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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 4: California. 1855-1857. (search)
her committee of citizens, a conciliatory body, was formed to prevent collision if possible, and the newspapers boiled over with vehement vituperation. This second committee was composed of such men as Crockett, Ritchie, Thornton, Bailey Peyton, Foote, Donohue, Kelly, and others, a class of the most intelligent and wealthy men of the city, who earnestly and honestly desired to prevent bloodshed. They also came to me, and I told them that our men were enrolling very fast, and that, when I deemI had made a written communication, and was entitled to a written answer. At that moment several gentlemen of the Conciliation party, who had come up in the same steamer with me, asked for admission and came in. I recall the names of Crockett, Foote, Bailey Peyton, Judge Thornton, Donohue, etc., and the conversation became general, Wool trying to explain away the effect of our misunderstanding, taking good pains not to deny his promise made to me personally on the wharf. I renewed my applica
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 5: California, New York, and Kansas. 1857-1859. (search)
it, a certain note of Green & Purdy for twelve thousand dollars. Early in April, I learned that Spears had collected three thousand seven hundred dollars in money, had appropriated it to his own use, and had pledged another good note taken in part payment of three thousand and fifty-three dollars. He pretended to be insane. I had to make two visits to Downieville on this business, and there made the acquaintance of Mr. Stewart, now a Senator from Nevada. He was married to a daughter of Governor Foote; was living in a small frame-house on the bar just below the town; and his little daughter was playing about the door in the sand. Stewart was then a lawyer in Downieville, in good practice; afterward, by some lucky stroke, became part owner of a valuable silver-mine in Nevada, and is now accounted a millionaire. I managed to save something out of Spears, and more out of his partner Thornton. This affair of Spears ruined him, because his insanity was manifestly feigned. I remained
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
s the season would permit. Most people urged the movement down the Mississippi River; but Generals Polk and Pillow had a large rebel force, with heavy guns in a very strong position, at Columbus, Kentucky, about eighteen miles below Cairo. Commodore Foote had his gunboat fleet at Cairo; and General U. S. Grant, who commanded the district, was collecting a large force at Paducah, Cairo, and Bird's Point. General Halleck had a map on his table, with a large pencil in his hand, and asked, Where ful, and extremely rich in military results; indeed, it was the first real success on our side in the civil war. The movement up the Tennessee began about the 1st of February, and Fort Henry was captured by the joint action of the navy under Commodore Foote, and the land-forces under General Grant, on the 6th of February, 1862. About the same time, General S. R. Curtis had moved forward from Rolla, and, on the 8th of March, defeated the rebels under McCulloch, Van Dorn, and Price, at Pea Ridge
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
and Pillow, had fallen back from Columbus, Kentucky, to Island Number10 and New Madrid. This army had the full cooperation of the gunboat fleet, commanded by Admiral Foote, and was assisted by the high flood of that season, which enabled General Pope, by great skill and industry, to open a canal from a point above Island Number10the rebel army and its available line of supply and retreat. At the very time that we were fighting the bloody battle on the Tennessee River, General Pope and Admiral Foote were bombarding the batteries on Island Number10, and the Kentucky shore abreast of it; and General Pope having crossed over by steamers a part of his army to y from Memphis, by reason of the destruction of the rebel gunboats in the bold and dashing attack by our gunboats under command of Admiral Davis, who had succeeded Foote. This occurred June 7th. Admiral Farragut had also captured New Orleans after the terrible passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip on May 24th, and had ascended t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Navy of the United States (search)
veles142GunboatI.125T. S.b4 Mindoro142GunboatI.125T. S.b4 Restless137Gunboat (converted)I.500S.b8 Shearwater122Gunboat (converted)S......S.b3 Incaa120Gunboat (converted)W.400S.b2 Alvarado100GunboatS.137S.b2 Sandoval100GunboatS.137S.b2 Huntress82Gunboat (converted)Comp......S.b2 Basco42GunboatI.44S.b2 Guardoqui42GunboatI.44S.b2 Urdaneta42GunboatI.44S.b2 b, Estimated. d, Torpedo tubes. Cushing (No. 1)105Torpedo-boatS.1,720T. S.d3 Ericsson (No. 2)120Torpedo-boatS.1,800T. S.d3 Foote (No. 3)142Torpedo-boatS.2,000T. S.d3 Rodgers (No. 4)142Torpedo-boatS.2,000T. S.d3 Winslow (No. 5)142Torpedo-boatS.2,000T. S.d3 Porter (No. 6)165Torpedo-boatS.b3,400T. S.d3 Dupont (No. 7)165Torpedo-boatS.b3,400T. S.d3 Rowan (No. 8)182Torpedo-boatS.3,200T. S.d3 Dahlgren (No. 9)146Torpedo-boatS.4,200T. S.d2 T. A. M. Craven (No 10)146Torpedo-boatS.4,200T. S.d2 Farragut (No. 11)273Torpedo-boatS.5,600T. S.d2 Davis (No. 12)132Torpedo-boatS.1,750T. S.d3 Fox (No. 13)132To
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Omnibus bill, the (search)
