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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
rt, but think the former very probable. I have no means of hearing or knowing anything that is going on till it is made public. I never go to City Point, and Grant does not come here, so that I am not au courant des affaires. Headquarters army of the Potomac, November 15, 1864. I am very glad Bishop Odenheimer was so kind as to visit you and talk to Sergeant, and am truly happy to hear dear Sergeant proposes to make public what I felt sure was the case, that he is a sincere and good Christian. With such a life of devotion to duty, and freedom from all the faults that youth is liable to, it needed for me no more evidence to feel satisfied that my dear boy was in the right path as far as human infirmity admitted. I hear from City Point this evening that McClellan's resignation has been accepted, and that Sheridan has been appointed a major general in the regular army. It is also reported that General Canby, commanding in Louisiana, has been mortally wounded whilst going up R
delegate favorable to the Union, is among the many happy fruits of firmness of purpose, efficiency of action, and integrity of mission. I believe, indeed, that it will not require a personal interchange of views, as suggested in your despatch, to bring our minds in accordance; a simple statement of the facts will suffice. But I am to act hereafter, it may be, in an enemy's country, among a servile population, when the question may arise, as it has not yet arisen, as well in a moral and Christian, as in a political and military point of view. What shall I do? Will your Excellency bear with me a moment while this question is discussed? I appreciate fully your Excellency's suggestion as to the inherent weakness of the rebels, arising from the preponderance of their servile population. The question, then, is — In what manner shall we take advantage of that weakness? By allowing, and of course arming, that population to rise upon the defenceless women and children of the country
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
H ). Operations against Shelby September 22-October 26. Scout from Houston to Jack's Fork November 4-9, 1863 (Detachment). Scouts from Houston December 9-19. Ordered from Springfield to Rolling Prairie February 6, 1864. Duty in Christian, Douglass, Wright, Dade and Stone Counties till July, 1864. Scout from Yellville to Buffalo River March 13-26. Operations in Southwest Missouri July 18-23 and August 1-28. Skirmish Polk County August 28. Operations against Price's ier 15-18. Operations against Shelby September 22-October 26. Oregon (or Bowers' Mill) October 4. Greenfield October 5. Stockton October 5 (Detachment). Operations in Northern Arkansas December, 1863, to February, 1864. Duty in Christian, Douglass and Stone Counties till July. Scouts near Neosho and Carthage May 18-23. At Mount Vernon May. Skirmish near White Hare June 15. Scout from Mount Vernon June 19-25. Operations in Southwest Missouri July 18-23 and August
hat politics do not necessarily debase a man in two years. I hope the office may do as much for you as for your noble and generous colleague. Mr. Sumner's next senatorial effort, Feb. 23, 1855, was an earnest speech, during which he was frequently interrupted by Messrs. Rusk and Butler, on the repeal of the Fugitive-Slave Act. In the course of his remarks, he declared again his plan of emancipation to be, not a political revolution, but the awakening of an enlightened, generous, human, Christian, public opinion, which should blast with contempt, indignation, and abhorrence, all who, in whatever form, or under whatever name, undertake to be agents in enslaving a fellow-man. At the close of his speech, Mr. Butler said, I will ask the gentleman one question: If it devolved upon him as a representative of Massachusetts, all federal laws being put out of the way, would he recommend any law for the delivery of a fugitive slave under the constitution of the United States? never! Mr.
