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Doc. 63.-occupation of Harrisonburgh, Va. General Fremont's despatches. headquarters Mountain Department, army in the field, Harrisonburgh, June 7. To Hone enemy continued his retreat. Full particulars will be forwarded by mail. J. C. Fremont, Major-General. Headquarters, army in the field, Harrisonburgh, Saturday, oad, and discovered a portion of the enemy's forces encamped in the timber. J. C. Fremont, Major-General Commanding. New-York Tribune account. Fremont's heaFremont's headquarters, Harrisonburgh, Va., June 7, 1862. The march from Newmarket, yesterday, was without opposition, until the advance — guard reached Harrisonburgh. Rebel mand of Col. Windham, of First New-Jersey regiment, was ordered forward by Gen Fremont, to take possession of the town and reconnoitre a short distance beyond. Befoe left. The people of Harrisonburgh agree in stating that he did not expect Gen. Fremont to reach the town until to-night, and it is probable that when surprised by
That army was constituted as follows: First corps, under Major-General Fremont. Second corps, under Major-General Banks. Third corpsgth of infantry and artillery as reported to me was as follows: Fremont's corps, eleven thousand five hundred strong; Banks's corps, reporition. This was particularly the case with the army corps of Major-Gen. Fremont, a sad report of which was made to me by Gen. Sigel, when he relieved Gen. Fremont in command of the corps. My first labors were directed to the reorganization of some of the divisions and brigades ofolutely necessary for troops in the field. The corps of Banks and Fremont were in the valley of the Shenandoah, between Winchester and Middl, for the skilful manner in which he manned them. A detachment of Fremont's, more familiarly known as jackass guns, were taken to the Height One 50-pound Parrott. Six 6-pound guns, and several pieces of Fremont's guns, of but little value. Seven of the whole number were thoro
nd of the army of Virginia. That army was constituted as follows: First corps, under Major-General Fremont. Second corps, under Major-General Banks. Third corps, under Major-General McDowelnamed. Their effective strength of infantry and artillery as reported to me was as follows: Fremont's corps, eleven thousand five hundred strong; Banks's corps, reported at fourteen thousand fiveed, and in a demoralized condition. This was particularly the case with the army corps of Major-Gen. Fremont, a sad report of which was made to me by Gen. Sigel, when he relieved Gen. Fremont in commGen. Fremont in command of the corps. My first labors were directed to the reorganization of some of the divisions and brigades of that corps, and to supplying the whole force with much of the material absolutely necessary for troops in the field. The corps of Banks and Fremont were in the valley of the Shenandoah, between Winchester and Middletown, the bulk of the forces being in the vicinity of the latter plac
to spike them had been given.) They were then dismounted, spiked, and otherwise rendered ineffective. Too much praise cannot be awarded to Capt. McGrath, when commanding the guns, for the skilful manner in which he manned them. A detachment of Fremont's, more familiarly known as jackass guns, were taken to the Heights during the day, and rendered valuable assistance. They were manned by company I, Twelfth regiment New-York State militia. Col. Ford, though seriously indisposed, left his couch Twelve 3-inch rifled guns. Six James's. Six 24-pound howitzers. Four 20-pound Parrott guns. Six 12-pound guns. Four 12-pound howitzers. Two 10-inch Dahlgrens. One 50-pound Parrott. Six 6-pound guns, and several pieces of Fremont's guns, of but little value. Seven of the whole number were thoroughly spiked. But few horses were taken, the cavalry having secured most of them. The Commissary Department comprised six days rations for twelve thousand men. This embraces nea
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter III (search)
knowledge of the operations conducted by General Fremont in Missouri is so slight that I must confent of batteries until September 16, when General Fremont ordered me to visit Cincinnati, Pittsburg Jr., said he wanted me to go with him to see Fremont; so we went the next morning. The headquarteoncealment of the opposition of the Blairs to Fremont. I had another occasion at that time to learn something important as to Fremont's character. He had ordered me to convert the 1st Regiment ohe arsenal a battery of new rifled guns which Fremont had purchased in Europe. I applied to him pecould possibly have been. I explained to General Fremont the great need of field-guns and equipmenrived in the early part of October, 1861, General Fremont had taken the field in the central part o was commanding, by special assignment of General Fremont, a brigade in which at least one of the c; but that would be in plain disregard of General Fremont's order, the authority for which nobody k[2 more...]
