were among the speakers. Mr. Dayton said that since his arrival in Paris he could detect no unfriendly feeling on the part of Franch citizen would be found among the privateers being sent out by the Seceders. He expressed the conviction that the
It is said that the Emperor will send an aide-de-camp to represent him at the funeral of Count Cavour, and it is also reported that Prince Napoleon will be present. The Paris correspondent of the London Her aid argues that Italian independence will be buried in Count Cavour's grave, and the peninsula become a mere dependency of France. Prince Napoleon has embarked for Spain. Italy. Count Cavour died on the 6th instant. The event has caused a profound sensation. On the evening preceding his death his state became so alarming that great emotion was felt by the people. A --At the re-opening of the Chamber of Deputies to-day the President announced the death of Count Cavour, amid the expressions of profound grief on the part of the Assembly. He looks of the great loss that Italy had sustained, and described the signal services rendered by Count Cavour. Signor Rilez then said the Chamber should participate in the Italian national mourning by suspending the
Count Cavour and the Mortara case. --The Secretary of the Universal Israelite Alliance, of London, has received the following letter from Count Cavour: Turin, Oct. 3, 1860. Sir: I have received the letter which you have addressed me in the name of the Society of the Universal Israelite Alliance, soliciting the aidCount Cavour: Turin, Oct. 3, 1860. Sir: I have received the letter which you have addressed me in the name of the Society of the Universal Israelite Alliance, soliciting the aid of the King's government in the steps which the father of the young Mortara is taking in order to recover his child from the convent in which he is at present retained. Persuaded of the justice of M. Mortara's demands, I have the honor to assure you, sir, that the King's government will do all in its power that this child, in whsure you, sir, that the King's government will do all in its power that this child, in whom the public opinion of Europe is so strongly interested, may be restored to his family. Be good enough I beg you, to acquaint the members of the Jewish Society of these intentions of the government of the King, and receive, &c. Cavour.
Count Cavour. The Zurich correspondent of the New York Journal of Commerce refers to the emphatic declaration of Count Cavour before the Sardinian Parliament, that neither in any public act, nor in any private negotiation, nor in any conference or convention, was a demand or even an allusion ever made that Piedmont should beCount Cavour before the Sardinian Parliament, that neither in any public act, nor in any private negotiation, nor in any conference or convention, was a demand or even an allusion ever made that Piedmont should be required to cede a foot's breadth of Italian territory. This declaration does not shed any new light on the much talked of matter of another cession to France. Count Cavour, says the correspondent, like all diplomatists, knows how to disguise truth; his assurances are not worth a straw. Last year he gave just as positive assurf Italian territory. This declaration does not shed any new light on the much talked of matter of another cession to France. Count Cavour, says the correspondent, like all diplomatists, knows how to disguise truth; his assurances are not worth a straw. Last year he gave just as positive assurances in regard to Nice and Savoy.
A Portrait of count Cavour. --Count Cavour has so far recovered from his late attack as to be able to leave his bed and bedroom, and is expected to transact business in his manifold offices this very morning. His late complaint, for which he has been twice bled, was, happily, not of the apoplectic nature which had somewhat alarmed his friends on former occasions. It was merely an inflammation of the digestive organs. There is no doubt, however, that his strong health threatens to give wCount Cavour has so far recovered from his late attack as to be able to leave his bed and bedroom, and is expected to transact business in his manifold offices this very morning. His late complaint, for which he has been twice bled, was, happily, not of the apoplectic nature which had somewhat alarmed his friends on former occasions. It was merely an inflammation of the digestive organs. There is no doubt, however, that his strong health threatens to give way before his intense incessant occupation, strong appetite, luxurious living, plethoric habits, and want of bodily exercise. He is always up and at work at five o'clock in the morning. From nine to half-past 6 in the afternoon he directs all the business in his own departments, and takes a general survey of those of his more helpless colleagues. --Then follows dinner, his only meal, I believe, in the twenty-four hours, and, I am told, none of the lightest. He uses no carriage, but a walk fro
Affairs in Italy ! The death of Cavour has cast an ominous cloud over the brightening morning of the Italian cause. The conviction is gaining ground that henceforth the King of Sardinia will be reduced to the condition of a Satrap of the great king at Paris. Beautiful Italy! A doom of woe has that fatal gift of beauty been. Still, as for six centuries, she is to be the handmaid of foreign masters, the Briscoe of contending chiefs, with no more design on the part of Agamemnon than of Actrian Kaiser to Napoleon III., she will at all events have a master whom she will not blush to own. The heavy, soulless Austrian despotism will gradually give way before an influence which, while pervading and powerful as the atmosphere, will press as lightly and imperceptibly upon those whom it surrounds. The King of Sardinia will receive some new dominions from his suzerain at Paris, which will reconcile him to the policy that he must hereafter receive from Louis Napoleon instead of Cavour.
Causes of Count Cavour's death. --The London correspondence of the New York Post writes: No event for a long time has occasioned so great a shock in London as the death of Cavour, and our medical men say that naturally we had a right to coCavour, and our medical men say that naturally we had a right to consider it an improbable event. Cavour was a man whose personal appearance, as well as political genius, had a very English aspect. He was of a full habit of body not corpulent, but stout, and while I altogether doubt the stories about the freedom oCavour was a man whose personal appearance, as well as political genius, had a very English aspect. He was of a full habit of body not corpulent, but stout, and while I altogether doubt the stories about the freedom of his life with the ridiculous exaggerations that have been hazarded by some idlers in Parliament, I have no doubt that he paid his cook a very good salary, had the best of cellars, and could appreciate what came to the table of one of the wealthiest is here supposed to be the exhaustion consequent on over bleeding. The Tarin "Opinione" affirms that the mind of Count Cavour was perfectly composed when he died, and says that in his delirious moments he frequently gave utterance to the words,
to the budget by a vote of 242 against 5 M. Thouvenel had addressed a courteous letter to the Turen Cabinet expressing the deepest regret at the death of Count Cavour The silence of the French Legislature on the subject attracted considerable attention. Italy. The new Ministry had taken the oath of allegiance. Lombardy. Baron Ricasolf, in announcing the formation of the new Ministry, said that none had lost their faith in the destiny of Italy. The confessor of Cavour had arrived at Rome, the bearer of a message from the deceased Minister to the Pope. Disturbances had taken place at Villetrie and Amelia. The Liberals at Rome had adopted a sign of mourning for Cavour. The Pope was seriously ill. Austria. In the Hungarian Chamber of Deputies, on the 14th instant, the address to the Emperor having been revised it was finally agreed to. Spain. The Spanish journals publish advices from St. Domingo that tranquility and enthusi
The recognition of the kingdom of Italy by France is an accomplished fact. It is said that it was a stormy meeting at the Council of State when the Emperor announced his intention to recognize the kingdom of Italy. The Paris Union, an ultramontane paper, says that France will recognize a work of brigandage, violence and hypocrisy. Whatever artful terms may be used, this recognition implies necessarily the end of the Pope's temporal power. The funeral dirge in honor of the late Count Cavour was celebrated on the 17th in the Madeline, in the presence of a large concourse of people. Judgment has been pronounced in the affairs of the secret political society, headed by Blanqui. Blanqui has been condemned to four years imprisonment, and interdiction of civil rights for five years afterwards. Other parties implicated were sentenced to shorter terms of imprisonment. Paris papers represent that the Government had obtained an immense majority in the elections of the memb
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