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zard, Lieut., Jeff............................................... 63, 245 Hazen, Charles K.................................................... 145 Hazen, Jacob T.................. .......... 144,150 Heath, James....................................................... 140 Heath, James H................................................... 146, 285 Heffron, Wiliam........................................... 286 Heill, Frank........................................................ 292 Heintzelman, General.................................................. 57 Hendley, Robert...................................................... 107 Henry, John N................................................. 107, 108 Hervey, Joseph H............................................. 247, 250 Higginson, James.................................................. 322 Hill, John (A)....................................................... 324 Hill, John E......................................................
82, 283. Hatton, Robert, I, 240. Hawkins, Dexter, I, 128. Hawkins, Rush C., I, 325, 328. Hayes, Rutherford B., II, 482, 485. Hays, H. T., I, 293. Hays, William, I, 436, 438. Hazard, John O., I, 342, 343. Hazen, William B., I, 458, 465, 466, 553; II, 36, 38, 39, 87-97, 109, 110, 144, 148. Hazzard, George W., I, 79, 83, 197, 198, 243, 435. Hazzard, Mrs. George W., I, 79. Heath, William 8., I, 161. Hecker, Frederick, I, 468. Heckman, John P., I, 476. Heintzelman, 8. P., I, 142, 144, 146, 149, 152, 153, 156, 160, 161, 172, 216, 217, 218, 220, 227, 230, 234, 236, 244, 262, 264, 311, 312, 390. Herbert, B. H., II, 586. Hertz, Sue E., II, 575. Hess, Frederick, I, 517. Heth, Henry, I, 400, 406, 408. Higgins, Frank W., II, 574. Hill, A. P., I, 263, 304, 305, 332, 334, 335, 380, 385, 388, 400, 403, 404, 407, 421, 429, 580, 581. Hill, D. H., I, 141, 231, 232, 235, 275, 279-281, 284, 287, 290, 293, 294, 297, 299, 332. Hill, Ellas,
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
and misapprehending his motives, as if it had become a body of mis-representatives with the single purpose of decrying the commander of the Army of the Potomac, General McClellan had been carefully and methodically preparing his vast army for the field. I have referred to the onward movement ordered by the President on the twenty-second of February, with General McClellan in command of the grand army of the Potomac, organized into its several divisionary corps, under McDowell, Sumner, Heintzelman, Keyes, and Banks. Halleck was in charge of a department at the West, and Fremont in charge of the Mountain Department. It is with Banks's corps that our interest lies. While the others were to move on their devious way up the peninsula to Yorktown, Williamsburg, the Chickahominy, and the James, we were to move up the valley of the Shenandoah, closing this gateway to the enemy. Our force was as follows: We had the brigades that wintered with us at Frederick, commanded by Generals Hami
Williamsburg. It may be well imagined that McClellan, sorely disappointed, and knowing very well that the people of the North, who were already clamouring for a change of commanders, would not be satisfied with the barren occupation of the deserted works of Yorktown, was anxious to snatch some sort of victory from the rear-guard of the Confederate retreat, which he might magnify in official dispatches and Northern newspapers. 01 the morning of the 5th May, Gen. Hooker's division of Heintzelman's corps came up near Williamsburg with the Confederate rear-guard, commanded by Gen. Longstreet. The Federals were in a forest in front of Williamsburg; but as Hooker came into the open ground, he was vigorously attacked, driven back with the loss of five guns, and with difficulty held the belt of wood which sheltered and concealed his men from the Confederate fire. Other forces of the enemy were moved up, until Gen. Longstreet was engaging nine brigades of the Federal army. During the
, liable to be attacked by superiour numbers from Washington, on the one hand, and in danger of annihilation if Pope should face about and co-operate with a force moving in that direction. The enemy was being heavily reinforced. The corps of Heintzelman and Porter, probably twenty thousand strong, joined Pope on the 26th and 27th of August, at Warrenton Junction. Another portion of McClellan's army, transported from Westover, consisting of the corps of Franklin and Sumner, were at Alexandria near the turnpike. The line of battle stretched for a distance of about five miles from Sudley Springs on the left to the Warrenton road, and thence in an oblique direction towards the southwest. The disposition of the enemy's forces was, Gen. Heintzelman on the extreme right, and Gen. McDowell on the extreme left, while the army corps of Gen. Fitz-John Porter and Sigel, and Reno's division of Gen. Burnside's army, were placed in the centre. For a good part of the day, the action was fough