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter IV (search)
Chapter IV Halleck relieves Fremont of the command in Missouri a special State militia brigadier General of the Missouri militia a hostile Committee sent to Washington the Missouri quarrel of 1862 in command of the army of the Frontier absent through illness battle of Prairie Grove compelled to be Inactive traomas's old Division of the Fourteenth Corps reappointed Major General a Hibernian Striker. on November 19, 1861, Major-General H. W. Halleck relieved Major-General Fremont of the command of the Department of the Mississippi. On November 21 I was appointed brigadier-general of volunteers, and reported to General Halleck for dany matters less purely military which entered largely into the history of that time deserve more than a passing notice. During the short administration of General Fremont in Missouri, the Union party had split into two factions, radical and conservative, hardly less bitter in their hostility to each other than to the party of s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kearny, Stephen Watts 1794-1847 (search)
der the eye and approval of the commodore: Fremont throughout the California war was strictly anon entered into on the 13th inst. by Lieutenant-Colonel Fremont with the leaders of the CaliforniansCalifornia. The motives which actuated Colonel Fremont in electing to pursue the course which hetion of them had subsided. Should Lieutenant-Colonel Fremont, who has the option to return or remt by the President's directions it was at Colonel Fremont's option whether he would remain in Califollowing letter: General Kearny to Colonel Fremont. headquarters, 10th Military Deptartment. coming from myself. A few weeks later Colonel Fremont received orders from General Kearny to rearny, Commanding, etc. To this request Colonel Fremont received the following reply: Geneet out for the United States, attended by Colonel Fremont, who was treated, however, with deliberat can be paid at the earliest date. Lieutenant-Colonel Fremont having performed the above duty, wil[13 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lexington (search)
,000. Then Price cut off the communication of the garrison with the town, their chief source of water supply. The next day he took possession of the town, closed up the garrison, and began a vigorous siege. For seventy-two hours Mulligan and his little band sustained it, amid burning sun-heat by day and suffocating smoke at all times, until ammunition and provisions were exhausted, and on the morning of the 20th he was compelled to surrender. The loss of this post was severely felt, and Fremont, resolving to retrieve it, at once put in motion 20,000 men to drive Price and his followers out of Missouri. The National loss in men was forty killed and 120 wounded; the Confederates lost twenty-five killed and seventy-five wounded. Mulligan and his officers were held prisoners of war; the men were paroled. The spoils were six cannon, two mortars, 3,000 muskets, 750 horses, wagons, teams, etc., and $100,000 worth of commissary stores. A week before the arrival of Mulligan at Lexingt
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), California (search)
d Pio Poco becomes governor in his stead......Feb. 21, 1845 Colonel Fremont on a third expedition obtains permission from Mexico, through o continue his explorations of the coast......Jan. 27, 1846 Colonel Fremont, in Oregon, receives orders to watch the Mexican and British rand bear and the words, California republic ......June 14, 1846 Fremont assumes command of insurgents at Sonoma......July 5, 1846 Starshe bear flag, July 9, and over Sutter's Fort......July 11, 1846 Fremont embarks in the schooner Cyane, commodore Dupont, and occupies Sa.July 31, 1846 Americans, under Com. Robert F. Stockton and Colonel Fremont, capture Los Angeles......Aug. 13, 1846 First number of an Los Angeles regained by the Americans......Jan. 10, 1847 Colonel Fremont assumes the civil government under commission from Commodore S, issues a proclamation from Monterey as governor, and directs Colonel Fremont to deliver in person, at Monterey, all public documents in his
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wyoming, (search)
ty wagons, from the Platte through South Pass to the Green River. At the junction of Lead Creek he builds a fort......1832 William Sublette and Robert Campbell erect a fort on Laramie Fork, which they name Fort William, since Fort Laramie.......1834 First emigrant train for Oregon and California crosses Wyoming......1841 Fort Bridger erected on Green River by James Bridger, a famous trapper......1842 Col. J. C. Fremont, with a government exploring expedition, ascends and names Fremont's Peak......1842 Mormon pioneers, led by Brigham Young, pass Fort Laramie on their way to Great Salt Lake through South Pass......June 1, 1847 Part of Wyoming is included in the territory acquired by the United States from Mexico by the treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo......Feb. 2, 1848 Fort Laramie transferred to the United States......1849 Fort Bridger sold for $8,000 to the Mormons......1853 Sioux Indian war begins; Lieutenant Grattan and twenty-eight men sent from Fort Laramie
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