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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cleveland (search)
Cleveland The most important port of Ohio, on Lake Erie, was named after (Gen. Moses Cleaveland, director of the Connecticut Land Company, who arrived at the present site of Cleveland, July 22, 1796, and began the settlement at the mouth of Cuyahoga River. In 1800 the population was only 7; in 1810 it was 57; 1820, 150; 1830, 1,075; 1840, 6,071; 1850, 17,034. In 1854, Ohio City, on the opposite bank of the river, was united with Cleveland, and in 1860 the population of the united cities was 43,838; in 1870. 92,829; 1880, 159,404; 1890, 261.353; 1900, 381,768.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cleveland, Grover 1837- (search)
Cleveland, Grover 1837- Twenty-second and twenty-fourth President of the United States, from 1885 to 1889, and from 1893 to 1897; Democrat; born in Caldwell, Essex co., N. J., March 18, 1837. Arnor of New York in 1882. One of the successful nominees in this tidal-wave Democratic year, Mr. Cleveland received the phenomenal majority of 192,000, and entered office in January, 1883. His admiggle, over James G. Blaine, and was inaugurated March 4, 1885 (see cabinet, President's). President Cleveland, in his famous message to Congress on the surplus and the tariff in December, 1887, forcehome at Princeton, N. J. Tariff message of 1887. During both of his administrations President Cleveland gave much thought to the question of the tariff, and in several of his messages to Congre the occasion for a future communication. The Venezuela boundary. On Dec. 17, 1895, President Cleveland sent the following message to Congress concerning the dispute between Great Britain and V
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colman, Norman J. (search)
Colman, Norman J. Agriculturalist; born near Richfield Springs, N. Y., in 1827; began the practice of law in New Albany, Ind., and the editing of an agricultural paper in St. Louis, Mo., in 1871. He was elected lieutenant-governor as a Democrat in 1874, and was appointed by President Cleveland United States Commissioner of Agriculture in 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbian Exposition. (search)
reau of Agriculture, the Departments of Ethnology, Fish and Fisheries, Mines and Mining, Liberal Arts, Publicity and Promotion, Fine Arts, Machinery, Manufactures, Electricity, Horticulture, Floriculture and the Woman's Department, besides the Bureau of Transportation and the Department of Foreign Affairs. The total estimated expenditure for the fair was $26,000,000. The imposing naval parade in New York Harbor proved to be an event of surpassing interest. The fair was opened by President Cleveland; a poem, Prophecy, by William A. Croffut, was read, and the usual initiatory exercises occurred, but several weeks elapsed before all the exhibits were in place. Some special features of interest were the various congresses which assembled at Chicago. Aside from religious and educational reunions, there was a literary congress in July, which discussed copyright and general literature; the Jews, Roman Catholics, negroes, and engineers held special congresses. In the autumn a monster
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Folger, Charles James 1818-1884 (search)
bar in Albany in 1839; and returned to Geneva to practise in 1840. He was judge of the court of common pleas in Ontario county in 1843-46, and was county judge in 1852– Charles James Folger. 56. Shortly after the formation of the Republican party he left the Democrats and joined the new organization. He served as State Senator in 1861-69; for four years of that period he was president pro tem., and during the whole period was chairman of the judiciary committee. In 1869-70 he was United States assistant treasurer in New York City; in 1871 was elected associate judge of the New York Court of Appeals; and in 1880 became chief-justice. In November of the latter year he was re-elected to the Court of Appeals, but resigned in 1881 to accept the office of Secretary of the United States Treasury. In 1882 he was the Republican candidate for governor of New York, but was defeated by Grover Cleveland, who had a majority of nearly 200,000 votes. He died in Geneva, N. Y., Sept. 4, 188
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fuller, Melville Weston 1833- (search)
Fuller, Melville Weston 1833- Jurist; born in Augusta, Me., Feb. 11, 1833; graduated at Bowdoin College, in 1853; became a lawyer in his native city; and soon afterwards removed to Chicago, Melville Weston Fuller. where he built up an important practice. He was a member of the legislature, and a delegate to several Democratic national conventions. In 1888 he was appointed by President Cleveland chief-justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Garland, Augustus Hill -1899 (search)