o be inexpedient to abolish slavery in the District of Columbia while that institution existed in Maryland, without the consent of the people of the District, and without just compensation to the owners of slaves within the District; that more effectual laws should be made for the restitution of fugitive slaves; and that Congress had no power to prohibit or obstruct the trade in slaves between the several States. Clay spoke eloquently in favor of this plan. Mr. Webster approved it, and Senator Foote, of Mississippi, moved that the whole subject be referred to a committee of thirteen—six Southern members and six Northern members—they to choose the thirteenth. This resolution was adopted April 18; the committee was appointed, and Mr. Clay was made chairman of it. On May 8, Mr. Clay reported a plan of compromise in a series of bills substantially the same as that of Jan. 29. It was called an omnibus bill. Long debates ensued, and on July 31 the whole batch was rejected except the pr
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Senate, United States (search)
ions of the republic. As an example take this: In January, 1830, Mr. Foote, a Senator from Connecticut, offered a resolution instructing theaid in the Senate in the discussion following the introduction of Mr. Foote's modest resolution proposing to inquire whether it would not be flicted on him. In the case of Senators Benton, of Missouri, and Foote, of Mississippi, a special committee was appointed to report. On se sharp personal altercations in the Senate. On that date, while Mr. Foote was speaking in reply to Mr. Benton, the latter started from his seat and moved towards Mr. Foote. Mr. Foote left his seat and took a stand in front of the secretary's table, at the same time drawing and coMr. Foote left his seat and took a stand in front of the secretary's table, at the same time drawing and cocking a revolver. Mr. Benton was led back to his seat by Senators in the midst of great confusion, and Mr. Foote was induced to surrender thMr. Foote was induced to surrender the pistol. The committee reported that the whole scene was most discreditable to the Senate, but recommended no action, expressing the hope
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
20, 1861 Government suspends specie payment......Jan. 1, 1862 Department of North Carolina established, Gen. A. E. Burnside commander......Jan. 7, 1862 Burnside's expedition arrives at Hatteras Inlet, N. C....... Jan. 13, 1862 Engagement at Logan's Cross Roads, or Mill Spring, Ky.......Jan. 19, 1862 Jesse D. Bright, of Indiana, expelled from the Senate on a charge of disloyalty, by 32 to 14......Jan. 20, 1862 Capture of Fort Henry, Tenn., by forces under General Grant and Commodore Foote......Feb. 6, 1862 Battle of Roanoke Island, by troops under command of General Burnside......Feb. 8, 1862 General Grant assigned to command of District of West Tennessee......Feb. 14, 1862 Surrender of Fort Donelson, Tenn., to federal forces under General Grant......Feb. 16, 1862 Nashville, Tenn., occupied by federal forces......Feb. 25, 1862 Congress authorizes $150,000,000 United States notes, the legal-tender bill......Feb. 25, 1862 Battle of Pea Ridge, Ark.......Ma
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Members of the First and Second Congresses of the Confederate States. (search)
QueenSouth CarolinaMember of First Congress. Hon.Wm. Porcher MilesSouth CarolinaMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.Wm. D. SimpsonSouth CarolinaMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.James M. WitherspoonSouth CarolinaMember of Second Congress. Hon.John D. C. AtkinsTennesseeMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.Mich'l W. CluskeyTennesseeMember of Second Congress. Hon.A. S. ColyarTennesseeMember of Second Congress. Hon.David M. CurrinTennesseeMember of First Congress. Hon.Henry S. FooteTennesseeMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.E. L. GardenhierTennesseeMember of First Congress. Hon.Meredith P. GentryTennesseeMember of First Congress. Hon.James B. HeiskellTennesseeMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.George W. JonesTennesseeMember of First Congress. Hon.E. A. KeebleTennesseeMember of Second Congress. Hon.James McCallumTennesseeMember of Second Congress. Hon.Thomas MeneesTennesseeMember of First and Second Congress. Hon.John P. MurrayTennesseeMember of
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
espect and admiration for Mr. Weiss, but I do not like his style. I often wish that his large and noble thoughts were expressed with more simplicity. He reminds me of an anecdote of Mr. Berrien of Georgia. A stranger, who had just been hearing Foote of Mississippi speak in Congress, remarked to Mr. Berrien, Foote has great command of language. On the contrary, replied Berrien, I think language has great command of him. I think scorn of simplicity and directness is the crying sin of writers for Mr. Weiss, but I do not like his style. I often wish that his large and noble thoughts were expressed with more simplicity. He reminds me of an anecdote of Mr. Berrien of Georgia. A stranger, who had just been hearing Foote of Mississippi speak in Congress, remarked to Mr. Berrien, Foote has great command of language. On the contrary, replied Berrien, I think language has great command of him. I think scorn of simplicity and directness is the crying sin of writers of the present day.
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