tes to A. W. Campbell, of Wheeling, Va., inclosing an order passed by the Executive Council, loaning that city two thousand muskets. He writes to William Robinson, of Baltimore, Md.,— I have gratefully received, and desire cordially to acknowledge your very kind letter, concerning the fate and last days of poor Needham, of Lawrence, Mass. Allow me also to render to you my thanks in behalf of those most nearly related to the young man, as well as in behalf of all my people, for your Christian, brotherly conduct towards the strangers who fell in your way, rendering the offices of a good Samaritan. I have sent a copy of your letter to the Mayor of Lawrence, who will send it to the Needham family. I beg leave to add the assurances of my personal respect, and the hope that I may yet see you in Boston. He writes to Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury:— I have consulted with the representatives of many of our principal banking institutions, and with our leading p
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
to form your thoughts, words, and actions by its wise and holy precepts, is my best wish and most earnest prayer to Him in whose care I leave you. Amen. From your affectionate father, April 2, 1857. John Brown. This is dated two years ago; but the principles which dictated it were permanent. Almost on the eve of his last battle, October 1, 1859, he wrote home to his daughter Anne, in a letter which I saw, Anne, I want you first of all to become a sincere, humble, and consistent Christian--and then [this is characteristic] to acquire good and efficient business habits. Save this, to remember your father by, Anne. God Almighty bless and save you all. John Brown's orthodoxy. John Brown is almost the only radical abolitionist I have ever known who was not more or less radical in religious matters also. His theology was Puritan, like his practice; and accustomed as we now are to see Puritan doctrines and Puritan virtues separately exhibited, it seems quite strange to b
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
to form your thoughts, words, and actions by its wise and holy precepts, is my best wish and most earnest prayer to Him in whose care I leave you. Amen. From your affectionate father, April 2, 1857. John Brown. This is dated two years ago; but the principles which dictated it were permanent. Almost on the eve of his last battle, October 1, 1859, he wrote home to his daughter Anne, in a letter which I saw, Anne, I want you first of all to become a sincere, humble, and consistent Christian--and then [this is characteristic] to acquire good and efficient business habits. Save this, to remember your father by, Anne. God Almighty bless and save you all. John Brown's orthodoxy. John Brown is almost the only radical abolitionist I have ever known who was not more or less radical in religious matters also. His theology was Puritan, like his practice; and accustomed as we now are to see Puritan doctrines and Puritan virtues separately exhibited, it seems quite strange to b
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 8: the conquering pen. (search)
ect of the gallows. Men cannot imprison, or chain, or hang the soul. I go joyfully in behalf of millions that have no rights that this great and glorious, this Christian Republic is bound to respect. Strange change in morals, political as well as Christian, since 1776! I look forward to other changes to take place in God's goodChristian, since 1776! I look forward to other changes to take place in God's good time, fully believing that the fashion of this world passeth away. Farewell. May God abundantly bless you all! Your friend, John Brown. Letter to his son Jason. Charlestown, Jefferson Co., Va., Nov. 22, 1859 Dear Children: Your most welcome letters of the 16th inst. I have just received, and I bless God thaear a close. You may wonder, are there no ministers of the gospel here? I answer, No. There are no ministers of Christ here. These ministers who profess to be Christian, and hold slaves or advocate slavery, I cannot abide them. My knees will not bend in prayer with them while their hands are stained with the blood of souls. Th
John Jay Chapman, William Lloyd Garrison, Chapter 8: the Rynders mob (search)
f the New Testament. He went on to examine the popular tests of religion, and to show their defectiveness. In so doing, his manner was grave and dignified. There was no bitterness, no levity. His manner of speaking was simple, clerical, and Christian. His subject was, substantially, that we have, over and over again, in all the pulpits of the land --the inconsistency of our profession and practice — although not with the same application. . . . Mr. Garrison said great importance was attachood, with folded arms, waiting for Mr. Garrison to conclude, which soon he did — offering a resolution in these terms: Resolved, That the Anti-slavery movement, instead of being infidel, in an evil sense (as is falsely alleged), is truly Christian, in the primitive meaning of that term, and the special embodiment in this country of whatever is loyal to God and benevolent to man; and that, in view of the palpable enormity of slavery-of the religious and political professions of the people
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2, Chapter 22: Heathen Chinee. (search)
hen the mud was fifteen inches deep in Montgomery Street, a Yellow chap in fur tippet and purple satin gown, was crossing over the road by a plank, when one of our worthy citizens, seeing how nicely he was dressed, more like a lady than a tradesman, ran on the plank to meet him, and, when the fellow stopped and stared, just gave him a little jerk, and whisked him, with a waggish laugh, into the bed of slush. Ha ha! You should have seen the crowd of people mocking the impudent Heathen Chinee as he picked himself up in his soiled tippet and satin gown! Did any one in the crowd stand drinks all round? Well, no; that Heathen Chinee rather turned the laugh aside. Ay; how was that? No White man can conceive the impudence of these Chinese. Moon-face picked himself up, shook off a little of the mire, and, looking mildly at our worthy citizen, curtseyed like a girl, saying to him, in a voice that every one standing round could hear: You Christian: me Heathen: good-bye.
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