Garland, Augustus Hill -1899 Born in Tipton county, Tenn., June 11, 1832; was admitted to the bar of Arkansas in 1853, to which State his parents had removed when he was a child. He opposed the secession of his State, but accepted the same and was sent as delegate to the Provisional Congress at Montgomery, Ala., in 1861. He was also elected to the first Confederate Congress, and afterwards to the Confederate Senate. In 1867 he was elected United States Senator, but was not allowed to take his seat; in 1876 was again elected in place of Powell Clayton, and was admitted. He remained in the Senate until March, 1885, when he resigned to take the post of Attorney-General of the United States, offered him by President Cleveland. He resumed practice in 1889, and died in court, in Washington, D. C., Jan. 26, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Great Lakes and the Navy, the. (search)
thoroughly investigating the canal question, and submitted their report to the President Jan. 8, 1897. In this letter transmitting the report to Congress, President Cleveland says: The advantages of a direct and unbroken water transportation of the products of our Western States and Territories from a convenient point of sh work on the Manchester ship canal, the dimensions of which are, length, 30 1/2 miles; width at top, 172 feet; width at bottom, 120 feet; depth, 26 feet. President Cleveland's prediction, therefore, that the feasibility of deep-water transportation from the Great Lakes to the ocean will not long escape American enterprise, bids e citizens of the Middle West show a lively interest in naval affairs, and are taking a prominent part in naval militia work. Chicago, Saginaw, Detroit, Toledo, Cleveland, and Rochester have large, flourishing naval militia organizations. The Detroit organization recently took the old Yantic from Montreal to Detroit without eithe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gresham, Walter Quinton (search)
and began the practice of law. He had served in the legislature when the Civil War broke out. As colonel of the 52d Indiana Volunteers he served creditably in the Western army. After the war he was defeated as Republican candidate for Congressman, and from 1869 to 1882 held the post of United States district judge in Indiana. In President Arthur's administration Gresham was Postmaster-General from 1882 to 1884, and Secretary of the Treasury from September to December, 1884. He then became United States circuit judge, and held that post until 1893. Meanwhile he was in 1888 a prominent candidate for the Republican nomination to the Presidency, and in 1892 he declined the Populist invitation to stand for the same office. His views on public questions had somewhat changed, so that his appointment by President Cleveland to Waltir Quinton Gresham. the office of Secretary of State was not entirely a surprise. He held this office at the time of his death, in Washington, May 28, 1895.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harrison, Benjamin 1740-1791 (search)
sidency on the eighth ballot. At the election in November he was chosen President, receiving 233 electoral votes to Grover Cleveland's 168. The popular vote was 5,440,216 for Harrison, and 5,538,233 for Cleveland (see cabinet, President's). In 1892Cleveland (see cabinet, President's). In 1892 both he and Mr. Cleveland were renominated, and he was defeated by the latter, receiving 145 electoral and 5,176,108 popular votes against 277 electoral and 5,556,918 popular votes for Mr. Cleveland. In 1898 he became chief counsel for VenezuelMr. Cleveland were renominated, and he was defeated by the latter, receiving 145 electoral and 5,176,108 popular votes against 277 electoral and 5,556,918 popular votes for Mr. Cleveland. In 1898 he became chief counsel for Venezuela (q. v.) in the boundary dispute between that country and Great Britain, and in 1899 an American member of The Hague Arbitration Commission. He died in Indianapolis, Ind., March 13, 1901. See annexed Territory, status of. Inaugural Address>heaMr. Cleveland. In 1898 he became chief counsel for Venezuela (q. v.) in the boundary dispute between that country and Great Britain, and in 1899 an American member of The Hague Arbitration Commission. He died in Indianapolis, Ind., March 13, 1901. See annexed Territory, status of. Inaugural Address>head> On March 4, 1889, President Harrison delivered the following inaugural address: Fellow-citizens.—There is no constitutional or legal requirement that the President shall take the oath of office in the presence of the people, but there is
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