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Affair of honor cut short. --The Hon. Henry S. Foote, of Tennessee, was on yesterday, just after the adjournment, of Congress, arrested by officer Jenkins, of ant charging him with being about to engage in a duel with Mr. John Mitchell. Mr. Foote was carried before the Mayor, who held him to bail in the sum of five thousance and be of good behavior. The Hon. Charles S. Colyar, of Tennessee, became Mr. Foote's surety. The difficulty between Messrs. Foote and Mitchell is said to hMessrs. Foote and Mitchell is said to have grown out of some editorial strictures in the Richmond Examiner upon Mr. Foote's speech in Congress, last Saturday, upon resolutions introduced by Mr. Staples, oMr. Foote's speech in Congress, last Saturday, upon resolutions introduced by Mr. Staples, of Virginia. Mr. Foote, attributing the obnoxious editorial to Mr. Mitchell, on Monday animadverted upon it from his place in the House of Representatives; and in theMr. Foote, attributing the obnoxious editorial to Mr. Mitchell, on Monday animadverted upon it from his place in the House of Representatives; and in the course of his remarks, made use of some expressions which were deemed personal and offensive to Mr. Mitchell. We have not learned whether there was a warrant i
n was received from the President: "Executive Department," January 13, 1865. "To the House of Representatives."Confederate State of America: "I have just received from the Secretary of War the accompanying report, stating that Hon. Henry S. Foote, a member of the House of Representatives from the State of Tennessee, has been arrested by a military officer, in Northern Virginia, while endeavoring to pass our lines on his way to the enemy's country. As this arrest may involve a queshal at Fredericksburg. No special instructions had been given for such arrest. "Very respectfully, your obedient servant, "James A. Seddon." "Fredericksburg, January 12, 1865. "Honorable Secretary of War: "I have arrested Hon. Henry S. Foote, at Occoquan, on his way to Washington, for the purpose of negotiating peace, as he avows. Full particulars, through Major Carrington, by mail. Have paroled him to await instructions. Please instruct me what disposition to make of him.
tt, Caperton, Dortch, Garland, Haynes, Hunter, Oldham, Semmes, Sparrow, Watson and Wigfall. Nays--Messrs. Brown, Graham, Hill and Walker. Whereupon, the oath prescribed by the Constitution was administered to Mr. Vest, and he took his seat in the Senate.] House of Representatives. The House met at 11 o'clock, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Dr. Duncan. The Speaker announced the following committee on the message of the President relative to the arrest of Hon. Henry S. Foote: Messrs. Clarke, of Missouri; Gilmer, of North Carolina; Chilton, of Alabama; Gholson, of Virginia, and McCallum, of Tennessee. The House passed a Senate bill amendatory of the act providing for local defence and local service. Also, a Senate joint resolution of thanks to General Stand Watie, Colonel Gano, and the officers and men under their commands, for gallant military service. The House also passed a bill to provide for the payment of provost marshals and military
n, we will state that General Singleton is at the Spotswood Hotel, where he has been called on by a number of citizens. We should not be surprised to see old Horace Greeley next, flying around in Richmond as a peace commissioner. Hon. Henry S. Foote, of Tennessee, is still at Fredericksburg, the House of Representatives not having yet decided what action they will take in his case.--Persons who came down from Fredericksburg yesterday state that Mr. Foote was very indignant that he shoext, flying around in Richmond as a peace commissioner. Hon. Henry S. Foote, of Tennessee, is still at Fredericksburg, the House of Representatives not having yet decided what action they will take in his case.--Persons who came down from Fredericksburg yesterday state that Mr. Foote was very indignant that he should have been arrested, and demanded to be brought to Richmond immediately; and when this was refused him, he wrote to Judge Halyburton, petitioning for a writ of habeas corpus.
