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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
General Jubal A. Early. Memorial address by Hon. John W. Daniel, before the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, at the annual meeting held at Richmond, Va., December 13, 1894. Prayer, which I could not regard as less than a command, I am here to speak to you of Lieutenant-General Jubal Anderson Early; one of the great soldiers of history, second to none that ever lived in valor f the soldier's name is the only reward that war can bestow that is worthy to be cherished. General Early not only made history, he preserved history and wrote history, and he had that prophetic formy question, Who next? None, I will confidently say, that you will be willing to rank above Jubal A. Early. Zzzsecond to Lee and Jackson. I have said, and I have heard it said by one of the bes Whereas, since the last meeting of this Association, death has claimed one honored comrade, Jubal A. Early, founder of this Society and Lieutenant-General in the Provisional Army of the Confederate S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
e Prisoners; hardships of; placed under Confederate fire, 127. Confederate States, Medical officers of, 165. Confederate Supplies, Want of, 90. Constitution, The, Atlanta, Ga., cited, 122. Constitution of the U. S. nullified, 27. Kent and Rawle on the, 83. Cox, Mrs., Lucy Ann, a Confederate heroine, 54. Courier, Bristol, Va., cited, 127. Crawford, Hon W. H., 83. Crouch, Nicholas M., 377. Cullingworth, Col., Wm. H., 349. Daniel, Hon. John W. His able tribute to Gen. Jubal A. Early, 288. Delaware, Fort, Prisoners at, 144. De Renne, Mrs., Mary. Her admirable collection of Confederate Memorials, 389. Dispatch, The, Richmond, Va., cited, 20, 24, 48, 69, 281, 336. Dixon, 21st Alabama Infantry, Lieut. His heroic self-sacrifice, 80. Early, Gen Jubal A. Memorial Address by Hon. John W. Daniel, 281; campaigns of discussed, 285; his losses compared with those of Sheridan, 314; Gen. Lee's faith in, 317; compared with English Commanders, 321; personal and ma
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
, April 6, 1865. Command—Commanding Brigade of Cavalry, Army of Northern Virginia. Jubal Anderson Early, colonel, Twenty-fourth Virginia Regiment, Infantry, May, 1861; brigadier-general, July 2ifty-second and Fifty-eighth Virginia Regiments (formerly Pegram's brigade); Ramseur's Division, Early's corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Lunsford Lindsay Lomax, colonel Eleventh Virginia Cavalryeptember 21, 1863; died at Charlottesville, Va., April—, 1891. Commands—Commanding artillery, Early's Corps, June 13 to August 30, 1864; commanding artillery, Ewell's Corps, Army of Northern Virgi, Forty-ninth, Fifty-second and Fifty-eighth Regiments, Virginia Infantry. A. N. Va.; commanding Early's Division, A. N. Va. John Clifford Pemberton, lieutenant-colonel corps of artillery, C. S. A of the Thirteenth, Forty-ninth, Fifty-second, Fifty-eighth and Thirty-first Virginia Regiments, Early's Division, A. N. V. Walter Husted Stevens, major, corps of engineers, C. S. A.——, tober 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
daring most essential to the cavalry officer. Guarding Earlys left. On September 3, 1864, he took command of his cavalry brigade (consisting of the Fifth, Sixth and Eighth Virginia Regirents) in Fitz Lee's division, then operating with General Early, in the Valley of Virginia. It was his brigade, with him at the head of it, which guarded the left flank of Early's army in the battle of Winchester and repulsed the Union cavalry in the Luray valley. His brigade, with him at the head of itEarly's army in the battle of Winchester and repulsed the Union cavalry in the Luray valley. His brigade, with him at the head of it, led the advance of Gordon's division, in the attack upon Sheridan at Cedar Creek. Crossing the north fork of the Shenandoah, below Cedar Creek, by a swift dash with picked men, he fell upon and captured the enemy's pickets and out posts without firing a shot. The enemy's camp was taken so completely by surprise that two divisions of Sheridan's corps, their camp, with all its equipment, wagons, horses, guns, fell an easy prey to Gordon's foot cavalry, which followed. Gordon, in his publishe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company G, Twenty-Fourth Virginia Infantry. From the Richmond Dispatch, June 17, 1901. (search)
nded at Fredericksburg and died. Levi V. Vermillion, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. Crawford Vest, killed at Boonsborough, Md., 1863. John Wright, died in 1861. H. G. White, wounded at Drewry's Bluff, May 16, 1864; living. H. M. White, living. A. J. Whitteker, wounded at Williamsburg and died since the war. William M. Whitaker, living. This company was made up in Mercer county, Va., (now West Virginia), and was the first company from the county. It was continued as a part of the Twenty-fourth Virginia Regiment throughout the war, and belonged to the First Brigade of the First Division, commanded by General George E. Pickett, of Longstreet's Corps. The brigade was commanded by various brigadier-generals as follows: J. A. Early, S. P. Garland, J. L. Kemper, and W. R. (Buck) Terry. The company participated in several battles, and lost from death in battle, death from wounds and disease, about 35 per cent. of its members. H. G. White, A Member of the Company.
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