sequently filled the same chair in the College of New York. He was engineer in charge of the Capitol at Washington, from November, 1859, to March, 1861. Naturally the services of a loyal, trained soldier, so accomplished as was the subject of this sketch, were in eager demand in the spring of 186; he was appointed, May 14, colonel of the Twelfth United States Infantry, and three days later was commissioned brigadier general, United States volunteers. Gen. Franklin commanded a brigade in Heintzelman's division at Bull Run. During the period of organization of the Army of the Potomac, and until its movement in the spring of 1862, he commanded a division which was first assigned to McDowell's corps. The division was detached in April, 1862, and joined McClellan before Yorktown. Gen. Franklin commanded at West Point near the mouth of the Pamunkey, May 6, 1862, and during this month organized the Sixth Army Corps, which he commanded till the following November. During this period he
left and front on this side of the Potomac, and on the line of these foraging expeditions, were the three brigades of Heintzelman's division, commanded respectively by Generals Sedgwick, Jameson, and Richardson. Thanksgiving was observed here in ge as follows: Hooker's division on the extreme left, twenty-two miles below Washington on the east side of the Potomac; Heintzelman's division on the Mt. Vernon road below Alexandria; Sumner's and Franklin's on the right of Heintzelman, near Fairfax Heintzelman, near Fairfax Seminary; McDowell's and Keyes's on the right of Franklin; then Porter's, and on his right, McCall's. East of the Blue Ridge there were no Federal troops in Virginia to the west of McCall; but on the Maryland side, in the vicinity of Edward's Ferry,ivision along the line of march to the border of Alexandria County. It was now that the army corps were organized: Gens. Heintzelman, McDowell, Keyes, Sumner, and Banks,—each commanding one which included the division that had been previously in hi
to proceed by the way of Cumberland and of Whitehouse on the Pamunkey, striking the Chickahominy at New Bridge, while the left wing, consisting of the corps of Heintzelman and Keyes, kept the Richmond road to Bottom's Bridge farther down the Chickahominy Swamp. During the next eight or nine days the advance guards reached these which the swamp-creek is divided, and rendering the roads in the vicinity difficult of passage. A messenger who was sent to the commander of the left wing, Gen. Heintzelman, is said to have been delayed so that it was five o'clock before Kearney's division arrived, and after dark before the arrival of Gen. Hooker from White Oak pposite its position. At two o'clock on the 31st, these troops were ordered to cross without delay, and they immediately pushed forward to the support of Gen. Heintzelman. In the meantime Naglee's brigade, reinforced by artillery under Col. Bailey and by a part of Peck's brigade, had been again forced back by overpowering num
o far that they were enabled, the enemy falling back, to retire to their main body. When they arrived, past noon, at Savage's Station, they halted to complete the work of destruction. The troops in our rear at this moment were commanded by Gen. Heintzelman. At four o'clock, Magruder's force, which had hung upon Heintzelman's steps for two hours, made a spirited attack. From the first onslaught, the heroic soldiers of the Federal rear held their pursuers in check, fighting and retiring until Heintzelman's steps for two hours, made a spirited attack. From the first onslaught, the heroic soldiers of the Federal rear held their pursuers in check, fighting and retiring until dark. Under cover of night they passed through White Oak Swamp. In the meanwhile, the long trains of artillery, wagons, and ambulances, and the advance troops, had crossed the swamp during the day and were moving along the Quaker road which led to the James. While Magruder was pressing the Federal rear on this Sunday afternoon and evening, the fifth of the seven, Longstreet was making a detour of the swamp, with the design of striking the Federal force at the junction of thenine mile road
ment, we knew not; a portion of his army, Porter's corps, which had preceded us from Fortress Monroe, had been sent to reinforce Gen. Pope, who had been for several days menaced by the larger part of the Confederate army of northern Virginia. Heintzelman's corps, weary and footsore, now numbering but 10,000, had also joined the forces of Pope, but their artillery, horses, and wagons could not yet have arrived. Where were the commands of Sumner and Keyes? The Sixth Corps is here at Alexandrttempt to pass around our right. The result of this was the engagement at Chantilly on the morrow. During the morning, men of the Fifteenth Massachusetts, and of other commands not belonging to the Sixth Corps, came in, who related that Heintzelman's corps had, on the morning of the 28th, forced Jackson to retreat across Bull Run, by the Centreville pike; that McDowell had succeeded in checking Lee at Thoroughfare Gap in the Bull Run mountains; but that Jackson, having been attacked on
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