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hus, while the Rebels concentrated, from Richmond on the south to Winchester on the north, all their available strength upon Manassas, and had it in hand before the close of the battle, McDowell had but little more than a third of our corresponding forces wherewith to oppose it — he acting on the offensive. In other words. we fought with 35,000 men, a battle in which we might and should have had 75,000. IV The Rebels were kept thoroughly acquainted by their confederates, left by Davis, Floyd, etc., in our service, with everything that took place or was meditated Mr. Julius Bing, a German by birth but British by naturalization, who was on the battlefield as a spectator, and was there taken prisoner, and conducted next morning to Beauregard's Headquarters, whence he was sent to Richmond, and who seems to have had the faculty of making himself agreeable to either side, stated, after his return, that among the men he met at Beauregard's Headquarters, at the Junction, was Col. Jor
eports, etc., 597. Bendix, Col., (Union,) 529; 530. Benham, Gen., 525; on Floyd's retreat, 526. Benning, Henry L., in Dem. Convention, 315. Benton, Col. Fort Pickens besieged, 412. Flour, annual product of, by 8th census, 22. Floyd, John, Governor of Va., sympathizes with the Nullifiers, 100. Floyd, John B.Floyd, John B., his opinion on the Cuba question, 268; his disposition of the Federal forces in Texas, 840; resigns his post of Secretary War; schedule of his order for transfer oans, Gen., wins the battle of Rich Mountain, 522; captures Pegram, 523; attacks Floyd at Carnifex Ferry, 525; attempts to surprise the Rebels at Gauley Mount, 526. n, 290; 293: killed at Cheat Mountain, 526. Washington City, 407 ; frauds of Floyd and Baily at, 410-11; arrival of Col. Hayne at, 412; inauguration of President wn, 293; 294; 329; commands the Rebels in West Virginia, 522; 524; outranked by Floyd, etc., 525. Wisconsin, 215; 300; 301. Wistar, Lieut.-Col., at Ball's Bluff,
hen, soon after Mr. Lincoln's election, but months prior to his inauguration, Gen. David E. Twiggs was dispatched by Secretary Floyd from New Orleans to San Antonio, and assigned to the command of the department, it was doubtless understood between s was to betray this entire force, or so much of it as possible, into the hands of the yet undeveloped traitors with whom Floyd was secretly in league. Twiggs's age and infirmities had for some time excused him from active service, until this ungra fellow-traitors who had cast off all disguise, were shamefully violated. Col. C. A. Waite, who, after the withdrawal of Floyd from tho Cabinet, had been sent down to supersede Twiggs in his command, reached San Antonio the morning after the capituch a substitution as they desired; and thus Col. Loring, a North Carolinian, deep in their counsels, had been sent out by Floyd, in the Spring of 1860, to take command of the department of New Mexico, while Col. G. B. Crittenden, a Kentuckian, of li
an. 18. until the arrival Feb. 13. of Gen. John B. Floyd, Of Virginia. when the number of its return of the gunboats in fighting condition. Floyd, however, not concurring in that view of the mndisputed, a surrender became inevitable. Yet Floyd, the sunset of whose career as Secretary of Wa more popular with Kentucky Unionists than was Floyd with those of the Free States--presented no such obstacle. Floyd, therefore, turned the command over to Pillow, who passed it to Buckner, whose g arrived a little before daylight from above, Floyd filled them with his soldiers, especially thos appear to have over 50 men on board, and that Floyd took away about 1,500; but this is probably an— a rear-guard being left in Nashville under Gen. Floyd, who had arrived from Donelson, to secure ths. It was with the greatest difficulty that Gen. Floyd could restore order and get his martial law the cowardly and ravenous mob of Nashville. Gen. Floyd and Col. Forrest exhibited extraordinary ene[1 more...]
ida, contributions to the Confederate army in, 459; Gen. Truman Seymour's expedition to, 529. Florida, the and the Alabama Southern corsairs built and fitted out in England and flying British colors, 643; depredations and capture of, 644-5. Floyd, Gen. John B., 17; 18; 19; 47; would not surrender, 50. Foote, (Com. A. H., at Fort Henry, 45; 46-7; at Fort Donelson, 48-9; up the Cumberland, 53; at Columbus, Ky., 54; at Island No.10, 55; bombards Fort Pillow, 56. Ford, Col. T. H., on Ma routs Sturgis at Guntown, 621; assails Johnsonville, Tenn., 679. Fort De Russy, captured by A. J. Smith, 537. Fort Donelson, Tenn., map of, 46; invested by Grant, 47; Rebels attempt to cut their way out, 48-9; sufferings of the troops, 49; Floyd and Forrest escape, 50; the surrender, 50; losses sustained at, 51. Fort Fisher, N. G., Gen. Terry assaults and captures, 713. Fort Henry, Tenn., defenses of, 45; attacked by Gen. Grant, 45; map of, 46; captured, 46-7. Fort Hindman, Ark.