r-General Butler, Fortress Monroe: What is the prospect for getting your expedition started? It is a great pity we were not ten or twelve days earlier; am confident it would have been successful. Have you heard from Palmer? The Richmond papers give no account of any Federals on the Roanoke or Weldon road south of Weldon. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Official: T. S. Bowers, Assistant Adjutant-General. The Washington peace rumors and Speculations — Arrival there of Mrs. H. S. Foote. The Tribune contains a good deal of high-pressure peace news. The Yankee correspondents at Washington are trying their hands on the quality and quantity of peace rumors that they can manufacture. A Washington correspondent of the Tribune telegraph on the 13th: An old hand at peace negotiation declared to-day to a committee room full of congressmen that, from his knowledge of what was, and would be, done in Richmond, he knew that a cessation of hostilities preliminary to forma
erate Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, on yesterday issued a writ of habeas corpus on the petition of the Hon. Henry S. Foote, a member of the Confederate House of Representatives from Tennessee, commanding Captain Hugh S. Doggett, provost-marshal of Fredericksburg, to bring before the Judge the body of Henry S. Foote on Thursday next, and to show cause why he should not be set at liberty. Mr. Foote, in his petition, states that he had been arrested and was held in custody by order Mr. Foote, in his petition, states that he had been arrested and was held in custody by order of Captain Doggett, who professed to be acting by the orders of "one James A. Seddon, Secretary of War," &c. Happily, this matter has been settled by the House of Representatives, to whom it was referred by the President, declaring, on yesterday, thl the circumstances of the case, it is expedient that the military authorities discharge him from custody." We presume Mr. Foote has already been placed at liberty. Mr. J. W. Singleton, of Illinois, Yankee peace Democrat and peace commissioner
placed. Judge Halyburton, of the Confederate Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, or yesterday issued a writ of habeas corpus on the potion of the Hon. Henry S. Foote, a member of the Confederate House of Representatives from Tennessee, commanding Captain Hugh S. Doggett, provost-marshal of Fredericksburg, to bring before the Judge the body of Henry S. Foote on Thursday next, and to show cause why he should not be set at liberty. Mr. Foote, in his petition, states that he had been arrested and was held in custody by order of Captain Doggett, who professed to be acting by the orders of "on James A. Seddon, Secretary of War," &c. Happily, this maMr. Foote, in his petition, states that he had been arrested and was held in custody by order of Captain Doggett, who professed to be acting by the orders of "on James A. Seddon, Secretary of War," &c. Happily, this matter has been settled by the House of Representatives, to whom it was referred by the President, declaring, on yesterday, that they "are of opinion that the good of the country would not be subserved by the forced attendance of said member upon the sessions of this House; but that, under all the circumstances of the case, it is exp
pecial committee to whom was referred the President's message and accompanying documents relative to the arrest of Hon. Henry S. Foote. The committee report that said H. S. Foote has been absent from this House for some time without leave. ThaH. S. Foote has been absent from this House for some time without leave. That before he left he indicated his purpose to resign; therefore, it is the opinion of the committee that the public interest would not be subserved by compelling the attendance of Mr. Foote in the sessions of the House. And it is, therefore, expedient that the military authorities discharge the said H. S. Foote from custody. On motion of Mr. Conrad, of Louisiana, the House adopted a resolution that the Hon. H. S. Foote has no privileges as a member of the House, and that the President be H. S. Foote has no privileges as a member of the House, and that the President be so informed. On motion, the House adjourned. Tuesday's proceedings. The House was opened with prayer by Rev. Mr. Peterkin, of the Episcopal Church. The House passed a Senate bill increasing the salary of the Vice-President to $9,0
e interference of certain parties. He would have been released but for a telegraphic dispatch from Mr. Seddon, which reads: "captain H. S. Doggett: " H. S. Foote until further orders. "[Signed] James & Seddon, "Secretary of War." Mr. Foote said that his object in going to the outer lines was: First. To sendd that he had written a letter to the Speaker of the House, resigning his seat. Mr. Snead, of Missouri, offered the following resolution: "Whereas, Henry S. Foote, a member of this House from the State of Tennessee, having absented himself from it without leave, and having, by his own admission, written and forwarded tog his resignation as a member of the House, and was thereafter arrested whilat unlawfully attempting to pass to the enemy's capital. "Resolved, That said Henry S. Foote is unworthy to occupy a seat upon the floor of the House, and is hereby expelled." On motion of Mr. Gilmer, it was referred to the Committee on Election
ibune. Butler, also, on last Monday, arrived in Washington, whither he has been summoned to give an account of his stewardship. The Confederate Congress, on yesterday, passed a resolution appointing a joint committee to prepare an address to the people of the Confederate States, assuring them of the unalterable determination of Congress to continue, with all its energy, the struggle for independence in which we are engaged, and assuring them of the final triumph, which, in its solemn judgment, must crown our efforts if we stand firm and united together, and wield our resources with strength and wisdom. In the House of Representatives, yesterday, Mr. Foote made a speech in explanation of how he came to Occoquan; and resolutions for his expulsion were offered and referred to the Committee on Elections. Thomas S. Petit, Esq., editor of the Owensboro' (Kentucky) Monitor, who has been exiled from his native State by General Burbridge, arrived in this city on yesterday.
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