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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 21 5 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 19 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 17 3 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 17 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 16 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 16 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 13 5 Browse Search
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id cannonade from Capt. Huntington's battery.--N. Y. Times, April 8. The gunboat Pittsburgh ran the blockade of Island Number10, last night, under a terrific fire from the rebel batteries. Four steam transports and five barges were also got through the Slough, from Phillips's Landing, above the Island, to New Madrid, by Col. Bissell's corps of engineers. This morning, under the fire of the Union gunboats, which silenced one of the rebel batteries, a company, under Capts. Lewis and Marshall, crossed the Mississippi at New Madrid and spiked the guns. Another force took three other batteries, spiked the guns, and threw the ammunition into the river. At eleven o'clock, in the face of the fire of the remaining rebel batteries, Gen. Paine, with four regiments and a battery of artillery, crossed the Mississippi Subsequently the divisions of Gens. Hamilton and Stanley crossed; also Gen. Granger with his cavalry. They are now strongly posted, ready for any emergency.--(Doc. 116.)
e boats for two miles. Three men were killed and one man wounded on the ram and transports in this affair. Cassville, Mo., occupied by about one hundred rebel troops, was this day attacked by a detachment of the First Arkansas cavalry, under the command of Captain Gilstray, and captured, completely routing the rebel force, killing and wounding a number, and taking nineteen prisoners. They also captured a number of horses and fire-arms. The officers of the United States Sanitary Commission received at New York a telegraphic despatch from San Francisco, California, announcing that the citizens of that city had contributed one hundred thousand dollars for the relief of sick and wounded soldiers and seamen of the National army and navy. The Union force at Shepherdsville, Ky., under Colonel Granger, commanding the post, were attacked by a body of rebel cavalry; but, after a short skirmish, the rebels were repulsed, with a loss of five killed and twenty-eight taken prisoners.
er were routed and driven for six or eight miles. The Nationals captured a number of horses and fire-arms, the latter of which the rebels threw away in their flight.--Baltimore American. Van Buren, Ark., was entered and captured by a force of Union troops, under the command of General J. G. Blunt, together with the rebel garrison, a large amount of ammunition, four steamboats laden with army supplies, and a ferry-boat.--(Doc. 90.) Major Foley, commanding an expedition sent by Major-General Granger to Elk Fork, Campbell County, Tenn., composed of two hundred and fifty men of the Sixth and Tenth Kentucky cavalry, surprised a camp of rebels, three hundred and fifty strong, at that place, killing thirty, wounding one hundred and seventy-six, and capturing fifty-one, without the loss of a man. All of their camp equipage was burnt, eighty horses, and a large amount of arms captured.--(General Wright's Despatch. Early this morning the attack on Vicksburgh was resumed, and contin
, was captured by the First South-Carolina colored regiment, under the command of Colonel T. W. Higginson, and a portion of the Second South-Carolina colored regiment, under Colonel Montgomery. The people were in great fear of an indiscriminate massacre; but the negroes behaved with propriety, and no one was harmed.--(Doc. 132.) The sloop Peter, of Savannah, Ga., while attempting to run the blockade at Indian River Inlet, Fla., was this day captured by the gunboat Gem of the Sea.--General Granger came up with the rebels at Rutherford's Creek, Tenn., and captured several of their number. President Lincoln issued a proclamation, ordering all soldiers, whether enlisted or drafted, who were absent from their regiments without leave, to return to their respective regiments before the first day of April, on pain of being arrested as deserters, and punished as the law provided.--(Doc. 133.) A detachment of National troops, consisting of the Sixth and Seventh regiments of Illi
March 12. The expeditionary force under Major-General Gordon Granger, which moved on Monday against Van Dorn's rebel army, returned to Franklin, Tenn., this afternoon, having driven the enemy beyond Duck River. The infantry went no farther than Rutherford Creek, but the cavalry, under Colonel Minty, of the Fourth brigade, made a thorough reconnaissance of the country beyond the creek to Duck River. The second day's march brought the expedition to Rutherford Creek, where, for a time, the rebels promised fight. Their positions were well chosen, their artillery commanding the pike and several crossings. A blinding rain, however, prevented General Granger attempting the passage of the stream, which was flood-high and foaming. The troops bivouacked for the night, expecting to drive the enemy on the succeeding day. Yesterday came in clear and beautiful, giving the artillerists a fine opportunity for practice, which they improved excellently by numerous shots. Preparations w