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter3 (search)
to the beginning of spring, the condition of the country south of the Potomac and east of the Blue Ridge would have made them extremely difficult-indeed, almost impossible. The quantity of rain that fell, and of snow, always melting quickly, made a depth of mud rarely equaled. The Confederate troops fought bravely and well wherever they encountered those of the United States, in 1861. At Bethel, under Magruder and D. H. Hill; at Oakhill, under Price and McCulloch; on the Gauley, under Floyd; on the Greenbrier, under H. R. Jackson; on Santa Rosa Island, under R. H. Anderson; at Belmont, under Polk and Pillow; on the Alleghany, under Edward Johnson, and at Chastenallah, under McIntosh. On all these occasions they were superior to their adversaries, from greater zeal and more familiarity with the use of fire-arms. The thorough system of instruction introduced into the United States army gradually established equality in the use of fire-arms, and our greater zeal finally encounte
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 13 (search)
sment laws. no want of zeal or patriotism. refutation of charges against Secretary Floyd. facts of the case. deficiency of small arms at the South. Much has any public man of the United States ever suffered — the accusation against John B. Floyd, of Virginia, that while Secretary of War he had all the public arms removese, Mr. Stanton, of Ohio. The report of that committee completely exonerated Mr. Floyd, and refuted the calumny. Yet it continued to be circulated and believed-whid arms were made. To make room there for the new arms as they were finished, Mr. Floyd ordered the removal of about a hundred and five thousand muskets The chief o report on the subject, states that but sixty thousand of the arms ordered by Mr. Floyd to be sent to the South were actually removed. and ten thousand rifles, to ear that several Southern States refused or neglected to take their portions. Mr. Floyd's orders, as I have said, were given before secession had been thought of, or
ular army. 1. Samuel Cooper, Va., Adj.-Gen. U. S. A. 2. Jos. E. Johnson, Va., Q.-M.-Gen. U. S. A. 3. Robt. E. Lee, Va., Col. of Cavalry U. S. A. Major-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. David E. Twiggs, Ga., Brig.-Gen. U. S. A. 2. Leonidas Polk, La., Episcopal Bishop of La. Brigadier-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. P. T. G. Beauregard, Capt. Engs. U. S. A. 2. Braxton Bragg, La., Capt. Art. U. S. A. 3. M. L. Bonham, S. C., Congressman from S. C. 4. John B. Floyd, Va., U. S. Sec. of War. 5. Ben. McCullough, Texas, Maj. Texas Rangers. 6. Wm. H. T. Walker, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Inft. U. S. A. 7. Henry A. Wise, Va., late Gov. of Va. 8. H. R. Jackson, Ga., late Minister to Austria. 9. Barnard E. Bee, S. C., Capt. Inft. U. S. A. 10. Nathan G. Evans, S. C., Major Inft. U. S. A. 11. John B. Magruder,, Va., Major Art. U. S. A. 12. Wm. J. Hardee, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Cav. U. S. A. 13. Benj. Huger, S. C., Major Ordnance U. S. A. 14. Robe
Doc. 173 1/2.-U. S. Executive Government, 1857-61. President.--James Buchanan, of Penn. Vice-President.--John C. Breckinridge, of Ky. Secretaries of State.--Lewis Cass, of Michigan; Jeremiah S. Black of Penn., appt. Dec. 17, 1860. Secretary of the Navy.--Isaac Toucey, of Conn. Secretaries of War.--John B. Floyd, of Va.; Joseph Holt, of Ky., appt. Jan. 18, 1861. Secretaries of the Treasury.--Howell Cobb, of Ga.; Philip F. Thomas, of Md., appt. Dec. 12, 1860; John A. Dix, of N. Y., appt. Jan. 11, 1861. Secretary of the Interior.--Jacob Thompson, of Miss. Postmasters-General.--Joseph Holt, of Ky.; Horatio King, of Me., appt. Feb. 12, 1861. Attorneys-General.--Jeremiah S. Black, of Penn.; Edwin M. Stanton, of Penn., appt. Dec. 20, 1860.
One of Floyd's performances.--It will be remembered that Floyd, during his unimpeded career of larceny and treason, found a number of the heaviest guns belonging to the United States which could not be readily shipped to the South, nor put into any other position where they would be unlikely to do that section injury, and that as a last resort he condemned and sold them as old iron. A Patterson, (N. J.) firm bought a number of them for twenty dollars per ton. Upon coining to inspect them ,Floyd, during his unimpeded career of larceny and treason, found a number of the heaviest guns belonging to the United States which could not be readily shipped to the South, nor put into any other position where they would be unlikely to do that section injury, and that as a last resort he condemned and sold them as old iron. A Patterson, (N. J.) firm bought a number of them for twenty dollars per ton. Upon coining to inspect them , they were found worth, as unmanufactured iron alone, three times the price paid for them. Their hardness was such that it was found impossible to break them up for the furnace by the ordinary means, and a few of then were finally wrenched to pieces in a lathe. The remainder were re-purchased for Government yester-day by a commission from the War Department, and found to be sound in every particular.--N. Y. Evening Post, June 20.
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