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: Allston, Benjamin, major; Mullins, John, major. Fifth Cavalry regiment (consolidated with Fifteenth Cavalry, November 8, 1864): Allen, James H., lieutenant-colonel; Boston, Reuben B., colonel; Douglas, Beverly B., major; Eells, John, major; Harding, Cyrus, Jr., major; Pate, H. Clay, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Fuller, John W., major; Rosser, Thomas L., colonel. Fifth and Fifteenth Virginia Cavalry (consolidated November 8, 1864): Harding, Cyrus, Jr., major. Fifth battalion Reserves:Harding, Cyrus, Jr., major. Fifth battalion Reserves: Henry, P. M., lieutenant-colonel. Fifth Infantry battalion Local Defense Troops (Arsenal battalion): Brown, W. Le Roy, lieutenant-colonel; Ennis, Philip J., lieutenant-colonel; Vaughan, John B., major. Fifth Infantry battalion: Archer, F. H., lieutenant-colonel; Foster, William R., major; Wilson, John P., Jr., major. Fifth Infantry regiment: Baylor, William S. H., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Harman, William H., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Harper. Kenton, colonel; Koiner, Absalom, m
mile, were posted, beginning at the fort, the Twenty-seventh North Carolina, Major Gilmer; the Thirty-seventh, Colonel Lee; the Seventh, Colonel Campbell; the Thirty-fifth, Colonel Sinclair, and a battalion of militia under Colonel Clark. Across the railroad, for a mile and a half, the only forces were the Twenty-sixth North Carolina, Colonel Vance; two dismounted companies of the Second cavalry, and one unattached company of infantry, and to the right of these two pieces of Brem's Not Harding's, as Battles and Leaders has it. battery under Lieutenant Williams. Between the railroad and Vance's left there was, at a brickyard, a break in the Confederate lines. This break, the finding and occupation of which won the Victory for the Federals, was being protected by a redoubt when the opening of the battle stopped the work on the redoubt and left this vital point guarded only by some artillery acting as infantry. Back of the line, on the railroad, Col. C. M. Avery's regiment, the
orth Carolinians in Mississippi the battle of Chickamauga east Tennessee campaigning North Carolina cavalry in Virginia infantry engagements around Rappahannock Station fights at Kelly's ford, Bristoe and Payne's Farm. On the 16th of July, Clingman's brigade, consisting of the following North Carolina regiments, the Eighth, Colonel Shaw; the Thirty-first, Lieut.-Col. C. W. Knight; the Fifty-first, Colonel McKethan; the Sixty-first, Colonel Radcliffe, Lieutenant-Colonel Devane and Major Harding, was ordered to South Carolina to assist in the defense of Charleston harbor. The brigade arrived on the 13th, and was at once assigned to duty. The Fifty-first and Thirty-first became members of the garrison at Fort Wagner. The Eighth and Sixty-first went to James island. At Battery Wagner the garrison endured many hardships, suffering a constant cannonade from land batteries and ironclads, and being exposed to an alert sharpshooter force at all hours. In addition, the water was ba
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
le. Having his horse shot under him on Sunday, he entered the ranks of a Kentucky regiment on Monday and fell mortally wounded toward the close of the day. Not his State alone, but the whole Confederacy, has sustained a great loss in the death of this brave, upright and able man. In the conflicts of this day, continues Colonel Trabue, Lieut.-Col. Robert A. Johnston, after exemplary conduct, was wounded, Capt. William Mitchell was killed, and Capt. George A. King and Lieutenants Gillum, Harding and Schaub were wounded; all of the Fifth Kentucky. In the Sixth Kentucky, Lieutenant-Colonel Cofer, a cool, brave and efficient officer, was wounded; Capt. W. W. Bagby and Lieut. M. E. Aull were mortally wounded; Capts. D. E. McKendree and John G. Hudson were likewise wounded, as were also Lieuts. L. M. Tucker and Charles Dawson, the last named of whom was taken prisoner. Late in the evening of this second day, General Breckinridge, with the Kentucky brigade and Statham's, and some caval
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second Virginia regiment of cavalry, C. S. A. a tribute to its discipline and efficiency, and defiant Resolutions passed by it February 28th, 1865. (search)
d all of Brown's confederates who were captured with him. On the 27th of October, 1859, the case was moved for trial, the Commonwealth being represented by Messrs. Harding and Hunter, and the defense by Messrs. Botts and Green. An ineffectual effort was made on the part of the defense for delay, and the trial proceeded. Of course a full account of the evidence and argument of counsel cannot be expected in this article. Mr. Harding, the junior counsel for the State, opened on the law and was followed by Mr. Botts, and he by Mr. Hunter, who stated his purpose to avoid at that time anything by way of argument or explanation not immediately connected withnd consequent want of preparation, but the court directed the case to proceed. This was Saturday. The testimony was closed, and the case opened to the jury by Mr. Harding for the prosecution. When he concluded, the court adjourned to Monday following at 9 A. M. Upon assembling, pursuant to adjournment, Mr. Griswold opened for th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