ey were surprised and completely routed. Lieutenant Daniels of the rebel party was killed in the fight that took place, and three others were wounded. Caldwell escaped on a very fleet horse, while his men, except three who were captured, fled to the woods, leaving their horses in the hands of the Nationals.--Chicago Tribune. Franklin, Tenn., was attacked by the rebel forces under General Van Dorn, who were repulsed and routed by the Union army of occupation, under the command of General G. Granger.--(Doc. 160.) The rebels in the vicinity of Fort Donelson, Tenn., having been gathering all the horses fit for cavalry service, General Rosecrans ordered all the good animals in that neighborhood to be taken by the forces under his command. While engaged in this duty, seventy of his men met an equal number of rebels near Waverly, when a fight ensued, in which twenty-one of the latter, including Major Blondin and two captains, were taken prisoners.--Captain A. G. Webster was execu
f barns, containing stores for the rebels, such as grain, corn, whisky, cotton goods, etc., were destroyed.--(Doc. 56.) A large and enthusiastic Union meeting was held at Chicago, Ill., this evening, at which speeches were made by Senators Trumbull and Doolittle and others.--Colonel A. Baird, in command of the garrison at Franklin, Tenn., was attacked by a force of rebels under General Forrest, and driven into his intrenchments, but being reenforced by a brigade of infantry sent by General Granger, he succeeded in repulsing the enemy with a heavy loss. At the same time an attack was made on Triune, but the rebels were driven off with a loss of two hundred men, four hundred horses, and a large quantity of camp and garrison equipage.--(Doc. 4.) General Burnside's order suppressing the circulation of the Chicago Times was revoked.--the Twenty-second regiment N. Y. S. V., under the command of Colonel Phelps, returned to Albany from the seat of war. A fight took place at Sa
nto Annandale, Va., capturing several sutlers who were in the vicinity, and burning a number of hospital stores and sutlers' wagons. The Maryland Club-house at Baltimore, having degenerated into a resort for those who are disaffected toward the Government, and hostile to its legally constituted authorities, was closed by order of Major-General Schenck.--Manchester, Tenn., was entered and occupied by the Union forces under General J. J. Reynolds.--Shelbyville, Tenn., was occupied by General Granger.--Joel Parker, Governor of New Jersey, on the reception of a message from Governor Curtin, informing him of the second entrance of the rebels into Pennsylvania, renewed his call upon the citizens of the State to hold themselves in readiness for immediate service.--York, Pa., was occupied by the rebels under General Gordon.--(Doc. 81.) The schooner Varnum H. Hill was captured by the rebel privateer Florida, in latitude 30° north, longitude 48° 50′, but was released on a bond, on con
September 28. President Lincoln directed that the Twentieth and Twenty-first army corps be consolidated and called the Fourth army corps, and that Major-General Gordon Granger be the commander of this consolidated corps. He also directed that a Court of Inquiry be convened to inquire into and report upon the conduct of Major-Generals McCook and Crittenden in the battles of the nineteenth and twentieth instant. These officers were relieved from duty in the army of the Cumberland, and were ordered to repair to Indianapolis, Ind., reporting their arrival by letter to the Adjutant-General of the army.--Lieutenant Earl and thirty men, belonging to the Fourth Wisconsin cavalry, captured a party of rebel guerrillas and cavalrymen, in the neighborhood of the junction of the Amite and Comite Rivers, La., and safely conducted them into Baton Rouge. Among the prisoners were Colonel Hunter (Ten-Mile Bob) and Captain Penny, the leaders in the raids and attacks on the river steamboats in t
captured. The train was sent to camp. The train-guard was also captured.--Official Report. General Saxton issued a circular to the freedmen of South-Carolina, authorizing them to locate in the lands in that department which were about to be sold by the Tax Commissioners, not exceeding twenty acres for each head of a family. The description of the land, when located, to be accompanied by the deposit of the Government price, about one dollar and twenty-five cents per acre. Major--General Granger reported, from Nashville, Tennessee, that he sent a detachment of cavalry from that place, under Colonel Shelby, to pursue Hawkins and other guerrillas. He overtook Hawkins near Piney Factory, and routed and pursued him to Centreville, where he made a stand; routed him again, and pursued him until his forces dispersed. The rebel loss was fifteen or twenty killed, and sixty-six prisoners. The Union loss was slight.--General Thomas's Report. The battle of Bayou Grand Coteau, La.
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