d all of Brown's confederates who were captured with him. On the 27th of October, 1859, the case was moved for trial, the Commonwealth being represented by Messrs. Harding and Hunter, and the defense by Messrs. Botts and Green. An ineffectual effort was made on the part of the defense for delay, and the trial proceeded. Of course a full account of the evidence and argument of counsel cannot be expected in this article. Mr. Harding, the junior counsel for the State, opened on the law and was followed by Mr. Botts, and he by Mr. Hunter, who stated his purpose to avoid at that time anything by way of argument or explanation not immediately connected withnd consequent want of preparation, but the court directed the case to proceed. This was Saturday. The testimony was closed, and the case opened to the jury by Mr. Harding for the prosecution. When he concluded, the court adjourned to Monday following at 9 A. M. Upon assembling, pursuant to adjournment, Mr. Griswold opened for th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Lt. F. G., 188 Hammond, Capt. S. J., 134, 162. Hammond, Capt. T. L., killed, 191. Hampden, 112. Hampton, Anthony, 13. Hampton, Edward, 13. Hampton, John, 13. Hampton, Richard, 13. Hampton, Wade, 13, 94, 226, 262, 274. Hampton Roads Conference, 320. Hancock, Gen. W. S., 30, 48, 264. Hancock, Md., 90. Hanging Rock, Battle of, 5, 9, 10, 17, 30, 32. Hanna, 9. Hansbrough, Col., 88, 90. Harden, Capt. O., 15. Hare's Hill, 401, 410. Hardie, Gen. W. J., 131, 301, 309. 368. Harding, 359. Harman, Major, M. G., 87. Harpers Ferry, 20, 85, 268. Harper's History of the Rebellion, deprecated, 30, 31. Harris, Lt., Chas., 59. Harris, Col., 377. Harris, Col. D. B., 116. Harris, Gov. Isham G., 274, 352, 386. Harris, Hon. W. P., 275. Harrison, Miss, Belle, 93. Harrison, Lt., Geo. E., 92. Harrison, Capt. J. R, 15 Hartford Convention, 334, 434. Harvey, Lt., 401. Hastings, Battle of, 202. Haskell, Capt. W. T., 21. Hatch, 105. Hatch, Col., 82. Hatche
arrad, Margaret, 73. General Sullivan, The, 26. George III., King, 38. Gibson's Lock, 3. Gilman, Charles E., 38. Glines, Jacob T., 43. Goodwin, Timothy, 44. Governor's Garden, 30. Governor's Island, 30. Great Stanbridge, Eng., 25. Greaves, Thomas, Esq., 12, 14. Green, The, 30. Griffin, —, 22. Groton, Eng., 25, 35. Groton Manor, England, 25. Hadley, Eng., 25. Hale, Edward Everett, 39. Hamlet, William, 53. Hancock, Rev., John, 84. Hanover Street, Boston, 4. Harding (family), 43. Harlackenden, Roger, Esq., 75. Harris, Cary, 48. Harris, Thaddeus Mason, D. D., 48. Harris, William, 46, 47. Harris, Captain, William, 48, 64, 67. Hartt, Abijah, 44. Harvard College, 18, 44, 48, 65, 70, 82. Harvard Square, 75, 78, 82. Harvard University, 9, 51, 66. Hastings, Samuel, 79. Hawes, Frank Mortimer, 11, 43, 64, 87. Hawkins, Nathaniel, 89, 90, 91. Hay, John, 67. Hayes, A. A., 9. Hayes, John S., 36, 60. Haymarket Square, Boston, 4. Hays,——--, 6<
John K., bank officer, h. Mount Pleasant. Hall, Isaac, pedlar, h. Cambridge. Hall, Ann, widow, h. Bow. Hamblin, Samuel, pump maker, h. Cambridge. Ham, William, blacksmith, h. Franklin. Hall, John G., merchant, h. Summer. Hall, John, b. sash and door dealer, h. 2 Chestnut. Hall, Mrs. Lydia, widow, h. Elm. Hammond, George, b. brass founder, h. Spring. Hammond, William, b. iron dealer, h. No. 1 Chestnut. Hammond, Artemas, h. Spring. Hanson, Joseph, h. Dane. Harding, Nathan, b. shipping master, h. Mount Vernon. Harrison, Alfred, b. spike maker, h. near L. R. Road. Harvey, James, machinst, h. Cambridge. Hastings, James, b. bank teller, h. Cambridge. Hawkins, Nathaniel, boards with Henry Adams, h. Bow. Hawkins, Nathaniel Carlton, clothing dealer, h. Bow. Hanley, Michael, teamster, h. Milk. Hannaford, Fred W., b. harness maker, h. Prospect hill. Hayes, George W., yeoman, h. rear of Broadway. Hazletine, Moses, brickmaker, h. lead
Busha and Alfred Joyce were missing. The latter died in prison at Andersonville; the others were never heard from. Corporal Stimpson was maimed for life and Sergeants Turner and Morrison were slightly wounded. On May 10 the regiment was in the front line (where it was placed almost without exception all through this campaign). It made no actual demonstration but was exposed to artillery fire. On that day Sergeant Stevens, who had been recommended for promotion, and Privates Bierne and Harding were instantly killed. On May 12, while the 39th filled a gap between the 5th and 6th corps, Edward Ireland was killed and Henry A. Ireland was wounded. On the night of May 13, the command marched through deep mud and pitchy darkness to Spottsylvania, and remained there exposed to the fire of the enemy for a week, when the line was abandoned, leaving pickets to follow. Robert Livingstone of Co. C, one of these pickets, was taken prisoner and died at Andersonville. The Light Guard ha
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